Biographies of Monroe County People
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From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 44 - 45

Brinker, General Henry, was born in Hanover, Prussia, in 1831, where he was partially educated. In 1851 he came to this country and located in New York city, where he finished his education and embarked in the produce and commission business. In 1871 he came to Rochester, where he conducted a branch of the same business, in connection with the New York concern, the firm being Henry Brinker & Co. He has long been identified with the prosperity and welfare of his adopted country, especially Rochester, where he was largely instrumental in causing the Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg Railroad to enter that city. He sold them the right-of-way through his property, and purchased the right-of-way of many others for the same purpose, thus increasing the shipping facilities of Rochester, and paving the way for its greater prosperity. He is also a large stockholder in several railways. June 17, 1855, he enlisted in the 3d Regiment, 1st Brigade, 1st Division N. Y. S. M., and August 5, 1857, was promoted second lieutenant, rising finally to be major-general of the 7th Division, and he has done efficient service in many parts of the State. In 1863 he married Annie Bruns of New York city, and they have four children: George H , Charles, Henry. jr., and Josephine. The general is a member of Germania Lodge No. 722, F. & A. M.. Iona Chapter No. 210 R. A. M., Cyrene Commandery No. 39 K. T., and is also a 32d degree Mason.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 45

Root, Henry, was born in Saratoga county, July 21, 1817. a son of Abel Root, a native of Connecticut, who came to this county in 1818, and settled in the town of Sweden, where he became a prosperous farmer, serving as justice, assessor, etc. He married Mary, daughter of Jabez Davis, and died in 1836 in his fiftieth year. Henry Root was educated in the district schools and Brockport Collegiate Institute and in 1838 married Sybil Salisbury, who died in 1851; her children were Rufus H. Root, Mrs. F. E. Terry and Mrs. C. J. White. His second wife was Amanda E. Howard, and had no children. Our subject resides on the old homestead, which has been in the possession of the family for seventy-seven years. He has held nearly all the offices within the gift of his townspeople, and has been president of the Brockport Agricultural Society for fifteen years.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 45 - 46

Hicks Family, The. - In 1621 the ship Fortune arrived at Plymouth, Mass., from London. She followed the Mayflower. With this second body of Puritans came Robert Hicks, the ancestor of the family in America. He settled in Duxbury, Mass. Two of his sons, John and Stephen, went to Long Island. John took a very active part in the affairs of the settlement, and at times filled the most important offices. A town in Long Island is named for the family; also a street in Brooklyn. Isaac Hicks came from Long Island to Wheatland in the beginning of the present century. His children were Samuel, Edward, Norris, Isaac, John, Abigail, Eliza, and Phoebe, all of whom except Samuel came to this county. Norris came early to Ogden, then having one child, Mary, who afterwards became the wife of Daniel Lord. The other children of Norris were Sarah, Stephen W., William and Victorine. The family located on the farm opposite that now owned by Stephen W. Hicks. Norris was a man of great physical endurance, having at one time walked from New York city to Niagara Falls. He died at the age of seventy-nine. Stephen was born on the farm opposite the one on which he now lives, June 3, 1826, and has made for himself a comfortable home and fortune. He married, in 1850, Martha Ketch, by whom he had two children, Blanche, who died in 1886, and William of Ogden. Mr. and Mrs. Hicks have been members of the Baptist Church over forty years. Mordecai Ketch, the father of Mrs. Hicks, was horn in Vergennes, Vt., in 1805. A the age of sixteen he started for "the West," as Western New York was then called. He walked from Vermont to Steuben county in this State, where an older brother had previously settled. In 1827 he settled on a farm in Sweden, with his young wife, whom he married in that town. They were the parents of eight children. His only son, James I. Ketch, enlisted in the war of the Rebellion, was taken prisoner and died in Salisbury prison in February. 1865.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 46

Gardner, Melvin, was born July 12, 1850, at Springfield Center, Otsego county. Russell Gardner, his father, removed from that county to the town of Penfield in 1852 and engaged in farming. At the outbreak of the Rebellion he enlisted in Co. G, 140th Regiment, and served three years without receiving an injury. He died in 1886, aged sixty-two years, leaving five sons and one daughter. Melvin, the oldest son, now a resident of Fairport, has besides farming dealt largely in agricultural implements and in raw furs of all kinds, shipping mostly to Boston. A staunch Republican, he held the position of commissioner of highways for five successive years, from 1888 to 1892. January 1, 1870, he married Mary Knickerbocker, whose father, the late Milton Knickerbocker, was born and died (aged sixty-five) in the house which is his daughter's home. One son, Chauncey M. Gardner, born June 11, 1873, a graduate of Rochester University, is now a traveling salesman for De Land & Co. of this town.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 46

Barnard, John, came from New Hampshire with his wife and two children and settled north of Adams Basin, in 1816. Pioneer Barnard had been a soldier in the war of 1812, and was at the battle of Plattsburg. His wife was Abigail Hackett, and their children, born in New Hampshire and in Ogden, were as follows: Sylvanus, who died at Adams Basin; Betsey, who married Robert Moore, moved to Michigan, where she died; William, of Ogden; John, who died in Michigan; and Rhoda, who married Lorenzo Baird. After living about forty years on the Ridge John Barnard removed to Adams Basin, and later to Allegany county, where he married a second wife, and there died. Captain William Barnard, as he was familiarly known, was born in Ogden, April 8, 1818, and when old enough began working on the State canal scow, first in the capacity of cook one year, then deck hand for twenty years, and was finally promoted to the position of foreman or captain, which position he now holds, having been in the employ of the State sixty-two years, without missing a single season. Captain Barnard, though seventy-seven years old, is still hale and hearty, and has many warm friends in Ogden and Sweden. His wife was Mary Warren, by whom he had five children: Mary, who married Charles Nobles; William, of Rochester; Hannah and Lamira, of Ogden, and Charles, who died in Texas January 2, 1894.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 46 - 47

Webster, Dr. John, who is remembered as one of the pioneers of Ogden, was born in 1780, and came from Berkshire county, Mass., in 1802, and settled on the farm now owned by his heirs. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. His wife, Susan, was born in the same year as her husband. They settled in the town early in the century, and the family became prominently identified with the local history of the locality. Mr. Webster practiced medicine in Ogden till his death in 1838. His wife died in 1842. Their children were Stephen, Asa, Jeremiah, Sylvester, Alvin, Huldah, William, John, William 2d, Hiram, and Susan. Of these children John, of Niagara county, and Dr. Hiram Webster of Michigan are now living. Alvin was born April 2, 1810, and was one of the most substantial farmers of the town. He married first Lucy A. Woodard, and their one child, Lucy A., died in infancy. His second wife was Cornelia, daughter of Simon and Prudence Bailey, and their children were Lucy A., who married Dr. William S. Millener; Charles A., of Rochester; Judson, who died young; and Judson H., now of Lockport. Alvin Webster died January 25, 1890. He was one of Ogden's active men, and although originally a Democrat became in later years a strong anti-slavery advocate and zealous Republican. The principal station of the famous "underground railroad" was at his house. He was one of the founders of the Methodist Protestant church of Ogden, and a leading member. Simon Bailey settled in this town in 1835, his family coming from Hartford county, Conn., though he was a native of Windham county. He was the father of eight children.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 47

Vroom, Hendrick D., was born in Hunterdon county, N. J., in 1796, and his wife, Maria Beekman, in 1797. They were married in Readington, N. J., December 20, 1820, by Rev. Peter Studdiford, and four years later left their New Jersey home and drove to Ogden, locating where Samuel W. Vroom now lives. The children of these parents were gs follows: Peter Q., born February 26, 1822, now at San Francisco, Cal.; Eliza, born November 15, 1823, who married Amos N. Colby; Henry, born November 7, 1825, now of San Francisco; Margaret, born July 31, 1827, who married Servetos Wilmot; Julia M., born August 18, 1835; Ellen J., born December 17, 1837, who died July 28, 1875; Samuel W., born January 18, 1840; George, born August 16, 1843, who died May 23, 1864. Hendrick D. Vroom died August 8, 1886, and his wife March 18, 1879. Samuel W. Vroom was born on his present farm, educated at Brockport Academy, July 26, 1862, enlisted in Co. B, 108th Regt. He returned to the old farm and has always there resided. Mr. Vroom married, May 24, 1871, Mary J. Tarbox, and had one child, George H., born October 14, 1873. His wife died October 17, 1873, and he married, March 25, 1875, Helen M. Gott, and they have one child, Clifford G., born October 15, 1876.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 47

Hallauer, George, was born in Webster, March 30, 1872, and is the youngest son of John W. Hallauer, who came from Switzerland in 1838, and later came to Webster, where he has been engaged in farming, and since 1882 has conducted a fruit evaporating business on a large scale, running at the present time in connection with his sons John and George, a factory in Webster, one in Rushville, one in Hulberton, Orleans county, and one at Utica, Livingston county, Mo., also being part owner and manager of the canning factory at Webster.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 47 - 48

Newman, J., was born and reared on a farm at Enfield Center, Tompkins county, N. Y. At the age of eighteen he left the farm to learn the trade of cabinet making. In 1854 he went to the city of Brooklyn, N. Y., and engaged in the building business. In 1856 he married Augusta O. Hulse of Fort Hamilton, N. Y. After his marriage he moved to Grand Rapids, Mich., and continued in the building business until the death of his wife five years later. After taking her remains east to her former home for interment, he came to Fairport and engaged in the building business for two years; then he commenced the manufacture and sale of furniture, later taking a partner, and finally selling out to him. In 1866 he married Amy A. Howe, daughter of Dea. Charles Howe of Perinton. In 1873 he purchased the Fairport Herald of G. C. Taylor, associating himself with G. T. Frost of Rochester, and continued the publication of the Herald up to 1874, then selling out to Mr. Frost, he engaged in the preparation of flavoring extracts and perfumery, continuing in the same business up to the present time. Mr. Newman favors the cause of Prohibition, and has filled the office of town clerk and various other positions.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 48

Chappel, Guy (deceased), was a native of Great Barrington, born April 22, 1801. The family were of English extraction, and first settled at New London, Conn. Guy Chappel came to the town of Riga about 1820, purchasing a farm in the wilderness, which he cleared up. He married Clarissa, daughter of Thomas Richmond, and the survivors of their family are Mrs. Sarah A. Orcutt of Minnesota; Mrs. Mary A. Walden, and Mrs. Clarissa Way of this town. Guy Chappel came to Sweden in 1832, and was known as one of the most successful and practical farmers in his town, taking an active interest in educational and religious matters, and he was a man whose judgment was sought by all who knew him. He died in 1883 in his eighty-second year.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 48

Friend, Joseph W., the leading fruit grower in Henrietta, was born in Rochester in 1844, a son of Sebastian Friend, a native of Baden, Germany, born in 1812, and a cooper by trade. At the age of eighteen the latter came to this country (1830) and settled in Rochester, where he worked at his trade until his death. He married Mary Baggy, also of Germany. and one of ten children, all of whom came to America with their parents, and settled in Rochester. Their children were Elizabeth, Joseph W., Anna, Amelia, and Barbara. At the age of fourteen our subject learned the cabinet-maker's trade, which he followed until 1884. Being somewhat interested in politics, he then received an appointment as janitor of School No. 17 of Rochester, which position he held until 1890, then resigned, and in 1891 came to Henrietta and bought a small farm, where he has since been successfully engaged in small fruit-growing. In 1861 he enlisted in the army, but being under age, his father refused his consent. Mr. Friend is a member of the A. O. U. W., Flower City Lodge. In 1867 he married Francis Minges, born in Rochester, and one of five sons and five daughters of John and Sophia (Wilhelm) Minges of Germany. Their children are: Delia, wife of William Turner of Henrietta; Mrs. Estella Nunn, of Rochester: Angeline, and Jerome J. Mrs. Friend is a member of Maccabees, Flower City Hive.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 48 - 49

Brown, William B., was a native of Lyme, Conn., who came when a young man to Ogden, where he was a pioneer and one of the most prominent men of the locality. He was a son of Elder Daniel Brown, who preached the first sermon in Rochester, crossing the river on horseback and delivering his sermon in a log house where the Powers block now stands; he was a Revolutionary soldier, and died at the age of eighty-four. William B. was drafted into service during the war of 1812, without even the chance of bidding good-bye to his family before starting for the frontier. He was also one of the early judges of the county, and a man of more than ordinary ability and judgment. He was a successful farmer, having accumulated a good property, and his home stood where Henry H. Goff's residence was built later. On this commanding site Judge Brown spent his days, his death occurring in 1854. at the age of seventy. He was one of the most influential men of his town, and was a representative in the State Legislature in 1833. He married first Miss Rachel Willey, and had two children, Maria, who married Rev. Lemuel Brooks, and William, lately deceased. Judge Brown married for his second wife, Sarah V. Toan, by whom he also had two children, Lydia, wife of George M. Cole, and Henry H., a merchant of Spencerport. Henry Harrison Brown was born December 20, 1851, and in 1874 first engaged in business in Spencerport, and with a brief intermission has since been a hardware merchant of the village. He is now president of the New York Retail Dealers' Implement Association, to which he has been twice elected. He has served as village president two terms, and as village treasurer; being also a trustee of the Congregational Church. In 1874 he married Frances B., daughter of John S. Brown of Rochester. They have had one child, Lulu Florence.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 49

Snapp, Archibald T., was born in Warren county, Pa., in 1835, and came to Rush in 1865, with his parents and two brothers. Of the latter, George is residing in this town, and Abram in Caledonia. His parents were George and Catherine (Scheuler) Snapp. Our subject bought the judge Jones farm, north of Mann's Corners. His father died in 1877 and his mother in 1884. In 1868 Archibald married Emma Dietrich, born in Rochester in 1844. She was the daughter of Abram Dietrich of Rochester, who was drowned in Canandaigua Lake in 1846. He was the son of Jacob, who came to this town from Pennsylvania, later. moved to Rochester, and died in Victor. Mrs. Snapp's mother was Margaret Filon of Rochester. She died in 1858. Mr. and Mrs. Snapp have two children, Mina, born in 1876, and Roy Filon, born in 1879.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 49

Post, Mrs. Sarah A., a lady of high social and business attainments, was born in this town, a daughter of Jonathan C. and Lucinda A. (Green) Babcock, of Rensselaer county. Her father was Jonathan Babcock, who came to town in 1828. He was an influential farmer of Henrietta, and was captain in the militia. He was born in 1800, and was twice married, first to Ann Morey, by whom he had one child, Jane A.; and second to Lucinda A. Green, by whom he bad five children: Mrs. Lucinda A. Kocher, Mrs. William A. Bly, Mrs. Olive L. Dudley, Sarah A., and Jonathan C. The latter at the age of eighteen enlisted in the 108th N. Y. Vols., returned home sick, and died a month later. The parents died February 24, and March 8, 1858. Mrs. Post married, in 1861, Aldis A. Post, born in this town in 1822, a son of Abel Post, of Vermont, who settled here in 1816. Mr. Post was an active, energetic, and successful farmer, and his death occurred in 1885, since which Mrs. Post has ably conducted the business, and carried on the farm. She has erected a large, handsome, double dwelling, also well-planned barns, and her good judgment and fine taste have given her one of the most beautiful country residences in the town. In a portion of her home her niece, Cora Bly, whom she reared from childhood, resides with her husband, Warren Markham, who conducts the farm. Mrs. Post is active in the Baptist church.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 49 - 50

De Witt, C. G., was born at Orangeville, O., March 24, 1851. His father, Jacob C., was at that time a carpenter, and removed to Fairport in 1875, and entered the employ of the De Land Chemical Works as a cooper. Our subject enjoyed but such educational facilities as were afforded by common schools, but being of a studious and thoughtful temperament, made the best of his advantages, and has risen to a position of importance. In 1867 he came here and began "at the foot of the ladder" in the De Land factory, and is now at the head of the shipping department, and since 1884 has been superintendent of their traveling salesmen and agencies. He has served Fairport in many official capacities with credit and satisfaction, as village trustee and treasurer, police justice, water commissioner, clerk of the Board of Education, etc., and in the First Baptist church as deacon, treasurer and Sunday school superintendent. Personally very popular, his influence is always given towards the furtherance of the greatest good to the greatest number. In 1874 he married Ida J. Colman of Lee, Oneida county, and has one child, Minnie, born December 29, 1874. lie lost two sons, Arthur C., and Clarence E., aged respectively two and seven years. His maternal ancestry dates back to William Hyde, the first who came to this country from England in 1633, and whose sister Anna married James II of Scotland.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 50

Nichols, Solomon, was born in 1788, and died March 31, 1864, and came with his family to Ogden from Madison in 1837, settling on the farm now owned by his son Joseph. He was twice married, and the father of fourteen children, all of whom save one have lived in this town. They were Eliza A., Sally M., William W., John F., Munson C. G., Joseph, Benjamin E., Harriet M., Rosetta E., Henry A., Emily E., Martha E., Charles M., and Jennie E. The father was a carpenter, and the conducting of the farm devolved upon his sons. Mr. Nichols died in 1864, aged seventy-six. His first wife was Ann Eaton, who died in 1834, and his second was Caroline Chapman, who died in 1879. William W. Nichols was born in Lenox, Madison county, in 1819, and came to the Genesee country with his father. The oldest son in a large family, he was obliged to work from earliest youth. The care of the family fell largely upon him, but on reaching his majority he began for himself, working on Cornelius Voorhies's farm, and here he has since lived, having married Mary E. Voorhies, daughter of C. Voorhies, and later became owner of one-half the Voorhies farm. Of the ten children born to Mr. and Mrs. Nichols, four grew to maturity, and three survive: Elizabeth A., wife of Henry Dyer; Oscar E., of Ogden; and Susan M., wife of Cornelius Wright of Milwaukee, Wis. His wife died in 1878, and in 1882 Mr. Nichols married Martha W., daughter of Nathan Fay Clark. Mr. Nichols has been for thirty years an elder in the Ogden Center Presbyterian church, and for nearly sixty years a member. Cornelius Voorhies was a son of the pioneer, John Voorhies, who settled on the Buffalo road, seven miles west of Rochester, in 1813. Nathan Pay Clark came to Riga about 1815, and to Ogden in 1835, but was a native of Massachusetts.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 50

Snider, Denton G., was born in Ulster county March 30, 1833, and in 1852 came to Monroe county and engaged in farming, which he still continues, on the farm of Dr. Isaac Garrison. In 1865 he married Mary C., daughter of John A. Latta, who began business at Brockport in tanning leather and in the manufacture of boots and shoes. lie was one of the original members of the Local Board of the State Normal School, and a prominent supporter of the M. E. church of Brockport. Mr. Latta married Syrena Shirtz, daughter of Elias Shirtz, and of five children two survive: Mrs. Julia Smith and Mrs. Snider. He died in 1891, in his eighty-first year, a loss to the whole community. Denton Snider is one of the practical and successful farmers of the town, raising large amounts of hay, grain and stock. He has held various positions of honor and trust in the community.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 51

Wilbur, Smith, postmaster of Fairport under President Harrison, was born March 17, 1828, at Amenia, Dutchess county, where his father, the late Brownell Wilbur, was then an extensive farmer and stock dealer. The first American members of this family were Quakers of Rhode Island, and of old English descent. Brownell Wilbur in later life became a resident of Fairport and a justice of the peace. Smith Wilbur was engaged in active business as a dealer in produce from 1851 to 1891, also as a contractor on various public works, and as a merchant. He was appointed postmaster in May, 1891. A figure prominent in the First Baptist church, his benevolence and activity have tended towards the advancement of Fairport's best interests in the matters of extensions and new streets, with the consequent improvement of real estate


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 51

Fisk, E. J., was born at Lebanon, Madison county, N. Y., December 4, 1860, where his father, Luman Fisk, was a large land owner, and where his great-grand-father was one of the first settlers, coming from Connecticut in 1800. Mr. Fisk's school days were passed at Clinton Liberal Institute and at Cazenovia Seminary, and in 1878 he entered the office of Judge Prindle at Norwich, N. Y., as a law student. After admission to the bar in December, 1881, he began the practice of his profession at Oriskany Falls, Oneida county, removing to Hamilton in 1885, and five years later to Fairport, where he is already highly esteemed as a citizen and as a man, aside from his legal skill. Immediately upon the attainment of his majority he was made justice of the peace at Lebanon, and in 1892 president of the village of Fairport. At Oriskany Falls, in 1884, he married Eugenie Randall of that place, by whom he had two daughters, Mildred, born in 1888, and Hazel, born in 1890.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 51

Todd, Mrs. Sophia. - The late John Todd, son of Wright Todd, was born in the old home in Westchester county January 22, 1822. He came with his parents to this town in 1826, was educated in the schools of his day, was a farmer by occupation, and married, in 1846, Sophia Joiner of Henrietta, and they have had six children: Sarah A., Emma J., Alta, Carrie A., Charles, and George W. Sarah married Enos Stone of this town, and they have six children: Bryant, Minnie S., Ralph T., Louise J., Arthur, and Harold J. Emma married J. Myron Truesdale (son of Samuel, who settled here in 1823), and their children are Walter and Carrie S. Alta died young. Carrie A. married Rev. W. H. Latourette of Oakland, Cal., and has four children: Ethel A., Beulah S., Ruth and Lyman T. Charles died in his eighth year. George W. married Nellie O. Bryan, and has three children, John, Grace, and Albert; they reside in Arizona. Mr. Todd died May 10, 1892, mourned by a bereaved family. Mrs. Todd's father, Col. Martin Joiner, was born in Vermont in 1771. His second marriage was with Mrs. Hattie Hoyt (nee Taylor) of Litchfield, Conn., and they had two children, Sophia and Amanda M., now Mrs. Johnson. The family came to Henrietta, Monroe county, in 1832, and he was a colonel in the war of 1812, being in the battle of Plattsburg. He died June 9, 1861, and his wife in 1873. The ancestry of this family is French on the paternal side, and English on the maternal.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 51 - 52

Newton, William, was born in Henrietta in 1835. He is a son of Thomas Newton, a native of Lincolnshire, England, who was born in 1783, and whose parents were William and Elizabeth Newton of England. Thomas Newton was obliged to work his own way in life at an early age. In 1822 he came America, spent two years in Albany, and assisted in the construction of the Erie Canal. In 1824 he married Elizabeth Bladen, who was born in Derbyshire, England, in 1800, and who came to America in 1819. He then came to Henrietta and bought a farm on which he re- sided until his death in 1873. His wife died in 1393 at the home of William Newton. Their children were Thomas, Elizabeth, who died young; William and John, of whom William is the only survivor. He received an academic education and began teaching school. This continued during eight winters, while he worked at farming in the summer. In 1862 he married Emily F., daughter of Benjamin D. and Anna (Sternberg) Schuyler of this town, she also having been a teacher for several years. He then removed to his present farm and for some years was interested in breeding Berkshire swine. In 1865 the Department of Agriculture at Washington sent him some Probsteier oats, the variety having been received from Hamburg, Germany. From the small quantity sent him he was in a few years raising large quantities, and by advertising and exhibiting them at fairs, he sold and distributed them through nearly every State and territory in the Union. They are now more extensively raised than any other variety, having become the common oat in most sections. To him is due the credit of having introduced this celebrated oat throughout the United States. Mr. Newton is now serving his third term as justice of the peace. He has five daughters: Mary F., a teacher of Spring Valley, N. Y.; Carrie D., wife of W. F. Hinds of Rochester; Ella J., wife of F. W. Mellars of San Francisco, Cal.; Martha, who is a teacher at Flatlands, L. I., and Alice E.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 52

Hiscock, George W., a son of pioneer William Hiscock and his wife, Dorothy. George was born July 4, 1813, and was for many years one of Ogden's prominent and successful farmers, and invariably respected wherever known, having also served his town as assessor. During the war he was an earnest Republican, and one of Lincoln's greatest admirers. He attended the Congregational church, which he also supported, as did his wife, Caroline E., daughter of John Brigham. The latter was a pioneer also in the town. Mr. and Mrs. George W. Hiscock had four children: Franklin, who died in infancy; Emily F., who married James F. Heacock; Alice S., who married Myron H. Davis, of Chili, and is now deceased; and George U., who resides on the old homestead in Ogden. Mr. Hiscock died in Ogden in October, 1879. George L. was born November 8, 1860, and has always lived on the same farm, succeeding his father in its ownership. November 16, 1881, he married Henrietta M.. daughter of Servetus and Margaret Wilmot, of Spencerport, and their two children are Florence Alice, aged twelve years, and Herbert Wilmot, aged seven years, both living


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 52 - 53

Lincoln, George W., the last and youngest of a family of five children, a well-known resident of Henrietta, was born in Stillwater in 1823, a son of William and Rachael (Works) Lincoln; William was one of three sons born to William of New Hampshire, the father being a farmer and butcher, who came to Rochester about 1825, where for a time he was in the meat market business. He later removed to Henrietta, settled on a farm, and died here when yet a young man, in 1832, his wife dying in 1840. Our subject has devoted his life to farming business in Henrietta, and since 1848 he has provided and cared for his aunt, Eliza Works, his mother's youngest sister, who in turn has been his housekeeper many years. She is now a remarkable old lady of over 101 years, and one of the most remarkable personages in this town, or in fact in the county. The youthful, mental and physical vigor which she has retained make her a person looked to with much attention and pride by the citizens of this section. She was born in Westmoreland, N. H., January 8, 1794, a daughter of Samuel and Susan (Chandler) Works of that State. Her father died when she was an infant and her mother when she was thirteen. She then went to live with a married sister, Mrs. Susan Marsh in Vermont. and later with her youngest brother, James Works, who lived to be nearly 101 years old. In 1814 she came with this brother to Rochester, being nine days on the road, where she lived for a number of years with her oldest brother, Samuel, who was a prominent man of that city. After he removed to Lockport she remained in Rochester and for many years was a tailoress, and she can now remember when there were but two or three stores in the place, and no sidewalks. Incidents of the strife of 1812 are yet fresh in her mind. She has resided in Henrietta since about 1848, where she has ever since kept house for her nephew, George Lincoln, doing all her housework, cooking, etc. She has made several trips to Vermont to visit her friends and relatives. She was educated at Keene, N. H., and while a little girl before 1800, she would walk over two miles to school with her oldest brother who would carry her when she became tired. One brother of George W. Lincoln, A. B., was a lieutenant in the U. S. army, a graduate of West Point in 1845, and went through the Mexican war, where he was wounded, and died in Florida in 1852.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 53

Edmunds, William J., was born in Brighton, October 24, 1834. His father, Lewis, was born in Lewis county, and the grandfather, Eliphalet, settled in Brighton in 1824, being a pensioner of the Revolutionary war. He was a direct descendant of James Edmunds, who came from England and settled near Providence, R. I., about 1670. Lewis followed his father to Brighton in 1826, and in 1844 came to Sweden. He married Maria, daughter of Bradford Lisk, and of their five children three survive; Charles and George of Clarkson, and William J., the youngest. He was educated in the district school and the Brockport Collegiate Institute. In 1857 he married Luania Wadsworth, who died March 3, 1882. Their children are Mrs. Evalyn Chapman, of Gaines, Orleans county, and Joseph W., of Sioux Falls, S. D. For his second wife he married Electa E. Wadsworth in 1883. The subject has held several town offices, was supervisor during the years 1877, '80 and '81, and has taken an interest in all matters tending to the growth of the community.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 53 - 54

Smith, Henry, the head of a large and prominent family of Parma, was a native of England, born in 1800, and came to America about 1835 with his family of seven children. He was three times married, and was the father of fourteen children, among them being George, Harriet, Charlotte, Stephen, William, Rebecca, Elizabeth, Caroline, Lydia, Frank, James, Peter. George Smith married Eliza Berridge when twenty-seven years of age, his wife being twenty. They both came from England with their parents when about fourteen years of age. They first went to keeping house about half a mile west of Braddock's Bay. One year from that time he bought a farm on the southeast corner in Unionville, lived there five years and traded for a farm in North Parma, near the west town line; lived there ten years, traded that for a farm one mile north of Parma Corners; lived there about fifteen years. He then moved on his wife's place on the east side of the road. He lived there until his death, which occurred December 6, 1893. Like his father, he was a hard working man, devoted to the good of the community; a lifelong member of the Freewill Baptist church at North Parma, he did all he could for the good of the cause. His children were William H., Charles R., Mary J., Margaret F.. George A., Rosa A., Delos D. and Jessie M. The youngest daughter, Jessie, died when twenty years of age. Charles R. Smith was born in 1850 at North Parma, and began doing for himself when twenty-one years of age by working out by the month. He was married when twenty-three years of age to Mary E. Diver, of Parma, on the 25th day of December, 1873; started for himself on John Van Voorhis's farm, situated one-half mile west of West Greece, and worked it on shares for eight years. He then bought the farm known as the Silas F. Smith farm in the town of Ogden, in 1882, containing 100 acres. He has made a great many improvements on the farm since. They have had three children: Willie L., Ida E., and Anna R. Willie L., their oldest child, died May 29, 1888, when twelve years and seven months old. The remainder of his family are all members of the M. E. church at Spencerport. He is one of the officers of the church, and is a strong advocate of the cause of temperance.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 54 - 55

Palmer Family, The. - Among the earliest settlers of the town of Perinton, were Ira Palmer and his wife, Sarah Beilby, who came from Chatham, Columbia county, N. Y., in 1807, and settled on the farm which they cleared and on which they lived until the time of their death, in 1863 and 1865. They were of English descent, his family coming from New England, and hers from Nova Scotia. They reared a family of twelve children, all of whom, except two, settled in town, bearing no small part in its history and development. There children were Polly, married Locke Moore, seven children, died in 1876; Orin, married Sally Marks, seven children, died in 1875; Betsey married Lewis Hutchinson, seven children, died in 1849; John, married Euphemia Bishop, two children, died in 1890; Sally, married Ira Johnson, two children, died in 1864; William, married Parmelia Heath, seven children; Myron, married Margaret Conklin, three children, died in 1884; Seymour, married Hannah Slocum, one child; Harvey, married Frances Sands, no children, died in 1877; Lydia, unmarried, living at the old homestead; Andrew, unmarried, died in 1849; Albert, married Sarah Fellows, one child (not living), lives on the old homestead. Of the younger generation, there are but two grandsons living who bear the name of Palmer: Edwin Palmer, Fairport, manufacturer of sash, doors and blinds, and A. Worth Palmer, dealer in farm produce. Formerly a teacher, educated at Cornell University, he was in 1893 elected school commissioner of the First Commissioner District of Monroe county. With these two this once large family will disappear from the town, they having no sons living.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 55

Adams, James, was born in England, June 5, 1830, a son of James Adams, a settler in Sweden in 1831. The father bought a small piece of land in Brockport, and succeeded in paying for it, but through an error in the title, lost it and was forced to begin anew, eventually accumulating a fair property before his death. His children were Elizabeth, who died aged twenty-four; James; John, who was drowned in Kalamazoo River; and Mary, who married Myron Colby, and lives in Medina. James, jr., was brought up to farm work, though for a time he taught school in the county. He also learned surveying, and his services were in constant demand for many years, for he was regarded as reliable and accurate. He began his business career at the age of twenty-three, and was very successful, the farm which he owned at the time of his death (June 10, 1888) having been one of the best in the town. This was the old Niles place, purchased by Mr. Adams in 1876, though he remodeled the buildings and otherwise improved the property. He held the offices of assessor, commissioner of highways, inspector of elections, and was also notary In 1854 James Adams married Ilona Cooley, of Sweden, and their children are Clara, who died aged eighteen; Minnie, wife of Augustus Fairbanks; Lewis W., of Ogden, a justice of the peace; Milo and Elmer, both of Ogden.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 55 - 56

Webster, William and John, came from Massachusetts and settled in Parma, their father, John, following soon after. He had five children, and of these Hannah William, John and Thomas came to this county, and Jesse settled in Ohio. Thomas married first, Julia Webster, and had three children who reached maturity: Cynthia S., Philetus, and Sarah Diantha; his second wife was Charlotte Webster, and she bore him one child, Josephine; his third wife was Mary Lawrence, who had no children. Cynthia S. married Elon Baldwin, and had five children, Thomas, Henry, Cordelia, Frank and Annette; she lived and died on part of the old homestead in 1892, aged seventy-four. Sarah Diantha married B. L. Nutt, and they are both living in Plymouth, Wis. Josephine married Frank French, and removed to Michigan, where both died in 1885; since that time their daughter Minnie died, leaving two children: their son, Charles, is still living. Thomas Webster settled on the town line of Parma and Ogden, where died in 1868, aged seventy-six. William Webster married Sarah Snow, and had these children: James S., Roxana, Marvin, Lorenzo, Eli, Henry, Horatio, and Sarah; the latter is the only one living. William died in 1862. John Webster married Polly Webster, and had six children: Freeman, Salmina, Riley, Otis, James, and Milo, the latter only surviving. John Webster died in 1853. Philetus Webster was born in Parma, January 11, 1843, and married Arvilla Webster, by whom he had one child, Julia, wife of George H. Davis, of Parma. His second wife, whom he married in 1851, was Annette E. Webster, and of their two children, one survives, George T. of Parma. Both Philetus and his wife are members of long standing in the M. E. church, where he has served as trustee, steward, treasurer, etc. Leon P. is a son of George H. and Julia (Webster) Davis. George T., son of Philetus Webster, married Alice Wood, and lives on a part of the old farm.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 56

Olney, Harrison, was born in Victor in 1822. His parents were Joseph and Mercy (Noble) Olney, the former having come from Chenango county in 1819. He was a native of Rhode Island; his mother, also, came from Chenango county. In 1823 the family moved to Mendon, where they reared seven children, of whom the oldest son, Jonathan F., died in Pittsford, in 1891, and the youngest daughter, Mrs. Sarah Gibson, wife of Zorton H. Gibson, died in 1892. Franklin resides in Fairport; Cyrus in Spokane Falls; John in Victor; Mrs. Win. H. Armstrong in Pittsford. Harrison Olney has lived on the homestead since 1823. He was educated in the Mendon Academy and in Rochester Collegiate Institute. His father died in 1868.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 56

Beedle, Zenas Paine, was born in the town of Sweden, January 26, 1822, a son of John Beedle, who was born in Bath, Grafton county, N. H., April 30, 1798, and re- moved with his parents to Oneida county, N. Y., soon after. In 1807 he, with an older brother, came to the Genesee country, near what is now the village of Perry, and in September, 1809, he with his brother Robert, came to this town and settled on a farm at Sweden Center, later known as the Mark Genne farm. In December, 1817, he married Abigail Bentley, daughter of Samuel Bentley, also of New England birth, with whom he lived for more than fifty-three years. There were born to them eleven children, of whom nine attained adult age, and seven of the latter still survive and are settled in different sections of the country; he was a prominent and successful farmer and a local preacher of the M. E. church; he died in Sweden in 1872, in the seventy-third year of his age, enabled to look back upon a life well spent in labors of love and benevolence in the interest of his fellow men. Zenas Paine Beedle was educated in the common schools of his native town, and in February, 1854, married Emily O., daughter of Horatio Davis, of Riga, N. Y. Four children were born to them, namely: Walter D., of Pavilion, N. Y.: Carrie L. Day, of Buffalo; John Edward, of Sweden; and Emily A., who died in December, 1874. Choosing farming as an occupation, by industry and frugality has acquired a farm of over 200 hundred acres of fertile land, the management of which he has given over to his son, John Edward, and upon which they now reside, which furnishes a competence and comfort in declining years. In 1860 he was elected to the office of justice of the peace, which office he held for twenty-eight years consecutively. He has always taken a lively interest in all enterprises pertaining to good order and improvement in the community, and liberally contributed to all benevolent objects in society, and enjoys the respect and esteem of the community in which he lives.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 56 - 57

Goss, Hon. George A., one of the foremost figures in the political and social life of Pittsford, and at present its representative in the county legislature, was born here in 1836. Ephraim Goss, his father, was also a man of much note, and by profession a lawyer. He was a justice for thirty years, county clerk in 1836, justice of sessions, and senator in 1860 - 61. George was educated at Rochester with the intent of entering his father's profession, but decided upon a mercantile life, and in 1870 he engaged in the coal and lumber trade in Fairport, the firm being Vanderhoof, Goss & Co.; later he sold out his interest to his partners, but continued in business at Fairport for several years on his own account, dealing largely in farm produce. In 1872-3-4 Mr. Goss represented his district in the Assembly, where he was recognized not only as an able legislator, but as a gentleman of sterling character and worth. In 1876 - 77 he was sergeant-at-arms of the Assembly, and held the same position in the State Senate in 1884 - 85. Mr. Goss has acceptably and repeatedly filled nearly all the offices within the gift of his townsmen and has been supervisor for twelve years, and chairman of the board in 1876-7-8-9. It is needless to say he is a staunch Republican. In 1880 he married Kate, daughter of Henry Billinghurst of Pittsford.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 57

Boyd, Andrew, was born in Ireland August 23, 1838, of Scottish descent, a son of Thomas C., who came to Port Hope, Canada, in 1845 and later to Brockport, where he engaged in lumbering. Andrew was educated in the common schools, and is a self made man. In May, 1862, he engaged in the flour and feed business and the same year, August 6, enlisted in Co. H, 108th N. Y. Vols., participating in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, etc., and was wounded on May 10, 1864. He rejoined his regiment in July, receiving the rank of second lieutenant, and of first lieutenant December 9, 1864. February 9, 1865, he was commissioned captain and appointed aid-de-camp on General Smythe's staff April 3, 1865. He was in all the battles with the regiment from July, 1864, to the surrender at Appomattox. He was honorably discharged May 28, 1865, and returned to Brockport, where he entered the employ of George R. Ward; in 1874, establishing himself in the grocery business, where he has since remained. In 1865 he married Mariette Webster, and their children are George R., Grace P., and Mabel W.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 57 - 58

Root, Frederick P., was born in Saratoga county, N. Y., October 23, 1814. His father, Aaron, was a native of Hebron, Conn., and the family trace their descent to William Root, who came from England in 1640, settled first in Massachusetts, but removed at an early day to Hartford, Conn. Aaron married Salinda Phelps of Hebron, where both were born and reared. They removed to Carlton, Saratoga county, early in life, but subsequently to Monroe county, where they settled on a farm in the town of Sweden, where their descendants now reside. He died in 1832, at the age of forty-five, leaving a family of eight children. Frederick P., the eldest son and the subject of this sketch, was educated in the common schools, and at the age of eighteen years assumed the management of the farm of 300 acres, which by the will of his father was shared equally by his children at maturity. He married, in 1839, Marion E. Phelps, at New London, Conn., who died in 1892, leaving two daughters. He married second Harriet A., daughter of Deacon Wm. White, who settled in the town of Bergen in 1808. Of Frederick P. Root, it may be said that he has been a successful farmer; his farm contains about 700 acres. His experience in farming has given him the reputation of an authority in agricultural matters, as many articles over his name in agricultural papers go to prove. He has also been quite prominent in public affairs of town and State, having been justice of the peace, supervisor five years, assemblyman two years, assessor of internal revenue five years during the Civil war. He has also been an active supporter of agricultural societies, and has been distinguished as a supporter of organizations for the elevation of the farming class throughout the county and State. He was one of the originators and organizers of the Farmer's Alliance, and first president of the county and State societies. This association of farmers, originating in Monroe county, extended to other States, until it has a national character of considerable political influence. He was one of the organizers of the association of Co-operative Fire Insurance Companies of the State of New York, and first president for five years. and has been president of Monroe County Patrons Fire Relief Association during its existence of seventeen years. Mr. Root has been during his life a liberal supporter of society, and ever ready to respond to the call of public and private charities.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 58

Todd, David, was born in Peekskill, Westchester county, April 15, 1820, was educated in the schools of his day, worked on his father's farm until he was twenty- three, and has followed farming ever since. December 6, 1843, he married Eliza Speer, formerly of Michigan. Two children were born to them: Mary F. and Sarah E. Mary F. resides with her father in Rochester. Sarah E. married Thomas P. Pryor of Rochester, and they have four children: Dean T., C. Warrant, Mary F., and Willard L. They reside on the old homestead on the Little Ridge Road, west of Greece village. Mrs. Todd died May 11, 1882. In September, 1887, Mr. Todd retired and now resides in Rochester. He has followed a life of sobriety, industry, thrift and good judgment. His father, Wright, was born in Peekskill, February 14, 1798, and married Elizabeth Denike of his native county, born in 1801. They had seven children: David; John, who died recently; Sylvester, who died in Peekskill; Albert, who resides in Ypsilanti, Mich.; Jackson and Mary A. died on the homestead when young; and Orrin W. The family came to Lyons, Wayne county, in 1826, where they remained seven months, then removed to Greece on the Big Ridge Road farm, where Orrin W. now resides. They have been residents of the town and county sixty-nine years, their first abode having been a log cabin. The grandfather Denike was a soldier in the war of 1812. Wright Todd retired about 1864 and resided in Rochester until his death, April 12, 1875; his wife died January 17, 1876. The ancestry of the family is English and Scotch.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 58 - 59

Graves, Allen S., was born of an old Massachusetts family, who came from New England at an early day, having made an honorable record in the war for independence. Elias Graves, the grandfather, son of Elias, was the father of nine children. One of these was Francis, who married Sarah A. Palmer, and came to Mendon in 1825. He learned the tanner's trade in Greene county, at the foot of the Catskill Mountains, and was employed by Colonel Edwards, and also by Jacob Graves, at Rochester, as foreman over thirty hands. He bought the farm in Mendon, now occupied by Allen S. Graves and his sister, Mrs. Dennis Desmond. His family consisted of seven children. One brother, Palmer, died at the age of thirty, and there are now in this locality Edwin, Allen, and Mrs. Desmond. The father died in 1869, and the mother in 1874. One daughter died in infancy, and two others, Abi and Lodeema, on reaching womanhood. Allen S. married Catherine Warren. by whom he had one daughter, Lodeema, who died at the age of eight years, the mother dying about two years later. His second wife was Margaret Brady of Parma, by whom there are one son and four daughters now living: Francis, Emily, Josephine, Cora Ann, and M. Almeda, some of whom are teachers of acknowledged ability. As regards serving the town, Allen Graves has been chosen twelve consecutive years as assessor. He has been offered the nomination for supervisor by both parties, but declined to accept.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 59

Wilcox, Elias (deceased), was born in the town of Rush, May 17, 1806, a son of Stephen, who came from Connecticut about 1803; the latter married Dorcas Davis, of the same State, and came from their eastern home with an ox team and wagon, such as pioneers traveled with in those days, and were six weeks on the road. After farming a few years he invested what he had in boating on the Erie Canal. finally losing all by the sinking of his boats, heavily loaded with wheat. Then his son Elias, at the age of twenty one, took charge of the family - a mother and six sisters. He removed to Gaines, Orleans county, and contracted by article for a piece of land,, and in a few years became the owner of a beautiful farm of one hundred acres. He sold this for a good sum, and went into the milling business. About this time (1855) he married Jane, the daughter of Samuel B. Perkins, born in Henrietta, Monroe county. After leaving milling he moved into Lockport and engaged in the brokerage business for three years. He then removed to Avon Springs and settled on a fine twenty acre lot just south of West Avon, remaining there two years. Having an opportunity to sell at a bargain, he returned to Monroe county and retired from active business, having accumulated a handsome property by indomitable perseverance and close management, never having received three months' schooling; having a head for business, he was often consulted by men of learning, at one time sueing the State and gaining his point. He always took a prominent part in town and county affairs, and died in 1890, in his eighty-fourth year. His widow and two children survive him - Elias and Jennie D., still residents of Brockport.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 161

HON. HALBERT S. GREENLEAF

Halbert Greenleaf Halbert Stevens Greenleaf, of this city, was born in Guilford, Vermont, April 12, 1827. The descent of the Greenleaf family of New England is traced from the Huguenots, who, when persecuted in France for their religion, fled from the country during the middle of the sixteenth century. The name was originally Fuillevert, anglicized Greenleaf, in which it occurs in England towards the close of the sixteenth century. The common ancestor of the Greenleaf family of America was one Edward Greenleaf, a silk dyer by trade, a native of the parish of Brixham in the County of Devonshire, England, where he was born in 1600. Some time after his marriage he came to America, first settling in Newbury, Massachusetts, but later in Boston, where he died in 1671. A number of the Greenleaf family in this country have distinguished themselves as scholars and patriots. Colonel Greenleaf, the subject of this sketch, was carefully reared and educated in the best schools of his native state. As a young man he engaged in manual service and later was a school teacher. At the age of twenty-three he made a six-months' sea voyage, serving before the mast as a common sailor. Soon after his return he married Miss Jennie F. Brooks, a most worthy and attractive young lady of Bernardston, Massachusetts, and shortly after took up his home at Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, where he became a day laborer at the bench in a large cutlery manufactory. Subsequently he took a position in the office of a neighboring manufactory and soon became its manager and ere long a member of the firm of Miller & Greenleaf. Early in 1856 Mr. Greenleaf was commissioned by the Governor of Massachusetts a justice of the peace, being one of the youngest, if not the youngest, magistrate in the state not a member of the legal profession. The year following Mr. Greenleaf was elected captain of a military company in Shelburne Falls, which post of honor he held until March, 1859, when, because of business engagements, he resigned his commission. During this year he became a member of the firm of Linus Yale, Jr., & Company, Philadelphia, and took up his residence in that city until 1861, when he returned to Shelburne Falls and organized the Yale & Greenleaf Lock company, of which he became business manager. In August, 1862, Mr. Greenleaf enlisted as a private soldier in the Union army; subsequently he was commissioned captain in the Fifty-second Massachusetts regiment, aiding by his influence and money most materially in organizing and recruiting this command. After a few months he was unanimously elected colonel of the regiment and with the latter subsequently served with General Banks in the Department of the Gulf. As a soldier who went forth in defense of his country and fought in the great struggle, Colonel Greenleaf's record forms a most honorable and praiseworthy part in the history of that period. At the expiration of his term of military service Colonel Greenleaf was offered, and accepted, the command of the government steamer Colonel Benedict, on the lower Mississippi. When the war ended he took charge of the extensive salt works on Petite Anse Isle, St. Mary's parish, Louisiana, but in June, 1867, he removed to Rochester, and the month following the firm of Sargent & Greenleaf was organized. The great success of the enterprise with which Colonel Greenleaf is associated is a part of the business history of the Flower city since the year mentioned, and in this connection needs no further explanation. He is also engaged in farming and stock raising. As a gentleman in public life Colonel Greenleaf is known extensively. In politics he is a Democrat, and yet not so strongly partisan in faith as not to possess hosts of friends outside of his own party. He is very popular with the soldier element, and in 1882 was elected commander of the First New York Veteran brigade with the rank of brigadier-general, and was unanimously reelected to that position in January, 1883. Colonel Greenleaf has never been an office-seeker, hut in the Autumn of 1882 he was elected to Congress from the Thirtieth district by a large majority. As a candidate for the Forty-ninth Congress, he was defeated by Mr. Baker. He was elected to the Fifty-second Congress, and his services during both terms were valuable in a high degree. He is at present a member of the Board of Trustees of the Rochester Savings bank, of the Rochester Park commission, of the St. Lawrence university at Canton, and of the Soldiers' and Sailors' home at Bath.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 162

JEAN BROOKS GREENLEAF

Jean GreenleafJean Brooks Greenleaf was born October 1, 1831, in the village of Bernardston, Massachusetts. She was the youngest daughter of Dr. John Brooks, who had more than a local reputation as a man of advanced ideas for his day, and was a tenacious defender of whatever he deemed to be true and just, whether popular or not. He strove to impress upon his children at an early age a strong love of liberty and of country, and ever encouraged them in independent thinking. Mrs. Brooks was a woman of heroic mold, domestic in habit and devoted to her children. Being many years younger than her sisters, and her mother always an invalid after her birth, Jean left school at the age of seventeen and assumed largely the care and responsibility of the family household. She had previously attended the public school and academy in her native town, and Melrose seminary, West Brattleboro, Vermont. At the age of twenty she married Halbert Stevens Greenleaf, of Guilford, Vermont, and resided for a few years in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts. Her early life was uneventful. Being something of an invalid she shrank from general society, and found her chief happiness in the home circle. The outbreak of the civil war roused her, as it did most other women, to engage actively in work for the comfort of the Union soldiers, and when Colonel Greenleaf took his part in the struggle for the preservation of the Nation's life she was ready to aid him in the discharge of his duty to the extent of her ability. Near the close of the war her home was in New Orleans, and it was while visiting the camps and hospitals of that city that she learned for the first time what war really meant. Having visited the South before the war, she knew the effect of slavery on both the dominant and subject classes. Her abhorrence of the institution was so strong, her love for the foundation of this Government so great, that even the horrors of war appeared to her less dreadful than a forced continuance of the unnatural union of liberty and slavery. After the struggle closed Mrs. Greenleaf went with her husband to reside in Southwestern Louisiana, and took great interest during the one or two years spent there in the efforts made to solve the problems of the new conditions of society in that locality. From Louisiana a removal was made in 1867 to Rochester, New York, which city has since been her home. Always an unswerving believer in equal rights for all, the inconsistent treatment of her own sex by a government professedly founded on the the theory that "governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed," led her to ever unhesitatingly declare herself a "woman suffragist." Ill health, however, prevented Mrs. Greenleaf from participation in active work toward establishing a more equitable political status for woman until 1887, when she joined the Political Equality club of Rochester. Since then she has devoted whatever time could be spared from her domestic duties to such work. She was for three years president of the local organization, and for four years has held the presidency of the State Woman Suffrage association. Greatly interested in all work for the elevation and advancement of the human family, the efforts made to that end by the Woman's Christian association, the Rochester Atheneum and Mechanics' Institute, the Industrial Educational and Protective union, the Woman's Ethical club, and by the Humane society, are full of interest to her. But the creation of a more ethical political condition generally, is to her paramount to all other worldly objects, and to the work of securing this ideal she desires to devote the remaining years of her life.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
pages 162 - 163

SUSAN B. ANTHONY

Susan AnthonySusan B. Anthony was born in South Adams, Massachusetts, February 15, 1820. Her father, Daniel Anthony, a cotton manufacturer, was a liberal Quaker who educated his daughter by private teachers to be self-supporting. Her education was completed at a Friends' boarding school in Philadelphia. Miss Anthony taught school in this State from 1835 to 1850. In 1845 her father settled in this city and two years later she made her first public speech, the subject being temperance. From that time until the present she has been working in the cause of temperance and other public reforms. In 1851 she called a temperance convention in Albany, having been refused admission to a previous convention because of her sex. In 1852, assisted by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, site organized the Woman's New York State Temperance society. In 1857 she became prominent among the agitators for the abolition of slavery, but the chief work of her life has been in connection with the movement to obtain for women equal political rights to those enjoyed by men, In 1868, associated with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Parker Pillsbury and George Francis Train, she began the publication in New York city of a weekly paper called The Revolution, and devoted to the enfranchisement of women. In 1872 Miss Anthony cast a ballot at the congressional election in this city, her purpose being to test the application of the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments to the constitution. She was indicted for illegal voting, denied the right of trial by jury, and sentenced by Associate Justice Hunt of the United States Court to pay a fine of one hundred dollars. But she never paid the fine. In 1881 with the assistance of her co-editors, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Matilda Joslyn Gage, she published the History of Woman Suffrage, in three volumes. In 1888 Miss Anthony was the prime mover and manager of the Woman's International Council which met at Washington, D. C., in March, to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the first Woman's Rights convention. When, in 1891, Mrs. Stanton retired from the presidency of the National American Woman Suffrage association, Miss Anthony was chosen as her successor. She started and led the movement to induce the New York constitutional convention to submit an amendment to the people granting woman suffrage.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 163

M. JEANETTE BALLANTYNE

M. Jeanette BallantyneM. Jeanette Ballantyne was born and educated in Monroe county, New York, and is the second daughter of the late William Ballantyne and Mary R. McCauley of Scottsville. She is of Scotch descent. The late Samuel Ballantyne, her grandfather, was one of the first settlers of Rochester, having removed here from York, Pennsylvania, in the year 1812, and located on a farm on what is now Genesee street. He broke the ground where the Powers block now stands. At the age of two years Miss Ballantyne lost her mother, but her eldest brother, the late Thomas McCauley Ballantyne, president of Cumberland college, Princeton, Kentucky, directed her education. Beginning her studies in the district school of Scottsville, she was graduated from the Rochester Female academy. After graduation Miss Ballantyne took up the teacher's profession and taught first in the district schools of Monroe county, later in the graded schools of Ohio, and finally became a member of the faculty of the Omaha Collegiate institute at Omaha, Nebraska. Although successful as an instructor Miss Ballantyne decided to abandon the teacher's profession and take up the study of shorthand, entering the office of Messrs. Osgoodby and Duffield. in October, 1878, she was appointed by ex-Surrogate W. Dean Shuart official stenographer for the Monroe County Surrogate's court, being the second woman appointed to such a position in the State of New York, and the third in the United States. The first case she reported was the Abelard Reynolds will contest, a complicated and protracted litigation, and the skill and ability with which she acquitted herself elicited warm praise from the attorneys connected with the case. Since September, 1885, she has been engaged in a general stenographic business in the Powers building, and is also principal of the Shorthand Technic institute. She is a member of the New York State Stenographers' association, and has contributed largely to its proceedings by presenting valuable papers at its yearly meetings. Miss Ballantyne was a delegate to the World's Congress of stenographers that convened at Chicago in July, 1893, contributing a paper entitled "Early Stenographers, Men and Women," which was well received it contained many valuable references both to ancient and modern stenographic literature. Miss Ballantyne is an enthusiast in matters pertaining to shorthand and typewriting, and is now preparing a book for publication entitled Compendium of Legal Typewriting.

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