Biographies of Monroe County People
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From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 494 & 497
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

As a horticulturist Stephen STACE has gained wide reputation not only in Monroe county but throughout other sections of the state. He owns a fine farm of fifty acres, which is pleasantly situated in Greece township, a mile south of Charlotte. All this is devoted exclusively to the raising of fruit, for he has a fine grape vineyard and in addition has a large quantities of cherries and various kinds of small fruit.

Mr. STACE is a native of Kent, England, born near the Sussex line, August 20, 1832, a son of George and Jane (RALPH) STACE, both of whom were natives of the latter place. The father died when the son was a little lad of three years. In the family were six children: Jane, William R. and George, all deceased; Stephen, of this review; Sihon; and Mrs. Sarah PELLET, of Webster, New York. After the father's death, the mother remained in the old world for a number of years but later emigrated to this country and was here married a second time, this union being with James PELLET, of Webster, by whom she had one son, Thomas PELLET. She passed away in Webster.

Soon after the birth of Stephen STACE, his parents removed to Sussex, where he lived to the age of nineteen years. He spent a portion of this time on a farm and later had charge of a large master's building, having under his supervision forty men. He began work by wheeling brick but his ability was soon demonstrated and after two weeks he was given full charge for two years. In 1852 he emigrated with his family and a large colony to Ontario, Wayne county, New York, having himself made arrangements for their passage. He joined his brother-in-law at Ontario but after a brief period spent in that place came to Monroe county, settling in Webster, where for sixteen years he worked in various capacities. He then purchased a farm in Webster township, and resided thereon for a few years, but in 1868 disposed of that property and purchased in connection with his brother, William R. STACE, a tract of one hundred and sixty acres. Later they divided the land, each taking a portion, but after a time Mr. STACE disposed of a portion of his to a railroad company, retaining possession of fifty acres, which is his present place of residence. This tract is located on the boulevard, one mile south of Charlotte, in Greece township. When it came into possession of Mr. STACE it was covered with timber and stumps but he at once began to clear the land, which was eventually developed into a good tract. He has since improved the place with good substantial buildings and devotes it to horticultural pursuits. He has set out a large grape vineyard, which yields four tons of grapes per acre and for the past twenty-nine years there has not been a failure of fruit. He also has three hundred cherry trees, which for the past few years has yielded twelve tons of cherries. He likewise has an apple and peach orchard and large quantities of currants and blackberries, all of which yield an abundant crop. Mr. STACE has made a close study of fruit culture and is numbered among the best horticulturists of Monroe county, being considered an authority on all subjects pertaining to the raising of various fruits. His place is valuable, he having refused an offer of forty thousand dollars for it.

Mr. STACE has been instrumental in much of the development and improvement that has placed this section of the country in the front ranks of the commonwealth. He organized a company and supervised construction of the ROCHESTER ELECTRIC RAILROAD, which was the first electric line in the state and connected Rochester with Charlotte, and the power house is built on his farm. He was also instrumental in having the boulevard made from Rochester to Charlotte, and for twenty-five years acted as general manager, when the toll road was sold to the county. He also spent a great deal of effort in securing good shipping facilities for Charlotte and got the first coal shipped by water through Charlotte. In many ways he has contributed to the general progress and prosperity of this community.

At the age of ten years Mr. STACE began making a study of phrenology and in this connection has gained national reputation. He has never charged for his services and has conducted many classes in this study, having one at the Philadelphia Centennial and at the Columbian Exposition at Chicago. He has been consulted by thousands of people, including many of the prominent business men of Rochester and other cities.

Although Mr. STACE came as a poor man to Monroe county, he has through his own industry, perseverance and economy, accumulated an excellent property and a goodly competence. In addition to his valuable farm in Greece township, he also owns one hundred and sixty acres of land near Baltimore on Chesapeake Bay and also five acres of land near Palatka, Florida, where for the past sixteen years he has spent the winter seasons. He is a republican in politics, having voted for every presidential candidate of that party since he cast his vote for Fremont. He is a member of the New York Horticultural society and in this way keeps in touch with the advance that is being made along horticultural lines.

Mr. STACE has been three times married. He was first married in England to Miss Emily WILLARD, their wedding being celebrated in 1852. The children of this marriage are as follows: Jane, who was married and at her death left two daughters; George, who makes his home in Rochester and for the past twenty-nine years has been in the employ of the NEW YORK CENTRAL RAILROAD; Artemesia, the wife of J.B. LA SALLE, who resides on her father's farm in a separate dwelling; and Albert E., of Charlotte. His second union was with Josephine Hortense WILDER, who was a teachcer [sic] and his present wife bore the maiden name of Rebecca PATTERSON.

 From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
page 699
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

John DESMOND, practicing at the bar of Rochester, his prominence indicated by the fact that he is vice president of the New York State Bar Association, was born in the town of Parma, this state, April 15, 1854, his parents being Bartholomew and Nancy (FOLEY) DESMOND, both of whom were natives of Ireland. The father settled in Monroe county, New York, in 1849. He was a farmer by occupation and for many years carried on that pursuit, his death occurring in 1892. His wife survived him for about ten years, passing away in 1902. They had a family of eight children, five of whom are living.

John DESMOND was reared upon the old homestead place and attended the country schools, wherein he mastered the elementary branches of English learning. He afterward entered the Brockport Academy and taught for several years in the country and village schools, but he regarded this merely as an initial step to other professional labor and in 1876, at the age of twenty-two years, he took up the study of law, being admitted to the bar on the 4th of April, 1879. He immediately began practice in the city of Rochester, where he has built up a large clientele. As the years have passed he has been associated with several partners, but is now alone. The zeal with which he has devoted his energies to his profession, the careful regard evinced for the interests of his clients and an assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the details of his cases have brought him a large business and made him very successful in its conduct. His arguments have elicited warm commendation, not only from his associates at the bar, but also from the bench. He is a very able writer; his briefs always show wide research, careful thought and the best and strongest reasons which can be urged for his contention, presented in cogent and logical form and illustrated by a style unusually lucid and clear. His standing among his professional brethren is indicated by the fact that they have honored him with election to the office of president of the Rochester Bar Association, in which position he served from December, 1904, until December, 1905, while at the present writing he is vice president of the New York State Bar Association. He was one of the committee and also a member of the sub committee of the state bar association that investigated the charges made against Judge Warren B. HOOKER, one of the most famous investigations that has occurred here for many years.

On the 18th of August, 1880, Mr. DESMOND was married to Miss Flora BUTTS, of Greece, Monroe county, and they have one daughter, Laura M. DESMOND. The family are connected with the Unitarian church and Mr. DESMOND is a gentleman of broad humanitarian principles as is proven by his active co-operation in many movements to alleviate or ameliorate the hard conditions of life for others. He was manager of the State Industrial School for five years, from 1891 until 1896, and is a member of the Genesee Valley Club. In citizenship he is public-spirited and while holding high ideals he has always recognized the practical utility of the opportunities at hand. His time and energies have naturally been given most largely to his profession and he has met with splendid success therein. Well versed in the learning of his profession and with a deep knowledge of human conduct, with great sagacity and marked tact, he stands as a peer of many of the ablest members of the New York bar and is an honor to the profession which has honored him.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 598-600
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Please Note: I have transcribed this biography EXACTLY as it appears in the book. Any errors, especially one that I question in the second paragraph in reference to a date, are the fault of the publishers of this work.

Dayton Samuel MORGAN was born in the town of Ogden, Monroe county, New York, November 19, 1819, and died in Brockport, this county, April 9, 1890. He was the sixth in descent from James MORGAN, the first American ancestor of the family, who was born in Wales, in 1607, and with two younger brothers, John and Miles, sailed from their native country and arrived in Boston, Massachusetts, in April, 1637. John, the next younger brother, was a high churchman, and disliking the austerity of the Puritans, left Boston in disgust for more congenial society and settled in Virginia. Miles, the youngest brother, who was born in 1615, soon after arrival associated himself with a party of which Colonel William PYNCHEON was the head and founded the settlement of Springfield, Massachusetts.

James MORGAN, the first American ancestor, finally located in the settlement of Pequot, which by an act of the general court or colonial assembly at Hartford, March 11, 1657, was named "New London, in memory of ye renowned city of London." making his final abode on the east side of the Thames river, in what has since been named the town of Groton. He was one of the townsmen or selectmen for several years, and one of the first deputies sent from New London plantations to the general court at Hartford, May session, in 1657, and was nine times afterward chosen a member of that grave and important assembly, the last in 1670. His associates and compeers composing the general court or colonial assembly in May 1857, when he was first chosen, as shown by the family records, were:

  • John WINTHROP, of Pequot, governor.
  • Thomas WELLES, of Hartford, deputy governor.
  • Magistrates - John WEBSTER of Hartford; Captain John MCCULLICK, of Hartford; Samuel WYLLYS, Hartford; Captain John TALCOTT, Hartford; Major John MASON, Saybrook; Daniel CLARK, Windsor; Nathan GOULD, Fairfield; John GOSMORE, Southampton, L.I.; John OGDEN, Southampton, L.I.
  • Deputies - George STEELE, of Hartford; John WELLES, Hartford; Richard BUTLER, Hartford; William PHELPS, Windsor; Richard TROTT, Wethersfield; John DEMING, Wethersfield; Jonathan BREWSTER, Pequot; James MORGAN, Pequot; Mathew CANFIELD, Norwalk.

James MORGAN seems to have impressed this carefully selected body of men with a high sense of his sterling honesty and integrity of character, as it appears that in a controversy between the general court and the New London plantations regarding boundaries and jurisdiction it was ordered that the matter should be submitted to three arbiters, mutually agreed upon. New London at once named its townsman, James MORGAN, really a party in its own interests, but nevertheless, the general court as promptly accepted him and without naming another agreed to submit to his sole decision, which, when made, seemed to have satisfied all parties.

The father of Dayton S. MORGAN, Samuel MORGAN, married Sara DAYTON in 1816, of the New Jersey family of that name. He settled in the town of Ogden, Monroe county, being a prosperous miller and farmer. Here Dayton S. MORGAN was born, being the only son of these parents, his mother dying soon thereafter. In the financial reaction of 1836, Samuel MORGAN became overwhelmed and lost his property. He also became broken in health and survived but a short time. Dayton S. MORGAN was then seventeen years of age and was obliged to make his own career. He had secured such educational benefits as could be obtained from the district schools of that time. After his father's financial reverses, by in turn teaching district school and studying hard at night, with great struggle and deprivation he finally obtained a course at Brockport Collegiate Institute, which institution later became transformed into what is now the Brockport State Normal School.

Dayton S. MORGAN secured his first regular employment as clerk in the Erie Canal collector's office. It was his first intention to prepare for a legal profession but finally decided it would take too many years of unprofitable application, being obliged to earn his own living. In 1840 he decided to adopt a business career and in 1841 secured his first position. The following year he became associated with E. WHITNEY, a merchant of Brockport, who for those times was doing an extensive business, retailing dry goods, buying grain, etc. His ambition to succeed and his perseverance and application had gained for him a reputation as "a young man who was bound to succeed," to the extent that in the spring of 1844 he was invited to enter into partnership with William H. SEYMOUR, a merchant of Brockport, and one of the wealthiest men of that section at that period. Mr. MORGAN had been able to save only a few hundred dollars and stated this fact in answer to Mr. SEYMOUR'S proposition but the reply was that it was not his money that was sought but rather his ability and application. The firm of SEYMOUR & MORGAN was then founded and in connection with a large mercantile business established the GLOBE IRON WORKS in Brockport and began the manufacture of stoves and agricultural implements. In the following year, the Hon. E.B. HOLMES of Brockport, member of congress, while in Washington, met Cyrus H. MCCORMICK, of Walnut Grove, Virginia, who was attending to the taking out of patents on a reaping machine of his invention and told him of the GLOBE IRON WORKS of Brockport and the character of the men in charge, advising him to go there. This he did, bringing for the inspection of SEYMOUR & MORGAN his reaping machine. It was extremely crude, having no driver's seat, the plan for raking off the grain being by a man who should walk beside the platform of the machine. The gearing for operating was very imperfect and the cutting sickle was but a thin strip of steel on the front edge of the platform, serrated reversely every four or five inches of its length; yet though so crude, immature and imperfect, it was a machine with which it was possible to cut grain when all conditions were favorable. Trials were made which suggested various improvements. The machine was cut down here and strengthened there and generally brought into better form. A saddle was provided for the men to sit astride, who used an ordinary hand rake in removing the grain from the platform but the driver walked or rode a horse alongside the machine. The experiments and negotiations resulted in an arrangement whereby SEYMOUR & MORGAN engaged themselves to build a quantity of Mr. MCCORMICK'S reapers, as improved, for the harvest of the following year. In pursuance there were built at the GLOBE IRON WORKS by SEYMOUR & MORGAN, one hundred of these reapers for the harvest of 1846, the first quantity of harvesting machines ever built by one concern, put upon the market and sold, and thus the historical fact was established that the old GLOBE IRON WORKS at Brockport, Monroe county, New York, became the first reaper factory in the world.

The firm continued the manufacture of these machines until 1848. They then introduced a machine of their own design, known as the "New Yorker," which gained a world-wide reputation. For the harvest of 1851 they ventured to make five hundred of these machines and the people then wondered how and where they could all possibly be sold. At this time Mr. MORGAN purchased Mr. SEYMOUR'S interest in the patents that controlled this reaper and licensed other manufacturers to build for specified territory. The quadrant shaped platform, today still universally used on reaping machines, was brought out by the firm and other manufacturers licensed. In connection with it and other inventions Mr. MORGAN was obliged to bring several suits for infringement, some of which became famous, involving very large sums of money, and were not finally determined until reaching the United States supreme court at Washington. In these litigations wide attention was attracted. Men of prominence, some of whom became particularly so in the affairs of the nation, were associated as counsel. Among these were Abraham LINCOLN, Edward M. STANTON, who became secretary of war during the war of the Rebellion; William SEWARD, who was New York's whig governor in 1838; Judge Henry R. SELDEN of Rochester, and others.

In all these patent litigations Mr. MORGAN was finally successful. Eventually Mr. MORGAN became sole owner of the concern, which was subsequently incorporated under the name of D.S. MORGAN & COMPANY, and continued as its president and active head up to the time of his death. A few years thereafter this large company, the outgrowth of the pioneer of its kind, bowed to the march of progress of the day and became absorbed by combination with other interests. After disposing of its manufacturing interests the corporation which Mr. MORGAN founded erected in the heart of the city of Buffalo, New York, the first so-called steel constructed office building built in that city, one of the most complete in the country, known as the D.S. MORGAN building.

Mr. MORGAN also became interested in various railroads, and at one time served as vice president of the central branch of the UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. He was also one of those originally interested in organizing in 1869 the CENTRAL CROSSTOWN STREET RAILROAD in New York city. He was a large and judicious investor in real estate and acquired much farming, timber and city property. Convinced of the future of the city of Chicago, he purchased in 1872 the five hundred acres of land upon which that city's suburb, West Pullman, is now built.

Personally, Mr. MORGAN was quiet and unassuming in manner, refusing political preferment and avoiding publicity. While a man of great dignity, he was affable and approachable and always glad to receive suggestions from any one in his employ. He possessed unusual will power, undaunted tenacity and a high order of business talent, with honesty and pureness of purpose. At the time of his death he was president of the Brockport State Normal School board, a vestryman at St. Luke's Episcopal church at Brockport, and a member of the Rochester Historical Society. During his lifetime he performed without ostentation, avoiding publicity, and many important acts of consideration for others were unknown until revealed after his death by those benefited. Indicative of his character, when he had acquired a competence, many years after his father's financial reverses and death, he reimbursed to those the losses which had been incurred through his father's misfortune.

In 1864 Mr. MORGAN was married to Miss Susan M. JOSLYN, of Brockport, who survives him and resides in The Homestead, the old family residence in that village. Their children are George D. MORGAN, William P. MORGAN, Sara MORGAN MANNING, Susan MORGAN MACY, Henry MORGAN, Gifford MORGAN and Gladys E. MORGAN.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 536-538
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Lorenzo S. GRAVES, who is now numbered among the honored dead and who for many years was a leading manufacturer and one of the most prominent residents of Rochester, came to this city in 1859. He was afterward connected with several of the leading productive industries here and finally became one of the large stockholders of the OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY, with which business he was associated throughout his remaining days. He achieved such a goodly measure of success that his methods are of interest to the commercial world and in an analyzation [sic] of his life work it will be found that he based his business principles and actions upon the rules which govern industry and strict, unswerving integrity.

A native of Massachusetts, Mr. GRAVES was born in Southboro, July 18, 1831, his parents being Watson and Fanny (DENCH) GRAVES, the latter a descendant of old Revolutionary stock. The father was born and reared in Southboro, Massachusetts, and while a young man he learned the boot and shoemaker's trade, following the same at Southboro during the early part of his life. He then removed to Ashland, Massachusetts, where he lived retired during his later years. His widow afterward made her home with her son and while visiting her daughter in Newark Valley she passed away.

In taking up the personal history of Lorenzo S. GRAVES we present to our readers the record of one who for many years figured prominently in connection with the industrial development of the city. He acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of Ashland, Massachusetts, and completed his studies in the school at Amherst. Massachusetts. He was living in Worcester, that state, at the time of his marriage to Miss Eliza G. COFFIN, an old schoolmate. Her father, Captain Moses COFFIN, of Nantucket, Massachusetts, was a blacksmith and cooper by trade but followed the sea for many years. After leaving the sea he settled in Wilmantic, Connecticut, where he was employed in the first paper mill in that state. Subsequently he removed to Ashland, Massachusetts, where he resided until 1851, when he became a resident of Springfield, Vermont, where both he and his wife passed away. Their daughter Eliza became the wife of Lorenzo S. GRAVES and unto this marriage was born one son, Fred B., who married Frances OSWALD and resides at No. 5 Lorimer street, Rochester. He is now superintendent and manager of the OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY and is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. [Where he is mentioned, I don't know. His name DOES NOT appear in either index.] Mr. and Mrs. GRAVES also reared an adopted daughter, Ida L., who is now residing at No. 76 Richmond street.

In early manhood Lorenzo S. GRAVES learned the shoemaker's trade with his father, making as high as twelve pairs of boots per day, so expert had he become at hand labor. Upon his removal to Rochester in 1859 he began working as a shoemaker in the employ of a Mr. CHURCHILL. After a brief period, however, he turned his attention to teaming and a little later, in 1860, he gave to the world as the result of his inventive genius and study the GRAVES sole cutter, a machine for cutting leather soles. He then began the manufacture of the same, his factory being located on Mill street. He also engaged in the manufacture of paper cutters and shoe machinery and was very successful in both lines, continuing the business for a number of years and winning a creditable place as a substantial representative of commercial interests here. At length he decided to engage in the manufacture of elevators and the GRAVES ELEVATOR COMPANY was formed, and the present large factory now operated under the name of OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY was erected at Nos. 198 to 210 Commercial street. From the beginning the enterprise grew rapidly until several hundred men were employed on the construction of all kinds of passenger and freight elevators which were shipped to every section of the country. This became one of the largest productive industries of the city. It was developed along progressive, modern business lines, not only meeting but anticipating the needs of the trade in this direction, and Mr. GRAVES continued at the head of the concern until 1901, when he sold his interest to the OTIS COMPANY, at which time the firm name was changed to the OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY, of which the son is now superintendent and manager. The father then retired to private life. He was always a busy man and in his earlier years his evenings were devoted to study and investigation, especially along architectural lines. His experiments resulted in inventions which gained for him a prominent place in the business world. He certainly deserved much credit for what he accomplished and justly earned the proud American title of a self-made man, for he had a capital of but a few dollars when he and his wife arrived in Rochester. The years passed and his industry and ability made him one of the well-to-do citizens. His success may be ascribed to his positive, determined pursuit of business and to the fact that he was a man of unflinching commercial integrity.

After retiring from the field of manufacture Mr. GRAVES, accompanied by his wife, traveled quite extensively, visiting many points of interest in this country and also making three trips to Europe. They likewise visited the holy land and various sections of Asia. Mr. GRAVES was always deeply interested in historic research and during their travels he and his wife gathered many interesting relics of all kinds in various parts of the world, Mrs. GRAVES now having in her home two large, fine cabinets well filled with shells, stones and other interesting relics of their trips.

In his political views Mr. GRAVES was a stalwart republican who took much interest in the party and its growth. He was frequently solicited by his friends to become a candidate for office but always refused. He built a large and beautiful residence at No. 257 Lake avenue, where his widow yet resides, There in the spring of 1903 he became ill and his death occurred on the 21st of April, 1905.

Mrs. GRAVES belongs to the Central Presbyterian church. Theirs was a most congenial married life and the very close companionship made the death of the husband an almost unbearable blow to Mrs. GRAVES. His loss was also deeply felt throughout the city where he had resided for more than forty-five years - honored as one of its leading business men and prominent citizens. He was one of the ablest and best known manufacturers of Rochester, was genial in manner and, though his time was largely occupied by the details of extensive business interests, he always found time to devote to those of his friends whose calls were purely of a social character. He was a thorough exemplification of the typical American business man and gentleman.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 200-201

Hartshorn, John, was born in Orange county, August 25, 1819, a son of Joseph, also of Orange county. John was educated in the public schools and is a self-made man. In 1845 he married Sarah, daughter of Benjamin Ivins, by whom he has had four children Benjamin L. John S., Mrs. C. Ellis and Mrs. W. Palmer. In 1850 be came to Monroe county and bought a farm, which he has since conducted, and is esteemed one of the representatives citizens of the town.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 201

Hines, Daniel C., was horn in Clarkson, now Hamlin, July 7, 1844. His father, Paul, was a native of Sand Lake, Rensselaer county, and the family is of Scotch descent. He married Keziah Crandall, and in 1840 removed to Clarkson from Berlin, Rensselaer county, and in 1850 came to Brockport and entered the employ of Seymour & Morgan. In 1853 he associated with A. B. Harmon in the marble trade, and in 1855 went to Medina end engaged in the same business, remaining until 1874, when he returned to Brockport. Daniel Hines was educated in Medina Academy, August 22, 1862, enlisted in the 17th N. Y. Independent Battery Light Artillery, serving at Manassas, Chapin's Farm, Signal Hill, etc., and was present at Lee's surrender, receiving an honorable discharge June 12, 1865. Returning to Medina, in 1881 he removed to Brockport. In 1867 he married Hannah Barker, who died in 1879, and his second wife was Mary A. Donovan, by whom he has two children, Clarence E. and Hamia B.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 201

Harrison, Edward, was born in Manchester, England, January 12, 1831, and came to this country in 1855. He settled in New York for a year, removed to Orleans county and remained three years, and in 1859 came to Brockport, and engaged in merchant tailoring, which trade he learned in England. In 1862 he married Mary Riley, and their children are E. C., of Montreal; Rev. John F., pastor of St. Mark's church of St. Paul. Minn.; Joseph, who is associated with his father in business; George C., principal of the Latin School at Plainfield, N. J. Our subject is a representative man of his town, holding various positions of trust and responsibility, and has the esteem of all.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 201

Harris, Robert, was born in Penfield in 1826, and is the son of William and Sally (Schoolcraft) Harris. His father, William Harris, came from Scotland to Fulton county in 1802, and to Penfield in 1806. Mr. Harris is one of eleven children, and began working on a farm by the month, saving enough to buy, with his brother George, a farm which they carried on for some years, finally dividing in 1862, when Mr. Harris settled where he now lives, and is one of the leading farmers. In 1853 he married Adelia, daughter of Isaac Crippen, who settled and died on the farm where Mr. Harris now lives. They have two sons, James and Fred, and one daughter.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 201

Humphrey, Nathan M., was born in Elmer, N. J., and came to Henrietta in 1872, with his father, Rev. Jessie T. Humphrey. In 1889 he graduated from the Philadelphia Medical College, and the same year began the practice of medicine in Penfield. In 1891 he married Edith Maxwell, by whom he has one son, Nathan.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 201

Hebbs, James, is a son of Thomas Hebbs, who came from England with his wife Elizabeth (Heath) Hebbs, to Brighton in 1849 and to Penfield in 1860. He was a farmer, and died in 1892, leaving his wife, who died one year later, and two sons, James and George; also two daughters, Mary E. and Emma J.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 201-202

Higbie, Myron R., was born in Penfield in 1845, and was the son of Alanson and Lucy (Rundel) Higbie. His grandfather, William Higbie, was one of seven sons of Jacob, who settled here in an early day. William had four sons, Nathaniel, Silas, Abijah, and Alanson. The latter had three sons, Myron, George and Frank. Myron married Mary, daughter of John G. Wheeler, and settled where he now lives. They have two daughters, Edith and Florence.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 202

Hopkins, Robert M. -- In another part of this work may be found a sketch of Caleb and Marvin Hopkins, the latter the father of Robert, who was born in Pittsford, August 22, 1847, and has always been a resident either of this town or its immediate vicinity, except for a period of three years from 1864 to 1867, which he spent at Granger, O., where at one time his brother James (the elder son of Marvin and Jane Phelps Hopkins) was operating a general store business. Upon the death of his father in 1867 he returned to Pittsford and subsequently engaged in farming. He is also largely interested in the breeding of choice horses. December 24, 1873, Mr. Hopkins married his present wife, Mrs. Emma E. Day. Their only son, Jared, was born July 6, 1887. Mr. Hopkins is and has been for many years an active member of the Northfield Lodge, F. & A. M.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 202

Johnson, Walter W., M. D., was born in 1859 at Naples. Ontario county. Having completed, in 1883, a course at the Normal School at Geneseo, he began in 1884 his medical studies at the New York Homeopathic College and Hospital. Graduating with honors from this institution in 1887, he opened an office at Pittsford, where he is already recognized as a practitioner of great skill, especially in diseases of the nervous system. Dr. Johnson's father was a mechanical engineer of great ability, and hereditary transmission of skill and inventive genius is evinced by Dr. Johnson's talent in this direction, much of his elaborate electrical and other medical apparatus being of his own construction. It is a curious fact that the records of Dr. Johnson's family for five generations mention no member devoted to a professional life. In 1884 Dr. Johnson married Asenath Woodworth, of Baraboo, Wis., and their children are Aldred, Walter and Isabelle. Dr. Johnson's mother is a niece of the celebrated Dr. Bullion, the noted savant and author.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 202

Johnson, H. N., was born in Niagara county, November 13, 1838, a son of John, a native of Seneca county, and grandson of Isaac, a native of Scotland, who came to this country in 1805, and participated in the war of 1812. He first settled in Orange county, and later in Seneca and died in Niagara county. John Johnson married Mehitable, daughter of Abner Bailey, and was a well known Congregational minister in Western New York, and Gerrit Smith's lieutenant and right-band man in assisting the escape of negroes into Canada. H. N. Johnson was educated in Yates and Wilson Colleges, and followed farming till 1868, when he came to Brockport with Samuel Johnson, his uncle (the inventor of the Johnson reaper and mower), and engaged in handling agricultural tools, wagons, harness, etc., which be still continues. In 1859 he married Theresa, daughter of Heman G. Goodspeed.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 202 - 203

Gordon, James, of Fairport, was born in Rushford, Allegany county, April 8, 1820 His father was John Gordon, also the father of Mrs. George W. Green of this place. John was a farmer and brick manufacturer of Rushford. Our subject was a merchant in the latter town and at Brockport prior to 1880, when be removed to Fairport. He has been an extensive operator in the manufacture and sale of lumber both here and elsewhere. Of Scotch ancestry, and he himself the third of the same name, his paternal grandfather came from Scotland and was taken prisoner of war at Saratoga. In Rushford Mr. Gordon ran the whole gamut of official life, holding everything from supervisor down, and with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents: He married Polly Bresler, of Rushford, and has one daughter, Alice, now Mrs. A. C. Hooker, of Fairport.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 203

Howard, Major S. P., was born in Fairport in 1840. His father, the late Lorenzo T., came here from Bridgewater, Mass., in 1838, and was for many years one of the foremost citizens of the village. He was the elder brother of the firm of L. T. & J. E. Howard, carriage builders. He was a trustee of the Congregational church for thirty years. Major Howard's war record is one to which he may justly point with pride. Early in 1862 he enlisted as a private in Co. B, of the 108th N. Y. Vols. He participated in many of the great battles, from Antietam to Lee's surrender, and was seven times wounded, but owing to the iron constitution of the Howard family, he is today a hale citizen in active life. After the war he engaged in farming here, where he still lives, surrounded by material adjuncts which elevate and ennoble his chosen calling. His elegant home contains many a token of camp and field, and of the old war days. January 1, 1862, he married Mariette, daughter of David Hine of Fairport, and their children are S. Irving, Myron L., and Charlotte M. Mr. Howard has filled with credit many official positions in town government, and has served as assessor for nineteen successive years.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 203

Henry, Robert W., one of Fairport's leading citizens and for sixty years a resident here, was born at Chatham, N. Y., January 28, 1814 During the next year his parents removed to Schoharie county, his father being a pioneer of the town of Sharon. Robert early learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed from 1834 to 1847 in the village of Egypt. He was then for seven years engaged in farming, but at this period suffered the loss of his faithful wife, who was Anna M. Snedeker, and the serious impairment of his own health, which necessitated retirement for several years from active life. In 1877 he became a resident of the village of Fairport, where he has served on the village board, and as an assessor. The death of his wife in 1854 orphaned three small children, none of whom is now living.

  From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 203

Higbie, Nathan, late of Fairport, was born at Burnham in 1806. His father was a farmer, and he himself made that his own occupation, leaving behind a substantial fortune and an honored name. He was for a long time a resident of Penfield, where he had large business interests. About 1864 he retired from his active career, and ten years later removed to the village of Fairport, where he was highly esteemed for his nobility of character, and for the resignation with which he endured a protracted invalidism. In 1844 he married Marianne Wheeler, by whom he had three children: Jerome, since 1880 a resident of Deadwood, Dak.; Ella, who resides at home, and Anna, who died aged thirteen. Jerome is engaged in mining and real estate. The first wife of Mr. Higbie was Guelma Wing, and her children were Lucia, David, and Helen. Mr. Higbie died February 28, 1878, aged seventy-eight.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 463-464
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Among the honored dead of Monroe county is numbered Louis Brooks CARPENTER, who passed away May 30, 1906. He was born on a farm in Chili township, December 8, 1850, and there spent his entire life, his widow still residing on the farm, which comprises one hundred and eighty acres of well improved and valuable land. His father, John Henry CARPENTER, was a native of Pittsford, Monroe county, and at an early day settled on the farm in Chili township, where he built a good country residence and developed a good farm.

Louis Brooks CARPENTER was reared on the farm on which he spent his entire life and acquired his education in the district schools of the neighborhood. During the period of his boyhood and youth he assisted his father in the operation of the home farm and after attaining manhood continued to carry on the work there which had been instituted by the father. He had a fine farm of one hundred and eighty acres and was there engaged in general agricultural pursuits throughout a long period. He was an active, energetic man and accumulated a goodly competence, so that at his death he left his family in comfortable financial circumstances.

Mr. CARPENTER was twice married. He first wedded Miss Emma WOOSTER and to them were born a daughter and son: Mary M., the wife of Richmond BANGS, a resident of Churchville, New York; and John H., a resident of Chili. After losing his first wife Mr. Carpenter was married again, his second union being with Libbie L. TROTT, a native of Germany, and a sister of TROTT BROTHERS, monument dealers of Rochester. This marriage was blessed with one son, Louis B., who was born July 23, 1892. Mrs. CARPENTER is a member of the Monroe Avenue Methodist church at Rochester.

Mr. CARPENTER was a democrat in principle and policy and for eight years served as trustee and assessor. He had attained a high degree in Masonry, belonging to the Mystic Shrine. During his lifetime he performed many acts of charity in helping others whom he deemed deserving and his many excellent traits of character commanded for him the high respect and esteem of all, so that his death was the occasion of deep regret to his many friends, for, having spent his entire life in Chili township he was widely and favorably known.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 504
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Abram J. KATZ has figured prominently in mercantile and financial circles in Rochester for more than a quarter of a century. A native of this city, he was born in 1853 and is the son of Joseph KATZ, who in early life left Germany, his native land, and sought larger business opportunities in the new world. Settling in Rochester, he became connected with the oil business and spent his remaining days in this city, passing away in 1901.

Abram J. KATZ obtained his education in Rochester and entered commercial life in 1872 in connection with the clothiers' supply business, continuing in that line with constantly growing success until 1890, when the firm of STEIN, BLOCH & COMPANY was incorporated, with Mr. KATZ as treasurer. His ability in financing the concern was a salient feature in its success and he remained as treasurer of the corporation until the latter part of 1899. His advancement in the business world has been continuous and rapid and he has well earned for himself a place as a representative business man of Rochester. At every point in his career he seems to have accomplished the possibilities at that point and so successful has he been in management of his business affairs that his judgment in commercial and financial circles is considered thoroughly sound and reliable. In 1893 he assisted in organizing the ALLIANCE BANK, of which he has since been a director. He was also one of the organizers of the FIDELITY TRUST COMPANY and from the beginning has served as one of its trustees. Both of these institutions have been successful from the start and are now important factors in Rochester's financial circles.

In the fraternal life of the city Mr. KATZ is also active holding membership in Valley lodge, No. 109, A.F. & A.M., of which he is a past master. He is likewise a member of Hamilton chapter, R.A.M. and Doric council, R. & S.M. As one of the organizers of the Eureka Club he has taken an active part in its interests and for a number of years has been its popular president. Realizing fully individual obligation, Mr. KATZ has given considerable time and attention to charitable work and his efforts in that direction have been a tangible asset of several organizations. He is now president of the Jewish Orphan Asylum Association, organized for the purpose of caring for Jewish orphans of Syracuse, Rochester and Buffalo. He is likewise president of the United Jewish Charities, to the work of which he devotes considerable time, and in many ways he is most kindly remembered for his timely and generous assistance.

Mr. KATZ has built for himself a beautiful residence at No. 345 East avenue, where his large circle of friends always find a cordial welcome and generous hospitality. Mr. KATZ is a representative American of the type that contributes liberally of both time and money to the betterment of local interests. He has not selfishly concentrated his energies upon the building up of his own fortune to the exclusion of humanitarian interests, but on the contrary, with a heart easily touched by any tale of sorrow or distress, he has labored for the amelioration of hard conditions of life for others, and in social and charitable circles of the city is a well known figure.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 440, 443-444
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Frederick COOK, who at the age of fourteen years was thrown upon his own resources, the parental home being broken up by the death of the father, attained through the inherent force of his own character, his strong determination and his close application to the duties that devolved upon him distinction and honors in his adopted land. The penniless boy of fourteen became one of the most successful business men of the Empire state, served as secretary of state of New York and would undoubtedly have gained gubernatorial honors had he not declined. The multiplicity and extent of his business interests also made him one of the best known men of the state, while his activity extended to those concerns which touch the general interests of society in lines of progress, in social and benevolent interests.

The specific and distinctive office of biography is not to give voice to a man's modest estimate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave the perpetual record establishing his character by the consensus of opinion on the part of his fellowmen. Throughout Rochester and the state Frederick COOK is spoken of in terms of admiration and respect. His life was so varied in its scope, so honorable in its purposes, so far-reaching and beneficial in its effects that it became an integral part of the history of Rochester and of the commonwealth. He exerted an immeasurable influence on the city of his residence; in business life as a financier and promoter of extensive industrial and commercial enterprises; in social circles by reason of a charming personality and unfeigned cordiality; in politics by reason of his public spirit and devotion to the general good as well as his comprehensive understanding of the questions affecting state and national welfare; and in those departments of activity which ameliorate hard conditions of life for the unfortunate by his benevolence and his liberality.

The life record of Mr. COOK covered the period between December 2, 1833 and February 17, 1905. He was born at Wildbad, a noted watering-place in the famous Black Forest district of Germany. The father hoped to give his son excellent educational privileges and sent him to one of the best schools of the whole neighborhood, expecting eventually to allow him to attend college, but the death of the father in 1846 completely frustrated this plan and Frederick COOK, then a lad of fourteen years, was obliged to provide for his own living. The family home was broken up and with no advantages of wealth or influential friends to aid him he started out to win life's battles. He possessed a courageous, determined spirit and when but fifteen years of age came to the new world to try his fortunes. He had a married sister residing in Buffalo, new York, at that time and made his way to her home. His youth had been passed in a country where all boys must learn a trade and according to this rule, with which he had been familiar, Frederick COOK resolved to acquaint himself with shoemaking. He did not find it congenial, however, and soon afterward secured employment with a butcher in Batavia, New York, where his close application and fidelity soon won recognition. His ability gained the attention of D.W. TOMLINSON, the president of the bank of Batavia, who was also extensively interested in railroads and because of Mr. COOK'S knowledge of the German language Mr. TOMLINSON procured for him a position on the BUFFALO & ROCHESTER RAILROAD whence he was soon promoted to the position of conductor on an immigrant train on the Niagara Falls division of the Central Hudson road. In this capacity he aided many an immigrant from Germany in looking for a home and the corporation which he served, appreciating his services, soon made him a passenger conductor. He remained with the road for about twenty years, severing his connection on the 1st of January, 1872. That he enjoyed to the fullest degree the friendship, regard and confidence of his fellow employes [sic] and the patrons of the road was manifest by a gift from them of an elaborate set of solid silver plate.

One of the salient features of Mr. COOK'S successful business career was his ability to recognize an opportunity. When once he believed in the possibility for successful accomplishment he utilized the advantage to the utmost and thus the scope of his activity was continually enlarged until he was known as one of the foremost representatives of commercial and financial interests in western New York. While in the railroad service he became intimately acquainted with George M. PULLMAN, and when the latter organized the PULLMAN PALACE CAR COMPANY Mr. COOK invested the greater part of his accumulated earnings in that enterprise, the prosperous history of which is known to the world. Thereby he laid the foundation for his wealth. In 1852 he took up his abode in Rochester, and not only became closely associated with its business history, but also with its political life, but of the latter we will speak later on. He became closely connected with many enterprises that largely promoted the commercial activity and consequent prosperity of Rochester, at the same time adding to his business success. In 1874, he was chosen vice president of the BARTHOLOMAY BREWING COMPANY, which was organized that year with capital of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. From the beginning until 1889 he served as vice president and was then elected president. His activity, however, was not confined to one or even a few lines, but embraced manifold business interests. On the 12th of January, 1876, he was elected president of the ROCHESTER GERMAN INSURANCE COMPANY, as a successor of Colonel Louis ERNST, and so continued until his demise. On the 13th of January, 1877, he was elected president of the ROCHESTER DRIVING PARK ASSOCIATION, and under his capable management its financial interests were advanced from the lowest to the highest degree. On the 16th of May, 1878, he was appointed one of the commissioners of MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY and continuously served in that office, and was chairman of the board from that time until his demise. Hise [sic] name became prominently known in banking circles, for in the fall of 1880 he was made a trustee of the ROCHESTER SAVINGS BANK and later chosen one of its vice presidents. On the 25th of March, 1882, he was elected president of the BANK OF ROCHESTER, the predecessor of the GERMAN-AMERICAN BANK, and remained at the head of the institution until his life's labors were ended. In February, 1887, he was chosen to the presidency of the ROCHESTER TITLE & GUARANTEE COMPANY and upon the death of J. Lee JUDSON he was unanimously elected president of the ROCHESTER GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY of Rochester. He was also president of the ROCHESTER RAILWAY COMPANY, the ROCHESTER TELEPHONE COMPANY and the OHMER FARE REGISTER COMPANY. His career seems almost phenomenal and yet there was not in his business life an esoteric phase. His path was never strewn with the wreck of other men's fortunes, his whole course being marked by business integrity and probity, his success resulting from his close application, his keen discernment and his able management.

Distinguished honors came to Mr. COOK in his political life. If other men who have control of mammoth industrial and commercial enterprises realized that they owe a duty to their country and would enter into politics, the welfare of the nation would be greatly augmented, for what the country needs is men in charge of its affairs who have keen foresight, business sagacity and sound judgment. The democratic party gained a valuable accession to its ranks when Mr. COOK became one of its stalwart supporters. The first political office he ever filled was that of excise commissioner of Rochester, to which he was appointed by Mayor John LUTES, on the 20th of April, 1870, but on account of ill health he resigned in 1872, and with his family made an extended tour over Europe. In the autumn of 1873, however, upon his return to Rochester, he once more took his place in the democratic ranks to labor earnestly and effectively for his party's growth and progress. When nominated for mayor he ran far ahead of his ticket, although Rochester is acknowledged a republican stronghold. On the 19th of April, 1872, Governor HOFFMAN appointed him judge advocate with the rank of colonel of the Seventh Division of the New York State National Guards, and on the 29th of July, 1875, he was appointed by Governor TILDEN, assistant adjutant general and chief of staff of the same division, but he resigned November 24, 1877, on account of the pressure of his private business affairs. In 1876 he went as delegate to the democratic national convention at St. Louis when Samuel J. TILDEN was nominated for the presidency and in 1880 he was called to perform an important service in behalf of his adopted city, being one of fourteen citizens appointed as a commission on behalf of Rochester to guard the public interests during the work of elevating the NEW YORK CENTRAL RAILROAD tracks inside the corporate limits. Politics engrossed a large share of his attention and he was regarded by his party as one of its best and strongest representatives. In 1885 he was nominated for the position of secretary of state and after a strong canvass and an exciting campaign, he was elected by a majority of more than fourteen thousand over Colonel Anson S. WOOD. In this important office within the gift of the people, he served so acceptably that in 1887, at Saratoga, he was renominated and was re-elected over Colonel Frederick GRANT by a plurality of seventeen thousand six hundred and seventy-seven, the highest given to any candidate on the democratic ticket. On the 1st of January, 1890, after declining a renomination as secretary of state, he retired permanently to private life and from that time until his death devoted his attention wholly to the care of his large and varied business interests. On the 31st of December 1889, just before his retirement, Governor HILL, on behalf of himself and other state officers, presented Mr. COOK with a costly watch with chime attachments, while the clerical force of the office gave him a much prized collection of photographs, representing the employes [sic] during his two terms of four years' service. The party, however, still further honored him, when in the state convention of 1894 he was urgently solicited by a large majority of the party leaders to accept the nomination for governor of New York but he declined to become a candidate. The probability was that he would have been elected had be [this is an obvious error; should be he] accepted the nomination, for Frederick COOK was honored throughout New York and sustained a high reputation for political integrity and lofty patriotism, as well as of marked ability.

In 1853 Mr. COOK was united in marriage to Miss Catherine YAKY, of Rome, new York, who died in 1864. The following year he married Miss Barbara AGNE. His one daughter is now the wife of Augustus Masters MACDONELL and is the mother of one son, Frederick Cook MACDONELL.

Mr. COOK was one of the distinguished Masons of the city, belonging to the blue lodge, chapter, commandery and to the consistory, having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish rite. He was likewise a member of the Rochester Maennerchor, which was organized in 1854 and of which he served as president in 1874-5. On the 24th of February, 1882, he became a member of the Liederkranz. he was also a member of the Rochester Historical Society, the Genesee Valley Club, the Rochester Club, the Country Club, and the Rochester Yacht Club, but it would be almost impossible to enumerate his connection with the many organizations which he represented. He was made an honorary member of Salye Citizens Corps, Eighth Separate Company, N.G.S.N.Y., January 26, 1888. In February, 1893, he presented to Peissner Post, No. 106, G.A.R., a handsomely bound memorial record book, one of the finest works of the kind in existence.

Along all lines of humanitarian action which tend to ameliorate the conditions of human life, Mr. COOK was a factor. In February, 1882, he was appointed by Governor Alonzo B. CORNELL, a manager of the Western House of Refuge and was re-appointed by Governor CLEVELAND in 1883, while on the 29th of September, 1885, he was elected secretary and treasurer of that institution. In 1887 he was chosen a life member of the New York State Agricultural Society and on the 19th of December of that year, he became corresponding member of the Oneida County Historical Society. On the 1st of June, 1891, he was appointed by Governor HILL as one of the managers of the Rochester State Hospital for a term of nine years, and upon the organization of the board was elected its president and was re-elected each succeeding year until the office was abolished by law when Mr. COOK was appointed a member of the board of visitation by Governor ODELL. His private charities were numerous, yet no ostentation or display ever characterized his giving. He was especially helpful to young men who were ambitious and determined and who start out in life upon their own account empty-handed. Remembering his own struggles and trials in youth, he was ever quick to show appreciation for close application and to recognize ability by promotion as opportunity offered. For some years prior to his demise he took no active part in political work, his attention being given to the superintendence of his private business affairs and extensive investments. He held friendship inviolable and as true worth could always win his regard he had a very extensive circle of friends, his life demonstrating the truth of Ralph Waldo EMERSON'S statement that "the way to win a friend is to be one." The public work which he did was largely of a nature that brought no pecuniary reward and yet made extensive demands upon his time, his thought and his energies. Opportunities that others passed by heedlessly he noted and improved - to the betterment of the city and the state in many ways. He was unostentatious in manner, but all who knew spoke of him in terms of praise. In his life were the elements of greatness because of the use he made of his talents and his opportunities, because his thoughts were not self-centered but were given to the mastery of life problems and the fulfillment of his duty as a man in his relations to his fellowmen and as a citizen in his relations to his city, his state and his country.

Additionally, on pages 123 - 124 of the Historical Section, the following appears:

Death invaded the ranks of the law in this year, carrying off a number, among whom may be mentioned...February 17th Frederick COOK, remarkable for the almost unbroken prosperity that attended his movements; beginning life as a shoemaker and then a butcher, he abandoned those trades to become a brakeman on the BUFFALO & ROCHESTER RAILROAD (before it became part of the NEW YORK CENTRAL), for some time a conductor of a German immigrant train, then of a regular passenger train; having followed that calling for twenty years, he gave it up to embark in commercial enterprises, which, multiplying in his hands, seemed to owe much of their success to his guidance, for he was president of almost every one of the corporations in which he was interested and was recognized as a financial magnate, not only here but elsewhere; was prominent in Democratic politics and secretary of state of New York from 1886 to 1890.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 198

C. M. FISK

Chauncey FiskChauncey M. Fisk is a native of Oswego, of which city his parents were old residents. Mr. Fisk received his education in his native city and then began business life in New York, where he acquired the mastery of the cutter's art, which he has practiced with such success in this city these many years. He saw, while residing in the metropolis, that the Flower city was a promising field for a young man of enterprise who understood the sartorial art in that degree of perfection which distinguishes New York artists. He came to Rochester in 1883, and was for a time manager for J. Morton & Co., whose business he settled up. Mr. Fisk than began business on his own account and rapidly advanced to the front rank among Rochester's merchant tailors. Mr. Fisk is not less prominent in society circles than in business; he is president of the Epworth league of the First Methodist Episcopal church, and was for five years superintendent of the Mission Sunday-school of that church. He has been elevated to the thirty-second degree in Masonic circles; is a member of the Consistory; of Cyrene commandery; the Mystic Shrine, and is Past Chancellor in Rochester City Lodge, Knights of Pythias; member of the Chamber of Commerce and of the Rochester Yacht club.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
pages 198 - 199

JOSEPH P. OLDFIELD

Joseph OldfieldJoseph P. Oldfield was born in this city on February 27, 1861, and is the thrid son of John and Margaret Oldfield He was educated in the common schools of Rochester and in 1878 went to France and remained for two years in Paris, learning the mysteries of the ladies' tailoring business from the leaders of the trade. On his return from the center of the world of trade fashion, Mr. Oldfield began the business in this city, and was at once recognized by American ladies as one of the leading modistes of this part of the country. During the ten years he was engaged as a ladies' tailor he made annual visits to Paris and kept informed of the progress of ideas in the world of fashion. His talent for dressmaking and decorating was a passion with him from childhood, and the superiority of judgment which he has displayed, may he attributed not more to his association with the French masters than to his inherited ability. In 1890 he started in the undertaking business at 191 State street and in that calling has demonstrated his aptitude so unmistakably that his business as funeral director is now one of the largest in the city. Mr. Oldfield is a Democrat, but has never held office. He is a member of Central Lodge, I. O. O. F.; Kislingbury Lodge, Knights of Pythias; and of Rochester Lodge B. P. O. Elks. Mr. Oldfield resides at the Savoy.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 199

CHARLES F. LIGHTHOUSE

Charles LighthouseCharles F. Lighthouse is a native of this city, where he was born April 24, 1855. He is one of the younger business men of Rochester and yet one of the best known. In early life he received a training in the best schools of the Flower city, and soon after entered upon a most successful business career. He is a tanner of extensive experience and wide reputation. In 1879 Mr. Lighthouse established himself in business as a manufacturer of horse-collars, and was very successful. In 1889 the post-office department at Washington awarded him a contract for the exclusive manufacture of Government mail-bags made of leather only. In August, 1893, he was awarded another contract for canvass mail-bags, and at once began the manufacture of them also. His work has met the requirements of the Government in both instances, and he has to-day as a result of his untiring efforts, an extensive manufactory on Court street, near Washington park, which is a pride to the city. An average of twenty-five skilled hands are employed in this establishment and over one thousand mail-bags per week are manufactured for the Government service. The products of the house meet every demand of the mail service, being light, handy, safe and durable, and are the perfection of utility and convenience. Socially Mr. Lighthouse is a genial gentleman. He is very prominent in Masonic circles, and as a business man his standing is most excellent. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce.


From Landmarks of Monroe County, NY
by William F. Peck (1895)
Part III, p. 203

Klein, Bernard A., was born in Rochester in 1831, and removed to Webster in 1853, where he engaged in agriculture. His wife was Mary A. Greutzinger, who died in 1893, leaving these children: John G., Peter G., Joseph T., Bernard, Albert H., Rosa and Julia. The father of our subject, Bernard, came from Germany to this country and settled in Rochester in 1817, dying there in 1880.

  From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 199

EUGENE T. CURTIS

Eugene T. Curtis, classed among the successful business men of Rochester by all who know him, was born in this city in October, 1844, of American parents. His education was obtained in the Free academy, the University of Rochester and Williams college. He entered the firm of George Gould & Son in 1868, and in 1875, as a member of the firm of Cowles, Curtis & Brady, succeeded the first named firm. Later the firm's name was changed to Cowles, Curtis & Company. In 188o Mr. Cowles retired and the firm became Curtis & Wheeler. Under that title it is known throughout the United States as the manufacturer of the finest grades of shoes for women. The firm occupies one of the largest shoe manufactories in Rochester and its equipment is unsurpassed by any in the United States. The goods made by the firm are principally Goodyear-welts and hand-turned shoes, and the trade is extended all over the United States. About three hundred skilled hands are employed by the firm and its annual output is something over half a million dollars. Mr. Curtis is one of the principal stockholders of the Union and Advertiser company, a member of the Rochester club, the Rochester Whist club and the Genesee Valley club he is also ex-president of the Rochester Chamber of Commerce. He is married and lives at 95 South Fitzhugh street.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
pages 198 - 199

NATHANIEL GILLARD

Nathaniel Gillard has for many years been recognized as one of the Rochester business men best informed on all matters relating to the shoe trade. He is a native of Devonshire, England, where be was born June 13, 1846. In 1854 his parents came to Rochester and their son received his education in the public schools of this city. After leaving school he engaged in 1863 with the firm of Churchill & Company, shoe manufacturers, and worked for them and other concerns until 1871. He then became foreman for Cowles, Curtis & Brady. In 188o he was appointed superintendent for the company and in 1893 was admitted as a member to the firm of Curtis & Wheeler. Mr. Gillard was married in 1873 to Miss Kate Cogswell, and resides at 6 Canfield place. He is a Republican. He is a member of Temple Lodge 412, I. O. O. F., and of Yonnondio Lodge, F. & A. M.

  From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 199

ARTEMAS H. WHEELER

With an uninterrupted record of forty years in the shoe and leather business, it is needless to say that Artemas H. Wheeler is one of the most experienced manufacturers engaged in that branch of industry in the Flower city. Mr. Wheeler is a native of this State, having been born in Essex county in 1829, of American parents. He was educated in the common schools and at Bennet's Commercial college in New York city. In 1853 he engaged in business at Fort Ann, New York, and from 1865 to 1875 was a resident of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In the year 1875 Mr. Wheeler came to live in this city and entered the firm of Cowles, Curtis & Company, shoe manufacturers. On the retirement of Mr. Cowles in 1880, the firm name was changed to its present form, Curtis & Wheeler, and Mr. Wheeler is still a member. His marriage to Mary Norton took place in 1851i and they reside at 207 East avenue.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
pages 200 - 201

EDWARD J. SULLIVAN

Edward SullivanThe subject of this sketch was born in Limerick, Ireland, May 26, 1864, and is a descendant of an ancient and illustrious family who were honored and respected in their native place. His ancestry were popularly designated as the "old stock," and their brave and generous deeds have played a conspicuous part in the fate and fortunes of the Irish nation. Among them may be mentioned General John Sullivan of Revolutionary fame, who struck one of the first blows against English oppression in this country. Mr. Sullivan was educated in the public schools and a business college, having graduated with distinction, and then engaged in commercial pursuits. He subsequently entered into the commission, insurance, and emigration business, which he conducted with signal success. Denied political equality in his native land and filled with ambition for a larger field for the exercise of his natural talents and ability, he came to this country at an early age, and after haying traveled extensively settled down in this city, having resided here for the past ten years, during which time he has taken an active interest in the business, social, and public affairs of the city. Prior to his departure from his native land he was made the honored recipient of a handsome testimonial from his grateful countrymen. He was personally known to almost all the prominent leaders of his race and enjoyed their most implicit confidence and esteem. In politics Mr. Sullivan is a Republican and an ardent advocate of that party's principles. He delivered addresses for the party in several states during the presidential campaigns of 1888 and 1892 and contributed many forcible and interesting articles to magazines and newspapers on the issues confronting the people during these periods. Mr. Sullivan now occupies the responsible position of local general agent and manager for the old, reliable and conservative Berkshire Life Insurance company of Pittsfield, Massachusetts. The company he represents ranks foremost as one of the great institutions of the country, and its officers are men of the highest business and social standing in the Bay State. The local interests of the company and those of the public are carefully guarded in Mr. Sullivan's hands, and he has done much by his prudent and conservative methods to merit the confidence and esteem of the community. The manager of the company for the States of New York and New Jersey is Mr. George W. English of New York, a gentleman of the highest integrity and deservedly popular in that city. Mr. Sullivan's interests are many and varied and he is financially connected with other enterprises. Notwith-standing his active life he is a deep student and a frequent contributor to the press and magazines, his articles having been extensively read and commented upon. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, several social, fraternal, literary and political organizations, and is prominent in all. Mr. Sullivan is one of the most liberal and tolerant of men in all respects, and there does not exist a more ardent admirer of American institutions. In public, business, and social life he is most genial and affable, and can count his friends by the thousands. He has never held a public office, hut has frequently been invited to do so. As a self-made man Mr. Sullivan has already achieved remarkable success, and there can he no doubt that with his talent and industry he will attain greater prominence.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 201

JAMES HALSTED BOUCHER

James Halsted Boucher is a comparatively young man, having been born the fifteenth of April, 1852, and yet nearly ten years ago he attained by dint of quiet perseverance and marked business ability, an influential position as a member of one of the most extensive hardware firms in the city. Mr. Boucher is a native of Williamstown, New Jersey, and is a son of Nelson Boucher and Pollie Halsted Boucher. He was educated at Amenia seminary and the Wesleyan university, Middletown, Conn. He came to Rochester in February, 1873, and was entered as a clerk in the old Farmers and Mechanics bank. He continued behind the bank desk for about a year, when in 1874, a better position offering itself, he transferred his services to the office of Hamilton & Mathews, Exchange street. Here his business qualities soon won for him the appreciation of his employers until in 1885 he was made a member of the firm. He married Mrs. Grace F. Elliott in 1893. Mr. Boucher is a member of the Rochester club, the Rochester Whist club, the Western New York Psi Upsilon association, and of Rochester Lodge, F. & A. M. He is also a trustee of the Chamber of Commerce.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 225

JAMES F. GORDON

James GordonJames Fraser Gordon, to whom the world is indebted for the invention of the machine which reaps and binds grain automatically, was born in Caledonia, New York, in 1842. His father, Colonel Alexander Gordon, was a farmer, and James worked on the land in the Summer and attended school in the Winter until he was a young man. At an early age he manifested unusual interest in mechanism, and at the age of sixteen, having only the tools of a farmer's workshop and a pocket knife, made a printing press which printed a sheet of paper on both sides, a process which at that time was a great advance in the printing art, as newspaper presses then printed the sheet on one side only. Had Mr. Gordon insisted on his claim to having constructed the first perfecting press, the machine made on the farm would, in all probability, have sustained his claim. It was such a good press that the most eminent journalist of America, Horace Greeley, extended his compliments to its inventor. Lack of money prevented him from devoting further time to the printing press and he turned his attention to the invention of a self-binding harvester. Machines had before then been in operation which had superceded the sickle and cut wheat, oats and barley in a way entirely satisfactory, but they had to be followed by a force of men binding the sheaves by a process which had probably been followed since mankind began to cultivate the cereals. James Gordon had himself experienced the laborious work of binding wheat, and with his inventive faculty it was inevitable that he would endeavor to solve the problem of a mechanical binder. He set about the work while on the farm and never gave it up until his self-imposed task was accomplished. In his testimony before the United States court, in a patent case which he brought to protect his rights, he said: "I made my first binder model in 1862 and my first full-sized machine in 1864. In June of that year I filed my caveat. I obtained my first patent for a harvesting and binding machine, May 12, 1868." In July and August, 1868, one of his machines was in operation near this city in a field whose owner ought to mark the spot that witnessed the experiment. From that time until the close of his life Mr. Gordon was identified with the self-binding harvester business, and was interested in forty patents on those machines. The McCormicks of Chicago undertook to use his invention without paying royalty, and as the result of a law suit which followed they paid him two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. The worry resulting from fourteen law suits which he brought against infringers of his patents weakened a strong constitution and he died of paralysis, July 20, 1886. Mr. Gordon's wife, daughter and son survive him and reside at No. 415 Lake avenue.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 225-6

HENRY LOEWER

Henry LoewerHenry Loewer, one of the energetic and successful business men of Rochester, was born in Hassen, Germany, January 8, 1850, and came to this country with his parents when he was a year old. They located in Detroit and Henry grew up in the City of the Straits. He began making his own way in the world when very young and was selling papers as a newsboy at the age of six. When old enough to begin work in a factory he was apprenticed to learn the last-maker's trade. His education was acquired by his own efforts during the intervals outside of working hours. On coming to this city, in 1870, he worked for two years in the last-manufactory of Thomas Boddy, and then entered the employ of John Duffner, in time becoming foreman of the manufactory. After filling that position for four years he entered into partnership with Messrs. Heughes and Frey and established the Rochester Last, Die and Pattern works, which was organized in 1882. The firm was dissolved five years later and Mr. Loewer formed a partnership with Mr. Frey under the title of the Rochester Last, Die and Pattern works, Loewer & Frey proprietors. Their business is at present carried on at 250 Mill street, but it has increased to such proportions that a larger manufactory will soon be opened by the firm at 208 Mill street. Mr. Loewer is a Republican, but has never allowed his party to nominate him for office, although often requested to do so. Mr. Loewer was married on June 25, 1874, to Elizabeth Yauchzi and resides at 31 Gorham street.

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