Biographies of Monroe County People
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From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 160

Murphy, Judge John Martin, was born in Lima, N. Y., March 24, 1859, and received his education at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary. from which he was graduated in June, 1870. The same year be began the study of law in the office of D. C. Feely, of Rochester, and was admitted to the bar in October, 1883, when he at once commenced the general practice of his profession. Mr. Murphy has built up a good reputation as a lawyer. In 1895 he was appointed judge of the Municipal Court, at a meeting of the Common Council, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the late Judge Craig.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 160

Taylor, Zachary P., was born in Oneida county, N. Y., February 8, 1846, removed with his parents to Clarendon, Orleans county, and was educated in the Brockport Collegiate Institute, now the State Normal School, from which institution he was graduated in 1864. After teaching school one year he entered the University of Rochester and was graduated in 1869. He was then for two and one-half years instructor of classics in the Buffalo Central High School, and later held the same position in the Central High School of Cleveland, Ohio. In the meantime he read law in the offices of Wadsworth & White, of Buffalo, and Judge Jesse P. Bishop, of Cleveland, and was graduated from the Cleveland Law School in 1872, being valedictorian of his class, which comprised twenty-six members. He was principal of the West and Central High Schools of Cleveland until 1883, when he came to Rochester as principal of the Free Academy, which position he acceptably filled until the fall of 1886, when he resumed the practice of his profession in Rochester. He is now senior member of the law firm of Taylor & Marsh. Mr. Taylor has been actively identified with the Prohibition party, working and speaking fur its cause, and was its candidate for State senator, in 1887, when he received a very flattering vote. He was lay delegate to the General Conference of the M. E. Church held in New York city in May, 1888. and was a member of the committee of five which prepared a resolution to be submitted to the subordinate conferences as to whether women should be admitted as lay representatives to the general body. December 29, 1875, he married Miss Mary E., daughter of the late Hiram Davis, of Rochester, and they have had four children: Mortimer D. (who died August 2, 1892, aged fifteen), and Herbert R., Helen, and Marion, aged respectively fourteen, eight, and six years.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 160 - 161

Heughes, Frederick Lee, was born in Rochester in 1850, and is a son of William Heughes, one of the first publishers of books in this city, who settled here in 1848. Mr. Heughes served an apprenticeship in his father s printing office and received his education at the public schools, graduating from the old High School in 1866. After leaving school he returned to the printing business, and being of a mechanical turn, he invented and patented a press for printing in colors, a working model of which is now in the patent office. In 1871, after a severe illness, he entered the employ of W. H. Cheney as bookkeeper and later became general manager, and it was here that Mr. Heughes saw the general use that could be made of rolled beams, as girders, joists, etc. In 1878 he became an iron contractor, and since the fall of 1879 has been very successful, having finished and erected the Wilder building, the Granite and Sibley, Lindsay & Curr buildings, the Powers Hotel. the German Insurance building, the new Chamber of Commerce, the new Court House, and hundreds of other fire-proof structures throughout Central and Western New York. He has been eminently successful and has accumulated a fortune. Commencing active life with no capital but perseverance, energy and shrewd foresight, he has attained through his own efforts the highest position among the leading manufacturers of the country. Prompt, upright and candid in business transactions, he has never given or received promissory note, his word being always considered as good as his bond. Few men have ever enjoyed the wide and enviable reputation which Mr. Heughes has acquired, anol fewer still have ever ranked higher in their chosen calling. He is largely interested in Rochester real estate and has built up, literally speaking, more of the city than any other man. In politics be has always been a Republican and is an advocate of sound money on a gold basis. His home life is especially happy, antl his leisure is spent amidst the social environments of his family. In 1883 he was married to Miss Effie M. Kinne, of Lockport, N. Y., and they have had three sons: Herbert F., Walter Lee, and Benjamin A.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 161

Shantz, Moses B., was born in Berlin, Canada, August 24, 1852, where he received his early education, later attending to business college for a few months, after which he entered the employ of his father as a bookkeeper and business manager, in which capacity he remained for a number of years, making a study of the business in which he is now engaged, the manufacturing of buttons. in 1887 Mr. Shantz came to Rochester and in a small way began the manufacture of buttons, which has since increased until at the present time it is one of the largest plants of its kind in the United States. In 1891 the stock company of M. B. Shantz & Co. was organized and incorporated with a capital of $150,000 and with Mr. Shantz, president; H. E. Wheeler, vice-president; H. K. Elston, secretary anti treasurer, all of whom still hold their respective offices. The company has branch salesrooms in New York, Philadelphia and Chicago.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 161 - 162

Bly, Myron T., son of John E. Bly, was born in Henrietta, Monroe county, New York. He prepared for college at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, and entering the University of Rochester in 1876 was graduated in June, 1880. He paid the expenses of his education by his own labor. During the first part of his college course he filled a reporter s position on the Rochester Morning Herald. Later, he became editor of the Sunday Morning Herald, which post he continued to hold until his graduation. Immediately after graduation he began the study of Iaw, and was admitted to the Monroe county bar in 1882. He began to practice in Rochester immediately afterward, and has built up a large and lucrative business. Mr. Bly s journalistic work, originally entered upon for the purpose of paying college expenses, has produced other results. During his senior year in college, besides attending to his college work and editing a weekly paper, he contested for and won the highest literary prize of the university. While studying law he prepared to series of articles on "Milling Law and Legislation," which were published in The American Miller during thou year 1881. In the same year he wrote for the American Tanner a serial story entitled "My Tannerville Client." During the four years from 1885 to 1889 he wrote montbly articles for The Boston Path-finder, under the title: "Legal Hints for Travelers." He has written two text-books for use in academies. The first, "A Treatise on Business Law," was published in 1891. In 1893 came "Descriptive Economics" The latter has attracted wide attention among educators. Mr. Bly is one of the esteemed business men of Rochester and is known as a careful, conscientious attorney.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 162

Davis, William C., was born in New York city and finished his education at the Wilson Collegiate Institute in Niagara county. At the age of fifteen he began his active life as a clerk in the old dry goods house of S. B. Chittenden & Co. in New York city, where he remained until the breaking out of the war in 1861, when he enlisted in the 1st R. I. Inf., Col. (afterward general) A. B. Burnside, and served three years, being promoted to the rank of major. Returning to New York he engaged in the dry goods business until 1880, when he removed to Rochester, where he has been assoociated with the firm of Burke, Fitz Simons, Hone & Co. until 1889. He then engaged in his present business as a general dealer in real estate. He is a member of the Rochester Real Estate Exchange, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Masonic fraternity, being a Knight Templar.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 162

Menzie, Herbert J., was born at Riga, N. Y., June 19, 1862. He attended the public schools of his native town and later became a student at the Brockport Normal School, from which he was graduated in 1881. He then entered the University of Rochester and was graduated from that institution in 1886, receiving the degree of B. A., winning the senior mathematical prize (Stoddard medal), being one of the commencement speakers, and being elected a member of Phi Beta Kappa fraternity. From 1886 to 1888 he was principal of the 17th district school of Milwaukee, Wis., and while there received a State life certificate for teaching. He then entered the law department of Yale College and remained one year, when he came to Rochester and began the study of his chosen profession in the office of McNaughton & Taylor. He was admitted to the bar in 1890, and since then he has practiced law in this city, where be has been successful. He is a member of the Rochester Lodge, No. 660, F. & A. M., the Alpha Delta Phi, and of the Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 162

Chamberlain, Philetus, was born in Rose, Wayne county, N. Y., April 14, 1854, and received his education at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, of Lima, N. Y., and Syracuse University. Choosing law as his profession he began his studies in the office of Martindale & Oliver, of Rochester, and was admitted to the bar at the General Term in October, 1879. He began practice in this city, and has been more than successful. He is a leading factor in and a hard worker for the Republican party, and is actively identified with a number of charitable societies and various other oorganizations of the city, where he is well and popularly known.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 162 - 163

Keenan, Edward Arthur, was born at East Bloomfield, Ontario county, N. Y., August 1. 1861. Receiving his rudimentary education in his native town he became a student at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, from which institution be was graduated with honor in June, 1871. He engaged in teaching in the public schools, and in the spring of 1889 entered the office of William W. Mumford, of Rochester, N. Y., as a student at law. He was admitted to the bar at the General Term on the fall of 1892, and immediately afterwards formed co-partnership with his brother-in-law, Judge John M. Murphy, for the practice of general law, which still continues.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 163

Hamilton, John B., was born at Avon, Livingston county, N. Y., January 10, 1843, and is of Scotch parentage. He received his early education in his native town and subsequently attended the schools of Poughkeepsie and New York city. He spent some time in the West and in 1872 removed to West Rush, Monroe county, where he engaged in the produce business. Mr. Hamilton has always been actively identified with the Republican party and was a delegate to the National Convention at Chicago in 1888. He was a member of the Advisory Council on cereal industry at the World s fair in 1893, and in the fall of the same year was elected county treasurer by a large majority, and still efficiently fills that responsible position. He is a member of Henrietta Lodge, F. & A. M., and of the Rochester Whist club. In 1868 he married Mary C. McMillan, of York, Livingston county.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 163

Houck, George H., was born in Rush, Monroe county, N. Y., October 30, 1844. He was educated in his native town, and later entered the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, from which institution he was graduated in 1862. He was then called home to manage the farm on account of the death of his father, which occurred in December, 1862. In 1873 he was elected supervisor and re-elected for three consecutive years. In March, 1895, he was appointed by President Cleveland as collector of customs of the port of Genesee. Mr. Houck still resides in Rush in the house in which he was born.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 163

Buell, Jesse W., M.D., was born in Geneseo, N.Y., and was reared from childhood on Rochester. He was a member of the class of '74 of the University of Rochester, and took his degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts from that institution. After graduation he entered the New York Homoeopathic Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1887. Since that time he has been in active practice in Rochester, and has been, from its organization, one of the staff of the Homoeopathic Hospital, having done service in both the medical and surgical sides of the house. He is a member of the New York State, Western New York, and Monroe County Medical Societies and was in 1885 president of the last named organization.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 163

Barhite, John A., was born in Auburn, N.Y., January 11, 1857, and when quite young moved with his parents to Hopewell, N.Y. He attended the Canandaigua Academy and was graduated in June, 1876. Remaining at home until the fall of 1877, he then entered the University of Rochester, from which institution he was graduated in 1881. He then read law in the office of Theodore Bacon, of Rochester, and was admitted to the bar at the Buffalo general term in 1883. Mr. Barhite is an active worker for the Republican party and was a delegate to the National Convention in Minneapolis in 1892. He has held a number of prominent offices and many positions of trust, which, by his extensive knowledge of public affairs, he has honorably and efficiently filled. He was a delegate from the old Twenty-eighth Senatorial District, comprising the county of Monroe, to the Constitutional Convention in 1894, and is a member of Frank R. Lawrence Lodge, F. and A. M., Hamilton Chapter, and Monroe Commandery, Kislingbury Lodge No. 257, K. of P., the Rochester Whist Club, etc.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 164

Hofheinz, Dr. R. H., was born in Heidelberg, Germany, and received his education at the Gymnasium of his native city. In 1870 he came to America. He studied dentistry in Rochester and entered the New York Dental College, from which institution he was graduated in 1878, after which he located in Rochester and began the practice of his profession. In 1883 be took a trip to Europe and remained two years, after which he returned to Rochester and resumed his practice. In 1893 he went to Berlin, where he remained eighteen months. January 4, 1884, he married Catherine, daughter of Henry Bartholomay. He is a member of the Monroe Club, the Rochester Dental Society, the Seventh District Dental Society, and the New York State Dental Society.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 164

Lamb, George W., was born in New London, Conn., in August, 1840. His early schooling was received at Penfield, Monroe county, after which, on account of an accident he was obliged to finish his education at home under the instruction of his sister. He became a law student in the office of John W. Willson, at Penfield, and was admitted to the bar in 1867. He is well known throughout this section of the State on account of his extensive practice as pension attorney. He practiced in Penfield and Fairport, N. Y, each two years, and since 1871 in Rochester. He is a Mason, and is prominently identified with various other organizations.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 164

Weeks, William H., was born in Penfield in 1812, son of John and grandson of Benjamin Weeks, who came from Danbury, Conn. to Penfield in 1797 and in 1800 ran a hotel, it being the first public house in Penfield. Benjamin Weeks built to tannery in what is now Pittsford, which he ran for several years and then sold to Stephen Lusk. In 1812 he bought the farm where William Heffer now lives, where he reared a large family and died in 1840, aged sixty-nine. His sons were John R., George W., Benjamin B and David, all of whom settled in or near Penfield. John P. settled on the farm where William H. was born and lives, where he died in 1873 leaving two sons, George M. and William H. In 1857 William H. married Augusta M., daughter of Joseph N. Perry, of Lewis county, N.Y., by whom be has two sons Frank D. and D. M. Ferry Weeks, and one daughter, Lucy A. Mr. Weeks is extensively engaged in the culture of choice fruits and is one of the best informed men of the town. The family trace their ancestry back to their coming from England in 1635.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 164

Gray, David S., was born on the farm where he now lives. His father, Clark Gray, settled on the farm in 1824 and died in 1865, leaving two suns, David S. and Clark, and three daughters. Mr. Gray married Alice Miller, of Ontario county. He has always been engageol in farming. His mother was Samantha, daughter of Rev. Selden Graves, who is mentioned as among the prominent settlers of Penfield.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 164

Coggswell, William F., was born in the town of Perinton, Monroe county, September 26, 1824, was admitted to the bar in May, 1846, and has practiced his profession in Rochester ever since. William N. Cogswell, son of William F., was born in this city July 9, 1858, was graduated from the University of Rochester in 1878, and studied law with his father. He was admitted to the bar in 1881, since which time he has practiced in partnership with his father, the firm being Cogswell & Cogswell.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 164-5

Tubbs, Joseph Nelson, was born in Esperance, Schoharie county, N.Y., September 24, 1882. His parentage on his father s side was English, and Scotch on his mother s side. His early education was obtained in the public schools of Esperance and Albany, and he was graduated from the State Normal School at Albany in October, 1850. He pursued mathematical studies with Prof. George R. Perkins, the author of a series of mathematical text books. He studied law with Hon. John E. Mann, afterward justice of the Supreme Court of Wisconsin, and with Judges Frazer and Stewart, of Johnstown, N.Y. In consequence of ill health he abandoned the profession of the law when nearly ready to be admitted to the bar, having in the meantime taught school for short periods in some large towns in this State. In 1854 he accepted a position in an engineer corps engaged on the enlargement of the canals in this State. Mr. Tubbs came to Rochester in 1861. He remained in the service of the State in responsible positions until 1872, during which year he was engaged as chief engineer of the proposed water works for Rochester and was also chief engineer and superintendent of the construction of the Elmira Reformatory. From thence onward he designed and supervised the construction of the Rochester water works, and remained in charge until June, 1890. From that time until February, 1895, he was engaged in business as a consulting engineer. Among the important works for which he was employed as an expert engineer during this period were the designs for the Syracuse water works, and the condemnation proceedings to acquire the property of the old water works company and the water power rights on the outlet of Skaneateles Lake; condemnation proceedings connected with the construction of the new water supply conduit for Rochester; the legal contest between the D., L. & W. Railroad Company and the town of York, Livingston county; the town of Geneseo vs. the Board of Supervisors; the case of White vs. the D., L. & W. Railroad Company; the water power owners on the Oatka against the Salt Works in the Wyoming Valley; the water works contractor against the village of East Syracuse and the contractor against the village of Ilion. At various times Mr. Tubbs has designed works or acted as consulting engineer or expert of water works at Rochester, Syracuse, Geneva, Geneseo, Medina, Dryden, Albion, Mt. Morris, Lyons, Oneida, Port Jervis, Penn Yan, and East Syracuse in this State, and in many cities and towns in other States. Since February, 1895, he has been in the employ of the superintendent of public works as general inspector of all the New York State canals. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Water Works Association, the New England Water Works Association, of the various Masonic bodies, and of the Rochester Whist Club. His first vote was cast for the nominee of the old Whig party, and since the organization of the Republican party has been affiliated with it. He never held an elective office. Mr. Tubbs was married in 1856 to Elithea Mandell Wooster, who survives, and has two sons and one daughter: William N., Frank W., and Josie Elithea. His residence is now No. 18 Rutger street, Rochester, N.Y.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 165-6

Putnam, Earl B., son of the late George Putnam, was born in Waterville, N. Y., where he resided until 1881, when he moved to Rochester. He was a graduate of Harvard College in 1879, and in 1880-81 studied law at the Columbia College Law School, after which he read law with Hon. Martin W. Cooke, of Rochester, and was admitted to the bar in 1882 from the office of Cooke & Pond, where he remained as managing clerk until 1883. Until 1888 he practiced alone, at which time he formed a partnership with George F. Slocum, which has cobtinued up to the present time. During Mr. Putnam s residence in Rochester he was director and secretary of the Silver Lake Ice Company, director of the Silver Lake R. R., and of the Union Bank of Rochester, trustee of the Society for the Organization of Charity, vestryman of St. Paul s Protestant Episcopal church, member of the New York State Bar Association, Genesee Valley Club, Whist Club and Kent Club. October 17, 1882, he married Grace Williams Tower, daughter of the late Charlemagne Tower, of Philadelphia.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 166

Highee, Abijah Peck, Penfield, Monroe county, N. Y., was born in Duanesburg, Schenectady county, N. Y., March 29, 1818. His father, William Highee, moved to Penfield in 1885, and purchased the farm now owned and occupied by the subject of this sketch, so that Mr. Higbee has lived in the same house for sixty years. In 1841 he married Sarah lane Ross, of Penfield, N. Y.. by whom he had two sons and two daughters, viz: William deceased; Horace, of Wellsville, N. Y.; Mrs. R. W. Warner, of Penfield, N, Y; and Mrs. J. F. Forbes, of De Land, Fla. Mr. Highee was educated in the Academy at Penfield, and in 1848 he united with the Baptist church at that place, and he has been for years one of the most influential and liberal members of the church. Mr. Higbee has held no office in his town except that of assessor, but he has always been a prominent and successful farmer, and his judgment has been uniformly respected by his neighbors and fellow citizens in financial and business matters.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 166

Vick, Henry H., was born on the homestead, November 13, 1857, and his education was obtained in the public schools, Satterly Institute, and was graduated from Rochester Business University. He is a florist, seed grower, and market gardener by occupation. May 8, 1879, he married Carrie English, of the town of Greece, and they had six children: Lizzie I., Fern M., a baby boy who died in infancy, Blanche L., Henry H., jr., and Carry L. Mr. Vick s father, Joseph H., was born in Portsmouth, England, November 14, 1830, and came to New York city with his parents in 1833. In 1834 the family came to Rochester, where he was educated in the public schools. His father established one of the first and best boot and shoe shops in Rochester. At the age of eighteen Joseph H. had mastered the art of boot and shoe cutting, and was foreman in his father s shop. In 1856 he married Eliza A. Hawley, of Janesville, Wis., formerly of Gravesend, England, and six children were born to them: Henry H., as above, Arthur T., Clara L., Maude M., Frank J., and Albert R. Henry H. Vick s grandfather, James Vick, purchased the homestead in 1850. He erected a shop and with his sons, George and Joseph, followed the occupation of farming and shoemaking. James Vick, an uncle to Henry H., became the famous seedsman. He began in a small way in 1857. In 1865 Joseph H. and family again went to Rochester, where they cultivated seeds, and in 1868 returned to Greece for permanent business, as foreman for his brother James, which he followed until his death, June 8, 1892. Mrs. Vick s father, Nathan English, was horn in Carlton, Orleans county, N. Y., November 11, 1820, was educated in the common schools, and a farmer by occupation. November 16, 1842, be married Mary J. Hobbs, of Rush, Monroe county, N. Y., and they had eight children: H. Eugene, Wells D., Louisa D., Nathan W., George C., Carrie, as above, Jennie and Newton. The family came to the town of Greece in 1847. Mrs. English died January 28, 1890, and Mr. English December 17, 1890. Mr. Vick is a member of Valley Lodge No. 109, F. & A. M., Rochester, N. Y., and of Lake Ontario Grange No. 311, Greece, N. Y.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 167

Michel, Albert, born in Germany in 1837, emigrated in 1857, coming directly to Rochester. Mr. Michel s father was a farmer of limited means, and Albert may be rightly termed the architect of his own success, as his available capital when he reached Rochester was but two dollars. His independent position has been reached by methods which have not forfeited the esteem and respect of his neighbors, and is wholly due to his own frugality and integrity. He has been a resident of Brighton since 1865, now occupying a handsome home in the central part of the town, and engaged in general farming. In 1861 he married Petronella Schumann, also of German birth, who has born him eleven children, of whom four, William Victor, Clara, Joseph and Carrie are deceased. Seven children are living: Frances, John, Matthew, Lillian, Frank, George and Albert.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 167

Raymond, Charles C., was born in 1846, a son of Isaac and Mary (Rich) Raymond, the father being born in 1805. He came to Penfield from Connecticut in 1832 and served at different times as supervisor, legislator, and deputy sheriff. His death occurred in 1849, leaving three sons: George W., Wm. I. T., and Charles C. His grandfather, Samuel Rich, came to Penfield in 1799 and lived on the place where Mr. Raymond now lives. The latter was for some years engaged in raising nursery stock with his brother, George, since which he has devoted his attention to farming. He has served as collector, assessor, and in 1894 was elected supervisor. His wife was Francelia E., daughter of Myron R. Smith, and they have one son, Clinton B., and one daughter, Grace.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 167

Terrill, Erwin, is the second son of the late Thaddeus Terrill of Ogden, who settled here in 1860, removing from Middletown, Vermont, where his children were born, and where his wife had died three years before. She was Lydia Loomis, of an old and prominent Vermont family, and her father was a soldier in the Revolution. Erwin Terrill was born in 1840 at Middletown, and was twenty years old when the family settled at Ogden. He completed his education at Spencerport. He first engaged in farming in the town of Irondequoit, where he remained eight years, in 1860 coming to Brighton, and becoming the possessor of a valuable suburban farm, devoted chiefly to dairy products. In 1870 Mr. Terrill married L. Isabelle, daughter of George W. Winship, of Parma, and their two sons, Whitcomb, who is associated with his father in the dairy business, and Edwin Osgood, attending Rochester University. Mr. Terrill is a Republican, and he takes a leading part in town affairs, having been assessor since 1889, and in March, 1895, was elected village trustee without opposition.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 167 - 168

Northrop, Burr S., was born in Penfield, July 16, 1850, the son of Abel G. and Cornelia A. (Scoville) Northrop. Abel G. Northrop was born in January, 1823, and lived on the farm where Burr now lives, and died there in 1879. Burr Northrop was married January 31, 1878, to Ruth, daughter of Samuel Raymond, and they have five children, Raymond, Abel, Laura, Burr, and George. Mr. Northrop is at present, and has been for ten years, overseer of the poor, and has also been school trustee. His grandfather, Burr Northrop, settled here about 1828, and bought the farm where the present Burr Northrop lives.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 168

Plumb, William T., was born in Lewis county, N.Y., September 14, 1867 where he received his rudimentary education. He removed with his parents to Rochester and entered the Free Academy, and upon graduation received a scholarship to the University of Rochester, from which he was graduated with honor in 1887, taking the Townsend scholarship. Choosing law as his profession Mr. Plumb began his studies in the office of Shuart & Sutherland, and was admitted to the bar at the general term at Rochester in October, 1893. He has successfully built up a large and lucrative practice. In January, 1895, Mr. Plumb was appointed by Mayor Lewis secretary of the Civil Service Board. He is a member of the Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa fraternities and the Rochester Athletic Club.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 168

Carnahan, Hon. George Alexander, was born in Ravenna, Ohio, May 21,1862. He received his early education in his native town, and was graduated from the Wesleyan University of Middletown, Conn., in the class of 1884, after which he entered the office of Morgan & French, of Rochester, for the study of law. He was admitted to the bar in this city in 1886, and immediately afterward opened an office here In 1894 he was elected judge of the Municipal Court of the city of Rochester, and served on that bench until January, 1895, when he resigned to accept the appointment by Governor Morton of special county judge of Monroe county, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Judge Arthur E. Sutherland. Judge Carnahan is also a member of the Board of Managers of the State Industrial School of Rochester.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 168

Beahan, James, M. D., was horn in Newark, N. J., July 15, 1822, and came to this State with his mother. He was educated in Starkey Seminary and Hobart College and came to reside in the town of Gates, this county, in 1847. He graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., in 1852, and at once began practice in Gates, where he had a fine business many years. In 1875 he removed to Rochester, but still retains a large portion of his old patrons from Gates. January 27, 1857, he married Abby Scofield, of the town of Chili, by whom he had two sons, Herman S. and Charles C. The former is a graduate of Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York city, who has a large and growing practice in Rochester and suburbs, and Charles C. is a coal merchant. Dr. James Beahan is a member of the Monroe County Medical Society, and of Teoronto Lodge of Odd Fellows.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 168

Heenan, Martin M., son of Martin, was born in Ireland on the 27th of October, 1856, and came to America in May, 1875, after receiving his education and serving an apprenticeship in his native country. For the first three years after his arrival he was a clerk in a dry goods store in Oswego, following which he spent a like period in Auburn, N.Y. During the next six years he was a clerk in the cloak and suit establishment of Garry Brothers in New York city, and for a similar term he was in the employ of D. McCarthy & Co., of Syracuse. In 1893 he removed to Rochester and purchased an interest in the New York cloak and suit house at No. - State street, and in May, 1895, he bought out the business of Francis Fitzgibbon, and became sole proprietor. His business is confined exclusively to ladies cloaks and suits, and in this connection it is one of the leading concerns of the kind in the city. Mr. Heenan has been a member of the A. O. H. for about ten years.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 169

White, Richard E., was born in Mansfield, Mass., June 12, 1848, and in 1855 removed with his parents to the town of Wheatland, Monroe county. He received his education in the district schools of that town, at Valley Seminary in Fulton, Oswego county, and at the Brockport Normal School. He read law in the office of Joseph A. Stull, of Rochester, and was admitted to the bar at the general term of the Supreme Court in Buffalo in June, 1875. He immediately began the practice of his profession in Rochester, where he has since been eminently successful. While George A. Benton was district attorney of Monroe county Mr. White was associated with him in partnership. He has been an elder of St. Peter s Presbyterian church for the past fifteen years and clerk of the session for six years.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 169

Beach, Daniel Beers, was born in Temple street in New Haven, Conn., November 14, 1822, and received his preliminary education in his native city. Reared under the influences of that historic seat of learning, he became a private tutor in families in Brunswick county, Va., in Rockingham county, N. C. He was graduated from Yale College in the class of 1842 and from the law department of that institution in 1845, being admitted to the bar of that State in August following. The same year he removed to Rochester, N. Y., and was admitted to the New York State bar at Albany, in January, 1847. He began the practice of his profession at Rochester immediately afterwards. In 1867 he temporarily returned to his old home in New Haven and practiced law there until the spring of 1871, when he again came to Rochester, where he has ever since resided and followed his chosen profession. He served as supervisor of the then Seventh ward of Rochester in 1865, being elected on the Republican ticket. Except this, he has given his attention almost exclusively to his business. June 1, 1858, Mr. Beach married Miss Loraine Rogers, of Lockport, and has had two sons and four daughters, of whom three daughters are living.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 169 - 170

Chadsey, John H., was born in the village of Ballston Spa, Saratoga county, N.Y., March 1, 1845, the eldest son of Dr. Alonzo J. Chadsey, a well known and eminent physician of said county. He was educated in private and public schools, and at eleven years of age removed to Schenectady, where he attended the preparatory school in the old Union College building, and graduated from the classical department at the age of sixteen years; attending the County Institute, he received a certificate to teach any common school in Schenectady county, The war of the Rebellion breaking out, he enlisted in Co. A, 132d Regiment, N. Y. S. Vols., but was not mustered in the service on account of being under the required age. After leaving school he was a clerk in his uncle s store for two years, and then removed to New York city and entered the office of the famous lawyer, John Graham, esq., as a student at law, and at the age of twenty-one years was admitted to the bar, Hon. Eldridge T. Gerry being one of the examiners. He remained with Mr. Graham nearly five years thereafter, and was, in May, 1870, employed as an assistant to Messrs. John Graham and Eldridge T. Gerry, the counsel for the prisoner in the celebrated trial of Daniel McFarland, for the killing of Albert D. Richardson, in the Tribune office, in the city of New York. He took a course in political economy and debate at the Cooper Institute, and was vice-president of the Cary Political Science Society. In February, 1871, he removed to St. Mary s, Kansas, and became a partner in the firm of Sedgwick & Chadsey. in the land, law, and insurance business, and had exclusive charge of the law department; returning east in December of the same year he was married to Miss Emma J. Covey, youngest daughter of Alvah Covey, of Penfield, Monroe county. In 1873 he returned to Penfield and opened a law office at Fairport, which he afterwards removed to Rochester, retaining his residence at Penfield until 1891, when he removed to the city of Rochester. He has been constantly engaged in the practice of law, is well known, and has an extensive practice in Monroe county and vicinity; he has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for years, and is past master of Penfield Union Lodge, F. & A. M. In politics he is a Republican, casting his first presidential vote for U. S. Grant in 1868; he was a member of the Republican County Committee of Monroe county for four years, two of which he was treasurer of said committee.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 170

Hopkins, John Hampden, was born in Rochester, June 20, 1852, and in 1872 was graduated from Hamilton College. He read law in the office of Cox & Avery, of Auburn, N. Y., and later entered the Albany Law School, from which he was graduated in 1875. Returning to Auburn he practiced law until 1877, when he came to Rochester, where he has since followed his chosen profession.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 170

Hays, David, was horn in Rochester, N. Y., November 28, 1858. At an early age he attended the grammar schools in New York city, and in 1874 the Free Academy of Rochester, and graduated from the Rochester University in 1878, after which he took a course in political science at the University of Berlin, and was a graduate of the Columbian Law School in the class of 1881, at which time he was admitted to the bar. In January, 1883, he became a partner of Mr. James B. Perkins, which partnership continued until the removal of Mr. Perkins to France in August, 1890, and was renewed in August, 1895, on the return of Mr. Perkins to Rochester.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 170

Maurer, Edward W., was born in Rochester, N. Y., April 17, 1858, was graduated from the University of Rochester in 1877, and in the fall of the same year entered the University of Goettingen, Germany, where he remained for over two years. In 1880 he returned to America and entered the law office of ex-Congressman (now justice of the Supreme Court) John M. Davy, and was admitted to the bar in the spring of 1882. He then formed a partnership with Mr. Davy, which continued until 1886, when he opened an office alone for the practice of the law. In 1887 he was elected member of assembly on the Republican ticket. He is a member of the Central Presbyterian church. His father was one of the oldest grocery merchants in this city, and died in 1892, his place of business being at 149 East Main street. His mother is still living in the old homestead, 67 North Clinton street, in Rochester. Mr. Maurer s offices are at Nos. 416, 417, and 418 Elwanger & Barry building.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 170 - 171

La Salle, B. F. & C. W. - Dr. B. Frank La Salle, son of Francis La Salle, was born in Paris, France, March 29, 1842, and came to this country in infancy with his parents, who located in St. Lawrence county, where Dr. La Salle received his preliminary education. Afterwards he entered the office of Dr. J. D. Huntington, of Watertown, N. Y., for the study of dentistry, where, after three years of diligent work, he passed the State examination and began the practice of his profession in Oswego, N. Y. In 1876 he removed to Rochester, where he has built up a very large practice. His son, Dr. Clint W. La Salle, who is a graduate of the Buffalo Dental College, and who was the first student to matriculate in that institution, is associated with him under the above firm name. Dr. B. P. La Salle is a member of the Seventh District Dental Society and was the organizer of the Rochester Dental Club, now the Rochester Dental Society, of which he was president for one year. He is a member of Valley Lodge, No. 109, F. & A. M., and served it as master in 1881-82; he also belongs to Hamilton Chapter R. A. M., Doric Council, and Monroe Commandery, No. 12, K. T.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 171

Thayer, George W., was born in Livonia, N. Y., December 9, 1846, and is a son of George and Phebe Thayer. He received his rudimentary education in his native town, and later took a three years special course at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary. He soon after became proprietor of the Bank of Lima, and conducted the same for about twenty years. He moved to Rochester in 1888 and was in active business until 1893, when the Alliance Bank was organized, of which he became president, which position he has since held.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 171

Finnessy, James H., M. D., son of Patrick T. Finnessy, was born in Allegany county, N. Y., October 8, 1864. He finished his education at the Geneseo State Normal School, after which he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, Md., and was graduated with the degree of M. D. from the University of Baltimore in 1890. After completeing his collegiate course he came to Rochester and accepted the appointment of house physician to St. Mary s Hospital, which position he filled for one year, when he opened an office for the practice of medicine. Dr. Finnessy is medical examiner for a number of prominent insurance companies, is a member of the Monroe County Medical Society, and is one of the rising young physicians in Rochester.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 171

Paviour, Robert S., son of William and Sarah Paviour, was born in Rochester, N. Y., September 17, 1859. He attended the public schools of his native city and later entered the Rochester Free Academy, from which he was graduated in 1876. The same year he became a clerk in the fire insurance office of Ward & Clark (established in 1870), in which capacity he remained until the death of Mr. Ward in 1880, when he was made general manager, Mr. Clark being a resident of Boston, Mass. In 1881 Mr. Paviour was admitted to partnership under the firm name of Clark & Paviour and in January, 1891, he became sole proprietor of the business, which be has since conducted. He has been very successful, and is well and favorably known. He represents the Phoenix Assurance Company of London, the Phoenix Insurance Company of Hartford, the Westchester Fire Insurance Company of New York, and the Equitable Fire and Marine Insurance Company of Providence, all leading fire insurance companies, and the New Jersey Plate Glass Insurance Company of Newark, N. J. He was formerly president of the Rochester Board of Fire Underwriters, is actively interested in various institutions of the city, and takes a prominent part in promoting and fostering their welfare, being officially connected with several organizations of note.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 171 - 172

Brown, Richard, was horn in the town of Mayfield, Sussex, England, August 11, 1828, and came to this country with his parents when an infant. They first located in Canada, and later in Pittsford, Monroe county, where he received a part of his education. The family again returned to Canada, remaining until 1845, when they came to Port Byron, Cayuga county. August 17 of that year he began to learn the tinner s trade and did extensive work on Auburn Prison. He returned to Port Byron in 1852. In that year he married Caroline Springer of that place, and went to Addison, Mich., later to Hillsdale, Mich., and from there to Logansport, Ind., where he did business for a year on his own account. From there he went to Monticello, the same State, and carried on business until 1856. In 1866 he came to this city, and began at his trade. In 1867 he began business on his own account, which continued till 1884, when he took partners into the concern, which became the Richard Brown Manufacturing Company, doing a large trade in tinware. Mr. Brown has three children: Josephine A., wife of Willis J. Smith of Philadelphia; Frank A., wife of William Uhl, now of Monticello, Ind., and Clarence R., who married Annie Myer, of this city. He is a music teacher in the State Normal School in Greensboro, N. C.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 172

Shuart, Denton G., was born in 1805, at Plattekill, Ulster county, N. Y., and in 1807 came with his parents to Mendon, Monroe county, one mile from Honeoye Falls. His father, Abraham Shuart, was one of the pioneers of this section of the county. Denton G. received an academic education and in 1825 he returned to Ulster county for the purpose of studying law. In 1832 he was admitted to the bar in New York city, and shortly after began practicing at Honeoye Falls. From 1852-1856 he was surrogate of Monroe county, and for nearly a half century was one of the prominent members of the county bar. His wife was Mary Elizabeth Barrett, daughter of Stephen Barrett of Honeoye Falls. He had four children ; Denton Barrett, who died in 1866, and William H., of Rochester, N. Y., Clarence A., of Honeoye Falls, N. Y., and Irving J., of Chicago, Ill. He died at his home in Honeoye Falls, N. Y., August 29, 1892.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 172

Shuart, William H., was born September 21, 1852, at Honeoye Falls, N. Y., and is the son of Ex-Surrogate Denton G. Shuart. He was educated at Genesee Wesleyan Seminary and Syracuse University and received the degree of A. B. from the latter institution in June, 1875. After his graduation he studied law with his father and later with Judge John S. Morgan of Rochester. He was admitted to the bar in 1877 and has since practiced his profession in this city. February 7, 1881, he married Nella Sumner Phillips of Springfield, Mass.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 172

De Floo, Jacob, was born in Holland, November 6, 1847, emigrated when eleven years of age. Being accompanied by an uncle with whom he settled near Brighton. By perseverance and industry he has achieved independence and success, and built a pleasant home at Brighton, being engaged in gardening. Mr. De Floo is a staunch Republican, and now serving his second term as village commissioner of streets. in 1872 he married Nellie Wage, and their sun, Henry, is employed by the Singer Sewing Machine Company.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 172

Ross-Lewin, George W., has been engaged in the wall paper business in Rochester since 1879 when he succeeded the firm of Tower and Herrick. He deals all grades of American, French, and English wall papers, special interior decorations, window shades, picture and room mouldings, Japanese grilles, etc., and executes fresco and general painting, solid and plastic relief ornamentation, etc. The concern, located in Liberty Building, 11 East Avenue, corner Main street, is the largest of the kind in the city, and ranks among the leaders in Western New York.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 172 - 173

Brooks, Frank J., was born in Penfield in 1855, son of Hiram Brooks, who, with his father, Elias Brooks, came from Vermont and settled in Penfield about 1803. Hiram Brooks married a daughter of Thomas Wiltse, of Pittsford, by whom he had ten children. Frank J. married Sarah Saunders, and they have one son, Burton. Mr. Brooks settled on the farm where be now lives in 1880, where he is engaged in farming and gardening.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 173

Lee, John Mallory, M. D., was born in Cameron, N. Y., September 29, 1852, and is a descendant of the late Gen. Robert E. Lee. Dr. Lee received his rudimentary education at Pultney, Steuben county, N. Y., and at the Penn Yan Academy. His father dying when he was a child, he was thrown on his own resources, and at the age of seventeen he became a clerk in the leading drug store of Palo, Mich., where he remained three years, during which time he also received private instructions and prepared himself for the Homeopathic department of the University of Michigan, where he passed a successful entrance examination September 28, 1876, and was graduated with the degree of M. D. in 1879. He returned to his native State and began the practice of his profession in Rochester, and in 1888 took a postgraduate course at the Polyclinic College Hospital of New York, for the purpose of completing his surgical studies he also studied in the Postgraduate School of New York in 1890, 1891, 1892, and 1894; and since 1889 has confined himself solely to surgical practice, being surgeon-in-chief and vice-president of the medical and surgical staff of the Rochester Homeopathic Hospital. He is also State examiner in surgery for the Homeopathic School, and is one of the most prominent surgeons in the Empire State. He is ex-president of the Monroe County, the Western New York, and the New York State Homeopathic Medical Societies; ex-vice-president of the New York State Homeopathic Medical Society; a lecturer on surgery to the Rochester Training School for Nurses, of which he was an incorporator; honorary member of the Homeopathic Medical Society of Michigan; member of the American Institute of Homeopathy; president of the Alumni Association of the Homeopathic Department of the University of Michigan; and was for several years associate editor of the Physicians and Surgeons Investigator. He is now one of the corps of writers on the Homeopathic Text-Book of Surgery. Many of Dr. Lees valuable papers are found in the "Transactions" of these various societies and in the magazines of his school.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 172 - 173

Petten, John J., was born in St. Johns, Newfoundland, April 30, 1832, and was educated there and in the United States. At the age of sixteen he came to this country, located at Charlotte, and followed the lakes for several years in various positions, and was captain for many years. He has been village trustee eight years, school trustee three years, and now holds the position of overseer of the poor. He is a member of Genesee Falls Lodge, No. 504, F. & A. M., also member of Monroe Tent, No. 147, K. O. T. M. He has been married twice, first in 1854 to Eliza Loper, of Charlotte, and they had two children: Frances and Mary. Frances married Richard P. Herrick, of Rochester, N. Y., and Mary is now Mrs. Van Hamburg, of Pittsford, N. Y. Mrs. Petten died September 4, 1872. his second wife was Emeline Hannahs, whom he married in 1873, and she died January 19, 1891. Mr. Pettens father, William, was born at the old home in Newfoundland in 1786. He married Christiana Woods of his native place, and they had eight children. Mr. Petten died of cholera in 1855, and his wife some years later. The ancestry of this family is French and English.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
pages 185 - 186

FRANK W. EMBRY

Frank EmbryFrank W. Embry was born in Victor, New York, April 16, 1845. He was educated in the public schools and at Eastman's Commercial college at Poughkeepsie, New York, from which institution he was graduated in May, 1864. On May 7, 1878, he married Florence L. Ellis of Weedsport, New York. Mr. Embry's father, Thomas, was born at Arlington, Vermont, November 28, 1804, and came to this State when fifteen years old, locating in Avon, and afterward in Victor, where he became a prominent merchant. In the year 1835 he built the stone store recently destroyed by fire. February 12, 1828, he married Sarah Wilcox of that village, who was one of the teachers in the public school. Later on he became a farmer and followed that vocation for twenty-eight years. In 1865 he returned to the village and lived a retired life. He died November 5, 1890, and on February 22, 1886, his wife died. On December 14, 1864, Mr. F.W. Embry entered the employ of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad company, at Syracuse, as a clerk in the freight house. He came to Rochester, August 25, 1867, and was employed at the Rochester station in the same capacity until December 31, 1873. He then resigned to accept the agency of the Merchants' Despatch Transportation company, which position he held until June 13, 1877, when he was made freight agent of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad company, succeeding the late W. H. Cumings, which position he holds at the present time - 1894. At the time the New York Central leased the West Shore railroad Mr. Embry was made agent of that road, and still holds that position. Mr. Embry is a member of Point Look Out club; Frank R. Lawrence Lodge, F. & A. M.; Monroe Commandery, Knights Templar, No. 12; Rochester Consistory of Scottish Rite, and is also a member of the Reform club of New York city. He is a member of Christ church parish. In politics he is a Democrat.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 186

A. P. LITTLE

Adelbert LittleThe towns about Rochester have contributed to its population sonic of its most successful business men. Adelbert Pierson Little, who discovered the necessity for a new trade when the type-writing machine was introduced, and was prompt to supply the want, was born in Riga, New York, October 13, 1848, of New England parentage. His preparatory education was had in Genesee Wesleyan seminary, and coming to Rochester in 1867 he was graduated from the University of Rochester in 1872. For twenty-one years following his graduation he was stenographer for the Supreme Court and at the same time studied law, but did not apply for admission to the bar. In 1885 he began the manufacture of type-writer supplies and has found the business so satisfactory that it now engages his whole attention. Mr. Little has never experienced the pangs of disappointed political ambition for he has never allowed himself to desire promotion in that direction. He is a member of several social organizations and has been president of the Rochester Whist club. He was married February 1, 1877, to Miss Frances A. Munn, who died January 19, 1892. His residence is at 342 West avenue.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 186

THOMAS W. FORD

Thomas FordAt the head of the plumbing interest of the city stands the name of Thomas William Ford. Although but twelve years in business in Rochester, Mr. Ford has already executed most satisfactorily some of the largest plumbing contracts for public buildings and large private residences ever carried out in Rochester. He was born in New York city December 25, 1847, and has a blend of Irish and Scotch blood in his veins, his father having been Irish and his mother Scotch. He was educated at a public school in New York city, and was left an orphan at the age of nine. When only fourteen he enlisted in the One Hundred and Seventh regiment New York volunteers, and learned the meaning of authority and obedience while serving his country in the army for three years. In 1869 he came to Rochester and in 1882 commenced business for himself as a plumber at his present address, 101 West Main street. Among the buildings on which he has done extensive work during the period from 1882 to 1894 are the Ellwanger & Barry building, the P. Cox building, the new Granite building of Sibley, Lindsay & Curr; also the private residences of Wilson Soule and Dr. Ely, both on East avenue. Mr. Ford is a Republican in politics, and was elected supervisor of the Second ward in 1893, and was reelected in 1894 for the Third ward, which, previous to revision of the wards, was the Second. On August 14, 1869, he married Miss E. M. Kinsella of Corning, New York, and has had two sons and two daughters; three children survive, one son having died in infancy; the surviving son is in business with his father and inherits the latter's mechanical ability amid business tact. The private residence of the family is at 68 Glasgow street. Mr. Ford is a member of the C. J. Powers post, the Rochester Whist club and the Union club.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 187

C. T. AMSDEN

Christopher T. Amsden was one of the many prominent and early residents of Rochester who brought with them to this city from their New England homes the traditions amid ideas which have distinguished the people of that quarter of our country and stamped them with marked individuality. His father, Amory Amsden, was a resident of Pultney, Vermont, where his son was born February 12, 1815. He was educated in West Bloomfield, New York, and in 1835 at the age of twenty came to Rochester. From 1843 to 1854 he was cashier of the City bank and from 1854 to 1860 was a partner in the private banking firm of Bissell & Amsden, who issued fractional currency in denominations of 25 cents and 50 cents that is still redeemed on presentation at the Amsden banking house. Mr. Amsden held to the Democratic faith and was a member of the Board of Education in 1856, City treasurer in 1863, a Commissioner of Mt. Hope cemetery, and in 1873 Secretary of the Water commission which directed the building of the water-works. He was captain of the Rochester City Dragoons and a member of Rochester City Lodge, I. O. O. F. In 1840 he married Mary Jane Jenkins, who survives him. His decease took place at his residence in this city in 1877.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 187

FREDERICK A. SHALE

Frederick ShaleThe subject of this sketch was born in this city fifty-one years ago and was reared under the influence of St. Joseph's church, attending the school of the parish during his early boyhood. He later attended the public schools and went directly from them into the active work of life, in which he was eminently successful. He was first employed in the dry-goods house of James H. Nellis on East Main street, where he remained for several years and until he was offered a position with the firm of Burke, FitzSimons, Hone & Company, with which he remained until the year 1869. In the last named year he became one of the original members of the furniture house of Schantz, Minges, Shale & Company. For more than twenty-five years his life has been devoted to business. One of the Messrs. Schantz died, another retired, and he and Mr. Minges, under the firm name of Minges & Shale, remained together until July 1, 1893, when Mr. Minges retired the business was continued under the ownership and management of Mr. Shale until his death, November 23, 1894. Mr. Shale leaves a widow, Louise, the daughter of Henry Beckman, a prominent clothing merchant of Cleveland, Ohio and two children, Harry, fourteen, and Regina, twelve years of age. His domestic life had been a very happy one, and there are few men in the community to whom the ties of the family were more dear. Mr. Shale was one of the oldest members of Branch No. 12, C. M. B. A.

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