Biographies of Monroe County People
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From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 104

Stone, Harvey, was born in Leyden, Lewis county in 1814, a son of Timothy, born in Madison, Conn., in 1770, who served in the war of 1812, and in the battle of Sackett's Harbor. In 1798 he removed to Leyden, with his family, and made a home in the forest, erecting a log house, which he covered with hark from the trees, and a blanket served as a door, and they endured all the privations and trials incident to a pioneer life. About 1837 he removed to Henrietta, where he died in 1851. He was three times married, and by his second wife, Abigail Miller, had ten children. His third wife was Louisa Dewey of Connecticut. Our subject began for himself, traveling on the road with goods, and in 1835 went to Avon, thence to Honeoye Falls, where he spent a year, and then to this town, where he has remained. He bought his first farm there in 1834. Mr. Stone married Triphena Belknap of Lewis county, and their children are as follows: Mrs. Eliza Marsh, of this town; and Alfred, horn in 1841. He married, second, Mary Ann Bundy, of Otego, a daughter of James and Polly (Overhiser) Bundy, by whom he has these children: Mrs. Lucretia B. Winslow, of Henrietta, Caroline T., deceased. and Mrs. Susan E. Hall, of Corry, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Stone are members of the Baptist church of this town, in which Mr. Stone has served as deacon for over forty years.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 104

Woolston, W. J., must be reckoned among the enlightened and progessive farmers of Pittsford, and one whose character tends to ennoble and elevate that calling to its proper position, although but recently become a resident of the town, He was born in Victor, Ontario county, March 1, 1847, where his father, William Woolston, was also horn, and where his grandfather, Joseph Woolston settled in 1808, removing there from Camden, N. J. Joseph was a pensioner of the war of 1812. His son William, first became prominent in his vicinity for business and counsel on matters in general in Ontario county, in the Baptist church, and in the Republican party, and he served in various town offices. His wife was Laura Andrews of Delaware county, and six of their children reached mature age: B. Franklin, John A., Laura A., Miranda C., William J. and Daniel D., all now living. Our subject first engaged in farming at Mendon, having acquired a sound business education at Albion, Mich. In 1869 he married Sarah A. Corby, of Mendon Center, who died in 1873, leaving one child, Louis. In 1875 he married Clara Dawley, who was the mother of A. Laura, and Clarence B. In 1890 Mr. Woolston purchased the choice farm of 175 acres where he now lives. He is an active member of the order of the Patrons of Husbandry.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 104 - 105

Farnam, George W., a highly esteemed citizen of Pittsford, was born at Scipio, Caynga county, October 10, 1842, a son of George W., and grandson of Jeffrey Farnam. The latter was of Connecticut birth and early came to Caynga county. His wife attained the age of ninety-eight and reared a family of eleven children. George was a resident of Victor at the outbreak of the war, and in the summer of 1862 enlisted in Co. K, 1st N. Y. Mounted Rifles, an independent organization, which participated in the hardest conflicts. During his three years of army life Mr. Farnam's horse was twice wounded under him, but he escaped injury. In the early part of 1864 was attached to 18th Corps headquarters as orderly, and in the winter of 1864-65 was at General Butler's headquarters, and remained in the service till June, 1865. Returning home he has since resided on the farm purchased by his father in 1865, near Pittsford, and in December of the following year married Lucy Shepard of this town, and their children are: Amelia, wife of Delos Loughborough of Batavia; Frank L., a grocer, of Rochester, and Alfred H. of Pittsford.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 105

Cole, Cornelius S., was born in Schoharie county August 8, 1816, a son of William and Anna (Osterhout) Cole. When Cornelius was a year old his parents removed to Canada, and thence to Pittsford in 1818. In 1822 moved to the town of Webster, Monroe county, N. Y. In this town the young life of our subject was passed. At the age of about seventeen he became a carpenter and joiner, at which he worked nearly twenty years. In connection with this work he was in Niagara county, and there became interested in fruit growing. Having acquired a knowledge of this business, he came to Spencerport in 1853, planted a nursery of about ten acres, and from this small beginning developed an extensive and highly successful business, and one which occupied his constant attention for nearly thirty years afterwards. About 1884 he retired from active work, and has since devoted his time to his family and to travel. However, he has never entirely laid aside his interest in public affairs. He is a zealous church worker, and has been a trustee of the Congregational church many years. In 1839 Cornelius S. Cole married Phileta E., daughter of David Rice, of Ogden, and they have had one child, George Milton, now a successful merchant of Spencerport.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 105 - 106

Millener, Joel P., was born in Cortland county in 1812, a son of Alexander and Abigail (Barton) Millener, the former serving as drummer in the Revolution, and who in 1864 was one of seven surviving Revolutionary pensioners. He died at Adams Basin March 13, 1865, aged 103 years. His wife died July 28, 1862, aged eighty-one. The father of Alexander served with the English and Americans during the French war and was with General Wolfe at Quebec. When about twenty-one Joel P. came to Rochester, where he was a ship carpenter and boat builder. He soon began business for himself, and added a saw mill to his other interests, continuing in active business until 1855, when he removed to Kingston, Canada, and for the next six years was senior member of the firm of Joel P. Millener & Co., manufacturers of axes and tools. Returning again to Rochester, he engaged in the same business with D. R. Barton, and continued two years. He then purchased the saw mill and property of J. O. Pettingill, at Adams Basin, to which place he removed, and was thereafter a resident and prominent citizen until his death, in 1886. He stood high in political circles, having been member of Assembly. He married, first, Sarah Harnden, and by her had nine children: Harriet, wife of James W. Stokes, of Milan, O.; Sarah, wife of Milton E. Holton; Helen, wife of Hiram Doty, of Ogden; William S., of Spencerport; Joel H., of Buffalo; George W., of Tonawanda; Louis N., of Lockport; Charles A., of Deseronto, Canada; and Bella, of Rochester. William S. was born in Rochester January 6, 1843, and is a graduate of the medical department of Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, class of '64. He at once entered the service as assistant surgeon of U. S. Vols., and was assigned to the 10th and 11th U. S. Inf., 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac. Resigning from the service in March, 1866, he began practice at Adams Basin, where he lived two years. He then spent about two years in the west, and returned in 1870 and purchased the drug store of E. H. Davis, at Spencerport, after which he dropped medical practice. In 1868 he married Lucy A., daughter of Alvin and Cornelia Webster, of Ogden, and their children are: Carrie C., wife of Sidney S. Nichols, of Spencerport; and William S., a druggist, of Holley.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 106 - 107

Brown, D. D. S., well-known throughout the State as a politician and publisher of the Rochester Democrat, was born at Richmond, Ontario county, N. Y., June 19, 1819, son of Parley Brown, who came from Vermont and settled at Richmond. His grandfather, Parley Brown, was killed at the battle of White Plains in the Revolutionary war, and his great-grandfather, John Brown, who resided at Leicester, Mass., was a soldier in the French and Indian wars. D. D. S. Brown received a common school education and attended the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, N. Y., after which he taught school and studied law. While teaching school, he taught two years at Mumford in this town; and was for a time superintendent of the schools of Wheatland. After being admitted to the bar he was appointed collector of tolls on the Genesee Valley Canal at Scottsville, and in 1847 settled in Scottsville to attend to those duties, and at the same time commenced the practice of law there. For a short time he was postmaster at Scottsville, but resigned his position. In 1854 he married Mary Ann, daughter of George Ensign, an early settler in the village. In 1858 he was elected county clerk of the county of Monroe and held the position for three years. After which he resumed the practice of his profession at Scottsville, but shortly after was appointed paymaster in the army with rank of major, stationed at Louisville, Kentucky, making payments to the soldiers at Nashville. After the war he purchased the Rochester Democrat, which he published until 1870, when that paper and the Chronicle were consolidated and a stock company formed, of which he became president, and retained the office for two years. He was largely instrumental in the building of the Rochester State Line Railroad, now the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad. He was one of the railroad commissioners of the town of Wheatland. Mr. Brown was at the time of his death one of the managers of the State Industrial School at Rochester. He was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1860 that nominated Abraham Lincoln, and delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1868 which nominated U. S. Grant. Mr. Brown materially aided in the erection of Grace Episcopal church at Scottsville, and was one of its vestry at the time of his death. He died January 11, 1887, leaving his wife and four children: Selden S., Mary Lillian, wife of Homer L. S. Hall; Le Grand Brown, and Roscoe C. E. Brown. His widow, Mary A. E. Brown, died at the family residence, July 18, 1892. Mr. Brown's first residence in Scottsville, aside from boarding, was in the square house on the east side of Rochester street, being now the most northerly house on that side of the street, and is now owned by Jacob Hauszler. It was in this house that his eldest son, Selden S. Brown, was born. Afterwards Mr. Brown bought the Dr. Freeman Edson farm, lying west of Rochester street and north of the village. After purchasing this farm Brown's avenue was opened through the farm, and Mr. Brown erected his residence on the west side of that street north of the village, where he resided at the time of his death. This house is now occupied by his second son, Le Grand Brown. the shade trees which line both sides of this avenue, Beckwith avenue, which Mr. Brown opened from Brown's avenue to Rochester street, and Maple Avenue, running west from Brown's avenue to the station of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad, were planted by Mr. Brown, and renewals set in place of those dying from time to time. Selden S. Brown, son of D. D. S. Brown, was born at Scottsville, Monroe county, October 23, 1855. By attending the public schools of his native village and the Rochester Collegiate Institute he was well fitted for the higher studies of the University of Rochester, from which he graduated in 1879. After a course of legal study in the law offices of Messrs. Hubbell & McGuire, of Rochester, Mr. Brown was admitted to the bar in 1882, and the same year opened an office in that city. He has since been an active worker in his profession, being prominent both as an office attorney and as a speaker before a jury, Mr. Brown continues to reside in Scottsville, where he is school trustee and senior warden of Grace church. Mr. Brown resides in a house recently built by him on a part of the Brown homestead farm on the northwest corner of Brown's avenue and Maple avenue. Mr. Brown is also one of the railroad commissioners of the town of Wheatland, having been appointed to succeed his father at the time of his father's death. Le Grand Brown, another son of D. D. S. Brown, is a civil engineer and surveyor by profession, and as assistant was in charge of the construction of the new water works conduit to Rochester. He is also known as an expert builder of electric railways, for which he has invented many useful devices. He resides in the D. D. S. Brown homestead at Scottsville, having his office in Rochester.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 107 - 108

Briggs, Elroy W., was born in Sodus, Wayne county, August 11, 1847, a son of George W., also a native of Wayne county. The family are of Scotch descent, and landed in Massachusetts about 1650. George W. married Mary J., daughter of B. Right, and in 1885 took up his residence in Newark, Wayne county, where he was recognized as a man of sterling integrity. He died at the age of seventy-six. E. W. Briggs was educated at Marion Collegiate Institute, after which he taught a few years. In 1873 he established a drug store at Clifton Springs, and in 1891 bought the store and stock of O. L. Howard at Brockport, and is now one of the leading druggists of the town, also making a specialty of wall papers. In 1875 he married Mary E. Newland, of Clifton Springs, and they have one daughter, Mary Edith.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 108

Cogswell, Pierce J. - Prominent among the energetic and representative business men of Brighton, is P. J. Cogswell, who in 1893 completed an elegant suburban residence in this village. Mr. Cogswell was born at Mt. Vernon, Me., in 1848, son of Aaron Cogswell, a farmer and miller. In 1873 he became associated with the Bradley Fertilizer Company, and in 1874 settled at Rochester as manager of their affairs west of Albany, the company's headquarters being at Boston, Mass. Mr. Cogswell is also interested in the raising of fine Jersey cattle, and as an intelligent amateur in that direction is widely known and referred to. Among his own choice herd of about one hundred specimens are some individuals of world-wide fame. A member of the board of directors and one of the most active members of the "American Jersey Cattle Club" of New York, Mr. Cogswell has given largely of his time and means for their advancement and interest, as a member of the World's Fair Commission and in other capacities. He has for many years been a member of the Second Baptist church of Rochester, acting as trustee and one of the building committee. He is at present the president of the village. In 1869 Mr. Cogswell married Maria F. Pratt, of Mt. Vernon. He bought out the famous bull Exile of St. Lambert, which has the largest number of titled daughters of any bull the world has ever known (49).


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 108

Green, George W., was born in Pike, Wyoming county. October 8, 1825. Thrown upon his own resources at the age of fourteen years, he went to Rushford, commenced his trade with Harry Howe, and after seven years of apprenticeship, engaged in business with Mr. Howe. In 1847 Mr. Green married Matilda, daughter of John and Harmony Gordon, of Rushford and a sister of James Gordon of Fairport, Luther Gordon deceased, of Brockport, N. Y., Walter Gordon deceased, of Allegany, Cattaraugus county. N. Y., Wilson Gordon of Topeka, Kan. 1859 he moved to Angelica, and thence to Belmont, where he was six years county clerk. Later he engaged in the lumber business at Rochester. Establishing the firm of Green & McAuliffe in 1870 at Fairport, where his extensive business operations, lively public spirit and active philanthropy made him a most influential and valuable citizen. He was prominent in Masonic circles and in the church, teaching for twenty years a class in the Congregational Sunday school. His children are Adelphia G., wife of P. McAuliffe, and Ella G., now deceased, who was a highly accomplished young lady, an artist and musician. Her death, July 6, 1893, was widely mourned. Mrs. McAuliffe is the mother of George, Jessie, James, Lulu D., Anna, Ada and Gordon. Mr. Green died October 17, 1891, and was interred with Masonic honors at Mount Hope, Rochester.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 108 - 109

Andrews, L. E., was born in Windham county, Conn., a son of Timothy A. Andrews. The family are of English extraction, and were among the pioneers of Connecticut. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and is a self-made man. In 1840 he came to Monroe county and settled in Parma, removing in 1846 to Brockport, where he engaged in house painting, glazing and paper hanging, with which business he has always been identified. In 1847 he married Mary J., daughter of Cyrus Carpenter, and their children are Edward, Mrs. H., E. Smith, Mrs. J. F. Harris, Mrs. F. E. Williams and Mrs. O. D. Humphrey.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 109

Ward, George R. (deceased), was born at Le Roy, N. Y., April 13, 1837, educated in the public schools, and in 1853 came to Brockport and learned the grocery business, soon placing himself in the front rank of merchants. Meeting with reverses in the shape of fire, he scarcely paused. but cleared away the debris and started again, purchasing one of the business blocks in Brockport, which he remodeled and rebuilt, and incorporated in what is now Ward's Opera House, a lasting monument to his memory. In 1858 he married Maria Palmer, who died in 1864; one son, Albert P., now living, was born to them. In 1866 he married for his second wife, Marian L. Root, daughter of F. P. Root of Sweden, who survives him. Mr. Ward died February 8, 1889. Public spirited and foremost in every object for the advancement of his town, his death was not only a loss to his own family, but to the community in general.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)Part III, p. 109

Rowe, George H., born in the town of Greece, October 20, 1837. His father, Asa, was born in that town, in 1806, and his father, Abel Rowe, with his two brothers came from Tolland, Conn., about 1790. One of the brothers died, and the other, Frederick, settled in Gates. Asa Rowe married Rumy B., daughter of John Reed, and was one of the first nurserymen in this county, as well as a prominent farmer, serving as supervisor two terms, and was one of the building committee of the old court house. In 1842 he came to the town of Sweden, where he has been one of the most successful citizens of the town. George Rowe was educated at Alfred Academy, Allegany county, and in 1858 went to Michigan, from there to La Porte, Ind., and in 1861 enlisted in Co. G, 15th U. S. Vols., participating in the battles of Rich Mountain, Corinth, and through the campaign of West Virginia, receiving an honorable discharge in August, 1862. In 1867 he married Ruby Reed, daughter of John Reed, and they have three sons and one daughter - John W., George E., Henry A,, and Cora M.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 109

Lockwood, Mrs. M. E. - Among the local pioneers of 1832 who boldly abandoned the older civilization of New England, shaping at the same time their own destinies and the social and political affairs of a new arena, we find the name of William A. Lockwood, scion of an old family of Stamford, Conn. His oldest son, George William Lockwood married in 1857 Mary D. Wright, whose father, Francis A., was once the leading merchant of North Norwich, N. Y. The children of this union were: Ida Adella, Inez Gertrude, and William Augustus. The oldest daughter died in infancy. Inez is a resident of Fairport, and the son is employed in the office of a prominent firm in Rochester. George Lockwood's untimely death in 1873 at the age of thirty-nine was widely noted as the fatal error of a dispensing pharmacist.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 109 - 110

Kimball, Rev. Joseph, was a native of Newburgh, Orange county, born August 12, 1820, and at the age of twenty-three he was ordained as pastor of the Associate Reformed church. In 1843 he married Julia, daughter of William M. Wylie, of Newburgh, and in 1854 came to Brockport as pastor of the First Presbyterian church. In 1862 he went to Fishkill and in 1864 removed to Brooklyn, where he died in 1874. Giving freely his best energies to the service of his Master, unostentatious and unassuming, his hands were always engaged in promoting some charitable enterprise, and his voice in promoting the welfare of humanity. He was a graduate of the Union College of Schenectady and of the Theological Seminary of Newburgh. He began his life work at the age of twenty-two, and for thirty-one years his unceasing efforts were given to his chosen work.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 110

Clinton, Richard, was born in County Louth, Ireland, November 15, 1834, and came to this country at the age of eighteen. He first came to Rochester, later removed to Caledonia, and then spent about two years at lumbering in Michigan. He next spent a winter in New Orleans, La., and a summer in Illinois, then returned to this county, and bought in Ogden a portion of the old Scribner farm. In 1875 Mr. Clinton bought his present farm, where with the help of his family he established a comfortable home. August 14, 1862, he enlisted in Co. M, 8th N. Y. Cavalry, and was mustered out September 16, 1865. October 11, 1863, he was wounded in the right arm and confined to hospital nearly six months; was then transferred to the Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, with whom he remained until his discharge. Returning to Ogden, Mr. Clinton has since been a farmer, a quiet hard working man, whose efforts have been crowned with success. April 15, 1865, he married Julia Archard, of Ogden, and they have had these children: Charles, Margaret, Frederick, Mary, Jennie, Julia, Christie and Sarah.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 110

Hubbard, Richard P., is descended from the good old Revolutionary stock and was born in Salisbury, Conn., July 25, 1813, son of Josiah, whose father, Josiah Hubbard, was a sea captain. The father of Richard P. married Sarah, daughter of Elijah Stanton, who was a Revolutionary soldier and one of Washington's aides. Richard P. came to Chili in 1838, where, with the exception of a short time spent in Ontario county, he has since lived. Coming to Chili empty handed, he worked for a time on a farm, but soon purchased a small farm and started out for himself. By reason of his thrift and sound judgment he steadily gained headway and was soon counted among the leading farmers of the town. In 1864 he purchased the Whitmore farm at North Chili of 355 acres, long known as one of the finest farms in Western New York. Mr. Hubbard was for many years an auctioneer of exceptional ability. He was for nine years a director of the Monroe County Agricultural Association. January 13, 1842, he married Louisa E., daughter of William Wooden, one of the prominent pioneer men of Chili. She died June 11, 1895. His son, Richard P. Hubbard, jr., is a prominent citizen of Chili.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 110 - 111

McMillan, James, the well-known organizer and public speaker, was born of Highland Scotch ancestry at Schenectady in 1829, where his father, Alexander McMillan, was a farmer. James early developed a taste for travel, and a genius for invention and improvement. His education was largely acquired by personal research, and in addition to the ready and fluent wit for which his countrymen are famous, his fund of general information is wide and varied. When but a youth he went to Indiana and engaged in teaching and clearing land, etc., and subsequently interested himself in boring artesian wells throughout the west and this State. For the past thirty years he has been a resident of Perinton, and his voice and talent often employed to better, by organized effort, the condition of the average farmer. He is a leader in the local grange movement, and a recognized authority on agricultural and political economy. Believing in a trinity of money, gold, silver and paper, all issued by the government, and a full legal tender for all debts, public and private, and not less than sixty dollars per capita of available circulating medium. He has the honor of owning at present the celebrated thoroughbred stallion, Jas. McCauley, an inbred grand sire of imported Eclipse, England and America's pride, and Monroe county's pride and land mark. (See Bruce's American Stud Book, p. 400.) He was also one of the pioneers in educating the farmers generally how and what to feed the plants to increase their crops and improve their farms by the use of phosphates, and thorough culture; also among the first to experiment in this county in the cultivation and manufacture of syrup from sorghum, or sugar cane, which we use in the place of old wine for our health's sake. Were he to reveal his knowledge and thoughts of the past, present, and future, it would make the eyes of many of the present generation roll in their sockets like stars or planets in their spheres and their fretted locks stand on their heads like porcupine quills. He has always lived and thought in the advance of the age, and thus, like Paul, had ignorance to contend with. - Com.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 111

Fraser, Allan B., was born on Fraser's Point, near Lancaster, Glengarry county, Canada, on January 22, 1848, a son of Alexander and Margaret Fraser, his parents being of Scotch birth. Allan began for himself at the age of fifteen working in Canada until he was twenty, when he came to the States and to Chenango county, where he was employed in a public works office. He then went to Oneida county, thence to Oswego, in both of which places he was employed as foreman on the railroad, which brought him to North Parma in 1873, with his brother, E. E. Fraser, the latter a contractor on the R., W. & O. road, our subject having a fencing contract. In 1875 he formed a partnership with E. A. Cross, carrying on a general store at North Parma. About two years and a half afterwards Mr. Fraser, associated with his brother, became sole proprietor and it is now one of the largest country stores in Western New York, and one of the most successful. Mr. Fraser was president of the North Parma Creamery Company in 1894 and is now secretary and treasurer. He has also been treasurer of the village and is treasurer of the First Baptist church. In 1878 he married Ella L. Wayne, by whom he has three children. His wife died in April, 1892. He married, second, Elfreda L. Tambling, and they have one child.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 111

Curvin, John, was born in Rochester August 7, 1837, a son of John, who was a native of Queens county, Ireland, and came to this country in 1820, settled in Rochester, and married Margaret Heaney. Later they removed to the town of Chili, where he engaged in farming. He died in 1890 in his nintieth year. John Curvin was educated in the Christian Brothers' School at Rochester, and then engaged in agriculture. In 1865 he married Catherine, daughter of Gilbert Jump, who came to the town of Brighton in 1820, where he was a mason. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Curvin are: John H., Frank G., and Margaret E. Our subject is a prosperous farmer, and enjoys the esteem of his townspeople.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 111 - 112

Stubbs, Joseph, was born in Camden, Me., in 1815, of English ancestry. Camden is a semi-maritime village at the estuary of the Penobscot, and was then a flourishing center of the ship-building industry. Joseph learned the trade of ship carpenter and caulker, and has made it his business since, removing to the vicinity of Boston about 1821 and to Fairport a year later. August 29, 1852, he married Sarah L., daughter of the late Gould Warren, a millwright of Rochester, and a lineal descendant of General Warren of Revolutionary fame. Mrs. Stubbs was for twelve years engaged in the millinery and fancy goods business in the Stubbs block in Fairport.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 112

Stedman, George L., was born in Penfield September 13, 1832, a son of Lowrey Stedman, a native of Cornecticut, born in 1797. The family is of English extraction, and came to Connecticut in 1773. Lowrey married Harriet M., daughter of John V. Lemon, of Harper's Ferry, Va., and came to Rochester in 1828, and engaged in the manufacture and sale of cabinet work. Later he removed to Warsaw, where he died in 1890, in his ninety-fourth year. George L. Stedman was educated in Rochester, and learned the printer's trade, also being engaged in insurance and real estate. In 1860 he married Mary S., daughter of Robert Moore, esq., of Perry, N. Y., and they have these children: Prof. John M. Stedman, of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, of Auburn, Ala., and George L., jr., who is engaged in the railroad business. George L. Stedman came to Brockport in 1863, where he has since resided, and been identified with all local affairs of the town. Since 1857 Mr. Stedman has been engaged off and on in editorial work on different newspapers, and is writing for the press at the present time in connection with his other work.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 112

Diver, Byron A., was born in Rush, a son of Norton, whose father, Daniel, was the first of the name to come to Rush. He was born in Vermont, and came here in 1806, bought 300 acres of forest, erected a log cabin, and returned for his family. He had seven children, among whom he divided his property. His father Calvin, came here later and was buried on the farm. Norton Diver married Melissa, daughter of Isaac Jackson of Henrietta, and began housekeeping on what is known as the Charles Green farm. Of his five children, Emily R., died in 1893, Byron, as above; John H., who lives in Lima, and Chloe, widow of Henry M. Hovey of Avon, and Isaac W., who died in Rush, March 19, 1895. Norton spent his last years in Honeoye Falls. where he died in 1889, his wife dying in 1880. Byron married Maud, daughter of Matthew Stull, whose father, Jacob Stull, came here from Maryland in 1801. Matthew died in 1871 at East Rush. Our subject bought his present farm before his marriage in 1865, the place comprising 115 acres of the old homestead. He has a son, Grad, and two daughters, Melissa C. and Eva E. Mr. Diver was supervisor during 1888-89-90, being re-elected without opposition. He was also assessor six years and collector two years.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 112 - 113

Courtney, Capt. Lewis B., was born in Cortland county March 20, 1823. His father, Abyram Courtney, was a native of Chenango county, and the grandfather, William, was a soldier of the Revolution. Lewis B. was educated in the public. schools, and in 1860 came to Brockport. Rn 1862 he enlisted in Co. A, 140th N. Y. Vols., and took part in the battles of the Army of the Potomac, being present at the surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court House, and was one of two remaining officers in his regiment at the battle of Petersburg. Enlisting as a private, he was promoted second sergeant, first lieutenant, and at the close of the war held the rank of captain, bringing back but eleven of the original 100 members of his company. In 1865 he returned to Brockport and entered the employ of D. S. Morgan & Co., remaining till 1885, since which time he has been engaged in the fruit evaporating business.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 113

Leake, C. Leverne, was born in Penfield in 1872, and after being educated at Rochester and Havana, he followed his trade of engineer for a time. In February, 1893, he came to Webster, where he started a sash, door and blind factory, in connection with which he now manufactures burial caskets also. He is a son of Stephen Leake, whose father Thomas Leake, was among the earliest settlers of Penfield.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 113

Bumpus, William H., eldest son of Alexander N. Bumpus, was born in Henrietta in 1845. His father was born in New Bedford, Mass., in 1812, and with several brothers was at one time connected with the great whaling industry for which that town was noted. He was himself a carpenter by trade, and located on a farm in Henrietta in 1821. He has been of considerable social prominence, and is still living at Irondequoit. William Bumpus has been a resident of Perinton since the age of ten years, and chiefly interested in farming. March 15, 1876, he married Elizabeth White of Rochester, and their children are: Ethel aged fifteen, and Myra aged thirteen.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 113

Harris, J. D., was born at Penfield, August 30, 1848, a son of James of that town, born in 1821. His father William came here from Scotland in 1815, and his first lodging in Monroe county was where James Harris now lives, and the farm where they settled is also in the possession of a member of the family. James Harris has been and is still a representative man of the people, having been for twenty years supervisor of Penfield, justice of the peace about the same length of time, and filled besides many minor official offices. Rn 1879 he was the people's choice for county treasurer, and since the expiration of that term of office he has lived retired from active politics. He had four brothers and four sisters, all resident in Penfleld, and at the last reunion of the family more than eighty members were present. J. D. Harris is one of a family of ten, five now living. After a course at Penfield Academy he engaged in farming in that town, removing in 1878 to Perinton, near Fairport, and he is now largely engaged in the shipping of produce. May 9, 1872, he married Frances L., daughter of Garry Brooks of Fairport, and they have one adopted daughter, Bessie Frances, new eleven years of age.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 113

Reynolds, Linus H., deceased, was born in Salem, Washington county, September 28, 1822. He was married in 1846 to Sarah Doane, of Granville, Washington county. Came to Monroe county, where he settled in Holley in 1848. In 1850 went to Virginia where he remained till 1861, then returned to Brockport where he was identified with the medical profession all his life, and was prominent in advancing the best interests of the town, being especially interested in the welfare of the Episcopal church, of which he was a member. Of a generous and benevolent character, his hand was ever extended toward the worthy and needy. He died October 10, 1891. in his seventieth year.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 114

Howell, Henry H., has been a resident of Fairport since the age of sixteen, with the exception of nine years from 1859 to 1868. During this time he pursued the adventurous career of a quartz miner of California. He was born at Newark, Wayne county, in 1837, of an old Jersey family but of German ancestry, and is the only surviving son of Jacob W. Howell who in 1853 came to Perinton and engaged in farming, and who reached the age of eighty-two years, his death occurring in 1882. After returning from California in 1868 Mr. Howell was for several years engaged in farming, and for a time conducted a market on West avenue. Mr. Howell was for two years police officer of the village, and several years deputy sheriff under Charles S. Cornell and for twenty years has been treasurer Fairport Lodge 476 F. & A. M , at present is a member of the Board of Education and also a member of the Board of Water Commissioners. December 20, 1872, he married Carrie M. White. They have one daughter, Mabel, born September 17, 1882; their only son died in infancy. Mr. Howell had two brothers and three sisters. One brother died at the age of thirteen years, and John, he is a well known and highly esteemed resident of the town of Perinton, who in early days went to California, and subsequently made four more trips to that country going and returning by water each of the five trips. He was well known throughout California being quite a noted quartz miner. He fell from an apple tree at his farm in 1891 injuring the base of his brain from which he never recovered consciousness. The three sisters are all living.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 114

Heinrich, William, was born in Montreal, Canada, February 28, 1861, a son of Wilhelm, who was a native of Germany, town of Aberfeldt, who came to the United States in 1850. In 1862 he came to Rochester and engaged in the confectionery business, being also a band leader of note. In 1876 he came to Brockport, where he engaged in the hotel business and in 1892 rebuilt the present house known as the Heinrich Hotel. He was the leader of the Brockport Band, and one of the founders and promoters of the German church. He married Frederica Rhinehart, by whom he had six children: William, Julius, George, Frederica, Eva and Elizabeth. He died in 1893, leaving his sons to take up the many business interests in which he was engaged, the management of the estate being taken by William.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 114

Johnson, Benjamin F., was born in the town of Sweden, March 25, 1813. His father, Ira, was a native of Oneida county and came to this town in 1811. He married Sallie Sturgis, and died in 1816. Benjamin F. was educated in the common schools, and in 1842 married Polly M. Owen, by whom he had two children: Lewis F. and Mrs. Celestia L. Haight. Our subject is a practical and successful farmer, and takes an active interest in all town affairs.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 114 - 115

Wheeler, Benjamin. - Guy Wheeler came from Sand Lake, N. Y., in 1825, and settled with his family in Parma near his present place, where he died. He was a thrifty and successful farmer. He had seven children, four of whom were born in Parma: Amarilla, who married Leonard Monroe; Benjamin, of Parma; Martha, who married Jefferson Barton; Rachel, who married Benjamin Cox; Job A., who died in Parma; Edward A. and Edwin F. (twins), both now living in Kansas. Guy Wheeler, who was born in 1798, died at the age of sixty-nine, and his wife died three years later. Benjamin Wheeler was born January 20, 1820, and has always followed farming and still lives on the old homestead, although he has large and varied interests in other localities, among them in Maryland, where he has spent several winters. When eighteen years of age he learned the art of grafting fruit trees, which business he followed six years, earning enough money to give him a good start in life, which with a small sum given him by his father, was the foundation of his successful business life. In 1857 he opened a store in North Parma, which he soon gave up and returned to the old farm. January 1, 1845, Mr. Wheeler married Melissa Crandall, by whom he has one child: Melissa, wife of Charles W. Garfield. His second wife was Dorothy Hiscock, to whom he was married January 14, 1847, by whom he had five children: Mary H., William H., Harriet L., Mina and Susan.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 115

Gallup, Andrew J., was born in Albany county March 31, 1825, a son of Eli Gallup, of Stonington, Conn., who came to this county in 1830 and settled in Sweden, where he engaged in farming. He married Sally Crary, and his death occurred in 1882, in his ninety-second year. A. J. Gallup was educated at Brockport Collegiate Institute, after which he taught school. In 1848 he married Mary A. Houston, whose father, Isaac, was a prominent lumber dealer in this county, and also supervisor, etc., of his town. Mr. and Mrs. Gallup have these children: Eli H., William N., Albert J., Mrs. Susan C. Garrison, Mrs. Fannie D. Webster, and Miss Sarah O. Gallup. Our subject is a practical and successful farmer of his town.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 115

Cole, Clair M., is a native of Mendon, born in 1851, and here he has always lived. His father was Nahum B., a son of Abraham, who came from Connecticut in an early day, and was a leading citizen of the town, having served as justice and supervisor many years. He reared a large family, all of whom settled in Mendon. Nahum B. married Mary, daughter of Captain Burt, and had one daughter, Mrs. Byron Howland, who died in 1889, and one son Clair. He took a good citizen's part in town affairs, having served as assessor. The elder Cole was prominently identified with the Presbyterian church, and the family have all been Democrats. Clair Cole married Emma Smith, who is of Canadian birth and they have two sons, Benjamin H. and Lewis M. Mr. Cole moved on his present farm in 1881, the place comprising 196 acres under high cultivation.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NYby William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 115

McBain, James W., was born in Ballston, Saratoga county, June 27, 1818, a son of Farquahar McBain of Scotland, who came to this country in 1801, settling at Ballston, where he married Janet Davidson. They removed to Monroe county in 1836, and bought the Crittenden farm, where his descendants now reside. He was a prosperous and public spirited citizen, identified in all good works, and especially in the cause of education. He died in 1850, aged seventy-two. In 1852 James W. married Jane, daughter of Gideon Holmes, and has followed in the footsteps of .his father, taking an active interest in all public affairs.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 116

Goodberlet, Joseph, was born in Hesse Castle, Germany, November 8, 1838, came to this country in 1853, and settled in Parma, and in 1869 settling in this town. In 1859 he married Emily, daughter of Alanson Van Brunt. Our subject has been a well-known contractor and builder as well as a successful farmer. In 1887 he was appointed postmaster, which office he still holds, and he is now serving as road commissioner, being a prominent factor in the local affairs of the town.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 116

Finucan, A. N., is proprietor of the famous old Phoenix Hotel at Pittsford, which has for seventy years been a prominent landmark, having been erected in 1826 by John Acker. In all this time the sturdy old hotel has not lost its supremacy as the leading hostelry of the place, and in the hands of Mr. Finucan bids fair to maintain its position as such, Under his management it has been improved and refitted, and extensive additions made to its culinary and dormitory capacity. Mr. Finucan was born at East Mendon in 1857, where his father, Daniel, settled in 1843. The latter was of Irish birth and came to America at the age of twenty-one. At New York city he married Margaret Fitzell, by whom he had nine children. She is still a resident of Mendon, having survived her husband. In 1884 Mr. Finucan married Margaret, daughter of Harvey C. Little, of Henrietta. Her family has always been a prominent one here, and in the earliest annals of Henrietta will be found the name of Elijah Little, coupled with every measure of improvement and progress.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NYby William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 116 - 117

Miller, William, came from Sand Lake, Rensselaer county, to Parma in 1836, and settled in the northern part of the town, where he was a prosperous and respected citizen. He died in 1876, survived by his widow. Eight of their children survive: Cornelius, Sarah Ann, John B., Martha Jane, J. Melvin, Mariette, Charles, and Alzina. John B. was born in Parma December 28, 1840, and has always followed agriculture. He attended the district school and later taught seven terms. He is a successful farmer, and is regarded as one of the substantial men of the town. In 1862 he married Lydia A. Van Voorhis, by whom he had three children: Albert, Alma, and Eva. His wife died September 5, 1890, and in 1891 Mr. Miller married Elizabeth Garlock, widow of Amos Emerson, of Charlotte. In the spring of 1890 Mr. Miller moved to North Parma village. He has two farms of 158 and eighty-four acres respectively. He has served as village trustee two years. Dr. Amos Emerson was a pioneer physician of Charlotte. He had a brother, John, and a sister, Eleanor, the latter an early teacher in Greece. Dr. Emerson had two children: Augusta, who married William Babcock, of Brighton, and Amos W., the latter a farmer of Greece and Parma. He married Elizabeth Garlock, by whom he had two children: Minnie L., wife of E. O. Smith, of Kendall, and Gertrude A., wife of J. Milton Butcher.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 117

Boothe, Reuben N., was born in Brighton August 10, 1867. His late father, also named Reuben N., was born in Scipio, Conn., and came to Brighton when two years of age with his father, Abijah Judson Boothe, who was born in England. Educated at Brockport Normal School, he stands to-day a representative of an old and well known family. In 1891 he married Myrtie J. Preston, of Pittsford.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 117

Warren, Newman, was born in Wheatland, March 7, 1826, a son of Benjamin Warren of Ulster county, who was a son of Newman Warren, a native of England, who came to America when a young man, settling in Ulster county. He removed to Rochester in 1802, and the following year came to Wheatland and settled on the farm now owned by our subject, where he spent his last days in the lyg house erected by him in the first clearing in 1815. His wife was Margaret Codding Benjamin. Father of our subject was a farmer, and spent most of his life on the home farm, but the last eight years were spent in Chili. He married Elizabeth Hicks, and their children were Elizabeth, Newman, Isaac, Mary, Benjamin and Janet. He died in 1880, aged eighty-six, and his wife in 1884, aged seventy-nine. Our subject remained at home until the age of twenty-six, when he engaged in farming for himself. In 1871 he bought the homestead, where he has since resided. In 1852 he married Catharine, daughter of Archibald and Isabella Stewart, of Wheatland, and their children are Stewart, Elizabeth, Isabella, Jane E. Benjamin, Archibald, and Catharine. Mrs. Warren died in 1870.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 117

Moore, Adam (deceased), was born in Clarkson, where he was for twenty-five years identified with the mercantile business. In 1844 he married Sabra C., daughter of Frederick Shafer, their children being Frederick A. and Clara E. Mr. Moore was for years prominent in the affairs of his town, holding various positions of honor and trust. He served as supervisor two terms, and was a man whose judgment was respected and sought by many. He died in 1888 in his seventy-first year, a loss not only to the family, but to all who knew him.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 117

Patten, J. E., was born in Sweden, February 12, 1848, a son of Daniel B., a native of Argyle, Washington county, who came to Sweden in 1840. He married Nancy, daughter of James Hart, and became a prosperous agriculturist. James E. Patten was educated at the Brockport Collegiate Institute, and in 1869 entered the employ of Tozier & Haight, druggists. In 1878 he associated with B. C. Ketcham, and in 1883 bought Ketcham's interest and now carries on the best store of its kind in the locality, keeping a complete line of imported and domestic drugs and perfumes, with a full assortment of stationery, etc. In 1881 he married Kate L., daughter of Sidney Spaulding, and their children are Kenneth S., Delia W., and Alice O.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 117 - 118

Cox, John, of Wheatland, was born in Yorktown, Westchester county, N. Y., August 31, 1819. His parents were Isaac and Hannah (Fowler) Cox. He first came to Monroe county in 1837 on a visit to friends already settled there. He married, October 5, 1842, Mary C., daughter of Oliver and Ann (Mosher) Cunningham, of North Castle, Westchester county, N. Y. Mary was horn, in North Castle, November 15, 1822. They removed to Chili in the spring of 1844, traveling on the Erie Canal and taking a week for the journey. They owned the farm in Chili, since the residence of Frederick Fellows, till 1854, when they traded it with him for the farm in Wheatland, where they have since resided. It has been their remarkable lot to live a wedded life of fifty-three years, and without the death of a child. John was a birthright member, and Mary a member by request, of the Religious Society of Friends, till the little meeting in the stone house on the hill was discontinued. Their children are; Stephen William, who was born February 5, 1844, in Yorktown, Westchester county, and resides in Wheatland; Isaac, who was born March 12, 1846, in Chili, lives in Rush; Henry E., born October 28, 1850, in Chili, where he now resides; William James, born April 2, 1855, in Wheatland, and resides in Clark county, Wash.; and John jr., born November 4, 1860, in Wheatland, and now resides in New York city.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 118

Page, W. L., born in Cedar Key, Florida, December 25, 1834, came to Monroe county in 1848, by way of underground railroad, and settled in the town of Perinton, being the first colored man educated in the University of Rochester, also the first colored man to serve on a jury in the Supreme Court of Monroe county. In 1863 he came to Brockport and engaged in mechanical engineering with Luther Gordon, D. S. Morgan & Co., and with J. C. Hoadley & Co., introduced the first threshing engines in this county. He is a man of great industry and force of character and has by his unaided efforts secured a liberal education, meriting and receiving the respect of all with whom he is associated.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 118

Perkins, Asa F., is a son of Asa, sr., now deceased, who was prior to 1827 a spinner in a woolen mill at Smithfield, Mass., where he married Martha Erten, who was also an operative in the mills. In 1827 they started on what was in those times a long journey, by wagon, to Troy, N. Y., where they took canal passage. They settled first in Penfield, and four years later removed to Perinton by ox team. Their happy married life covered a period of sixty-nine years, broken by the death of Mr. Perkins in 1892, at the age of ninety-two. Mrs. Perkins survives him, at the age of eighty-eight, a remarkable instance of mental and physical preservation. Asa F. was born in Penfield March 6,1831, and his home is just north of the village of Fairport. The children of Asa and Martha Perkins are Asa F., Samuel F., Jane E., Mary M., Olive C., Martha A., and Sarah Elizabeth.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 118 - 119

Udell, Parson G., was born in Rochester, December 16, 1849, a son of William C. and Mary M. Udell. Our subject was educated in the public schools and Collegiate Institutes of Statterlee & Peck. His preceptors were Drs. P. G. Shipman and J. F. Whitbeck of Rochester. He then entered the University of Pennsylvania, medical department, from which he graduated in 1871, having previously had a hospital experience and practice. After a year's practice at Rochester, Dr. Udell came to Spencerport, where he has been an active and successful practitioner in the town. For about two years he was partner with Dr. W. C. Slayton, but has otherwise practiced alone. He is a member of the County Medical Society, the Rochester Pathological Society (of which he was one of the founders), and during his residence in Rochester was assistant surgeon of the 54th Regt. N. G. S. N. Y. He married, first, Mary, daughter of William C. Slayton, and second, Jennie, daughter of Sylvester Warner of Ogden. Of their five children four survive.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 119

Pitt, William, was born in England, and was a son of William, sr., who came to America and settled in Brighton in 1854 as a farmer. They came to Webster in 1886, the family comprising the father, two sons, and William, jr., with his wife and children, who are William, Fannie, Lillian and Pansy. Mr. Pitt has been a farmer and fruit grower all his life.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
pages 174 - 175

PATRICK COX

Patrick CoxRochester has for years been one of the leading cities of the country in the manufacture of boots and shoes. No one can at present be called to mind to whom the credit for its fame can he attributed with more reason than to Patrick Cox. He was not only one of the early shoe manufacturers who made goods of the highest quality, but the extent of his manufactory and incidents in his business career had the effect of spreading the reputation of the Rochester shoe trade all over the continent and establishing the reputation of work done here as of the highest quality. As an illustration of the possibilities open to the right man in this country the experience of Mr. Cox might he cited. He was born in Longford, Ireland, January 1, 1842, and came to America in 1851, at the age of nine years. He had attended school in his native land, and on arriving in this city took advantage of the public schools to improve himself in studies that were interrupted when his parents emigrated. On leaving school he learned the shoe making business in this city and began in 1864 manufacturing on his own account in New York city, where he carried on business for seven years, at the end of which time he returned to Rochester and has ever since been intimately identified with the business in this city. His manufactory on Stone street is one of the best equipped in a city that does not take second place to any shoe manufacturing town in the United States. Mr. Cox is a Republican in politics, but has never held office. He was married to Miss Gertrude Gallery of Greece, New York, April 13, 1874, and has seven children. The family residence is at 293 East avenue.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 175

SAMUEL DIX

Samuel DixThe late Samuel Dix of this city was a distant descendant of Anthony Dix, who landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1623 from the ship "Ann," and was consequently of that early New England stock to which the country owes so much. Mr. Dix was the son of Amos Whitney Dix and was born in Reding, Vermont, September 7, 1804. His family is of the same ancestry as Governor Dix. His education was obtained in the common schools of the Green Mountain state, where he passed his youth. He moved from Vermont to Ogdensburg, where he lived twenty years, and in 1854 came to Rochester. He first engaged in the wall-paper business in this city and carried on that trade for several years. When he retired from active commerce he devoted his time to taking care of his real estate. Mr. Dix was a member of Washington street church, now the Central Presbyterian church. He was married three times. His last marriage, to Miss Sarah A. Parmenter, who survives him, took place at Brandon, Vermont, October 7, 1852. His surviving children are Mrs. Mary L. Williston, of Red Wing, Minnesota; Mrs. Sarah C. Mosher, Sioux City, Iowa; Mrs. Flora E. Proctor and Mrs. Fannie P. Brown, of this city; Frank A., of St. Paul, Minnesota; Alonzo C., of Dayton, Ohio, and Samuel, of Sodus, New York. Mr. Dix died at his residence in this city October 9, 1889, aged eighty-five years, and was interred at Mt. Hope cemetery. His widow retains her residence at 325 West avenue.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
pages 175 - 176

JAMES SABEY

James SabeyThe name of Sabey has been familiar to the people of Rochester for so long a period that men who are past middle life and have lived here all their years do not remember the time when there was no one of that family prominent in the city. The late James Sabey might almost have laid claim to the title of a pioneer in Rochester, for he came to this city in 1839. He was a native of Wendy, Cambridgeshire, England, where he was born in March, 1809, and passed the earlier years of his life. In 1837 Mr. Sabey came to the United States and for two years was a resident of St. Joseph, Michigan. When he came to Rochester he worked for a time at his trade, as a hatter. In 1853 he began business for himself at 105 East Main street, where he remained until 1873, when he removed to 97 on the same street and took his son George into business with him. Mr. Sabey was actively interested in church affairs, first as a member of Trinity church and afterward in Christ church congregation. He was also for twenty-five years an enthusiastic member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and treasurer for nineteen years of Genesee lodge. As a business man and citizen Mr. Sabey was highly esteemed. He was married in 1827 to Miss Sarah Edwards, who survives him. His children are Walter S., Mrs. Emily Copeland, Mrs. Lucy Winn and George A., who carries on the business established by his father.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 176

JOHN TAYLOR

John TaylorJohn Taylor comes of good old English stock and was born in London, England, August 18, 1815. In early manhood he learned the hat manufacturing business, in which his father was extensively engaged. In 1843 he married Miss Ellen Bradley, who was related to the Earl of Ross of astronomical fame, and they immediately sailed on their wedding trip for America, and visited this city, which they decided to make their future home. In 1846, soon after coming to Rochester, Mr. Taylor opened business on his own account in the Eagle Hotel building on Buffalo street, where he was so successful that when he retired from business, in 1876, his trade had grown to such proportions that it was merged into a general wholesale house for jobbing of hats, caps, furs and robes, and has ever since been continued by his sons, Thomas B. and John W. Taylor, under the name of John Taylor & Sons. It is now perhaps the oldest established hat business in the United States. Mr. Taylor was an enthusiastic member of Rochester's old volunteer fire department until 1866, when he became exempt from further service. He was a member of the Independent Hook and Ladder company, and long after he was entitled to retire from active service took part in the parades. Mr. Taylor's wife expired August 17, 1890.

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