Biographies of Monroe County People
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From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 476 & 479
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Willis C. COOK, M.D.

The state of New York has attracted within its confines men of marked ability and high character in the various professional lines, and he whose name initiates this review has gained recognition as one of the able and successful physicians of the state, and by his labors, his high professional attainments and his sterling characteristics commands the utmost respect not only of the medical fraternity but of the general public as well, and in Brockport, where he has been engaged in practice since 1887, he has become the loved family physician in many a household.

Dr. COOK is a native son of the Empire state, his birth having occurred in Bergen, Genesee county, June 25, 1832. His paternal grandfather, Lemuel COOK, was a native of Norwich, Connecticut, and served in the Revolutionary war under General WASHINGTON, who signed his discharge papers. Following the war the grandfather located at Pompey Hill, in Onondaga county, while later he took up his abode in Clarendon, where he died at the very extreme age of one hundred and seven years, the only Revolutionary soldier known to be alive at that date, March 6, 1863.

The father, Curtis COOK, was a native of Pompey Hill, Onondaga county, and at an early day settled in Bergen, while later he removed to Clarendon, where he was engaged in farming throughout his entire active business career, owning a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, situated near the old Root schoolhouse. He wedded Betsy Snow BROWN, a daughter of Richard BROWN, of Vermont, he being one of the first three white settlers of Byron, Genesee county, locating on a farm there, where his death occurred in 1852, when he had reached the advanced age of ninety-six years. Both of the parents are now deceased, the father having been called to his final rest December 1, 1883, when he had reached the age of eighty-three years, while the mother survived for a few years and passed away on the old homestead, being ninety-one years of age at the time of her demise. The father gave his political support to the republican party and supported the Sweden Baptist church. His family numbered six children: Henry, a resident of Coldwater, Michigan; Willis C., of this review; Rosetta, who is the wife of Henry VANDEBURG, a farmer of Sweden township, Monroe county; and Nancy, William F. and Whitney, all of whom have passed away.

Dr. COOK, the second in order of birth in his father's family, was reared under the parental roof, assisting his father in the duties connected with the operation of the old homestead property and acquiring his early education in the Root school. At the outbreak of the Civil war, loyal to his country, he offered his services to the government, enlisting November 16, 1861, as a member of Company K, Thirteenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged at Detroit on account of disability on the 3d [sic] of November, 1862, with the rank of sergeant. He re-enlisted as a veterinary surgeon in the Ninth Michigan Cavalry and served in that capacity until the close of the war, being discharged at Lexington, North Carolina, July 21, 1865.

Following his return home from the war he once more took up his abode in Monroe county but eventually decided upon the practice of medicine as a life work and to that end, in 1883, entered the medical department of Niagara University, at Buffalo, where he studied for one year, subsequent to which time he continued his studies in the Northwestern University of Ohio, and in 1885 entered the Toledo Medical College, from which he was graduated in that year. He then returned to New York and located in Brockport, where he has since been engaged in practice. He has ever been a student of the science of medicine and keeps abreast with the advancement which is continually being made in the medical profession through research and investigation. He is genial and courteous in manner, devotedly attached to his work, and therefore constant demand is being made upon his services.

Dr. COOK has been twice married. His first wife was Miss Adeline HAWKS, whom he wedded in 1855, and who died two years later. His present wife bore the maiden name of Mary E. WILLIAMS, and was born at Paw Paw, Michigan, a daughter of Philip and Polly WILLIAMS, farming people of that place. By her marriage Mrs. COOK has become the mother of five children: Francis W., who resides on a farm near Clarkson, New York; Carl R., who is engaged in mining and the real-estate business in the city of Mexico, where through his operations he has accumulated a capital of three million dollars; Lenore V., the wife of Charles H. PHILBROOK, of New York city; J.W., who resides in Rochester, where he is engaged in the drayage business; and Curtis L., a resident of Chicago.

Like his father, the Doctor gives his political support to the republican party. He has served as health officer for ten years and was coroner's physician for two years. His fraternal relations are with the Masonic order. Like the older generations of the COOK family the Doctor has rendered valuable aid to his country, while his brother, J.W., served in the Spanish war, and his brother Frank was with General MILES fighting the Indians in the Rose Bud reservation. His life has been one of continuous activity and that his professional labors have been crowned with a gratifying measure of success is indicated by the fact that he today enjoys a large and lucrative patronage not only in the city of his residence but throughout the surrounding districts as well.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 530-531
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Mark Dean KNOWLTON, deceased, whose inventive genius and executive ability in business largely revolutionized the trade of paper box machinery, was born October 5, 1840, at Milford, New Hampshire, his parents being Samuel DEAN and Nancy J. (SHATTUCK) KNOWLTON. His father was a shoemaker and retail dealer in shoes. The son acquired his early education in the common schools of Milford and afterward attended the Milford Academy to the age of 16 years, when he put aside his text-books and went to Nashua, New Hampshire, to learn the trade of blacksmithing and carriage manufacturing.

Subsequently he had an opportunity to purchase a paper box manufactory, and while he was totally unacquainted with the business he availed himself of the chance offered and his ready adaptability, which was always one of his strong characteristics, enabled him soon to thoroughly acquaint himself with the business in principle and detail. This step was the initial one in the path of progress that eventually made him one of the best known paper manufacturers of the east. For a time he was located in Worcester, Massachusetts, and in 1866 he disposed of his business interests in Nashua and removed westward to Chicago, where he continued in the paper box manufacturing business until the great Chicago fire, in which he lost practically all that he had. At a time when despair with many overshadowed courage and determination Mr. KNOWLTON with resolute spirit faced the situation and with notable energy set to work not only to retrieve his lost possessions but also to assist others. At that time he and his family were living at South Evanston, where, by the way, he held public office in his career - that of justice of the peace. While Mr. KNOWLTON'S business was consumed in the flames. his home still remained to him, and he did much toward assisting others who had lost their homes as well as their business interests. Following the fire he located on the west side, where he resumed operations in paper box manufacturing, but again he was burned out and once more practically lost all. Afterward he joined the W.C. RITCHIE COMPANY. He soon built up a good trade and success attended his efforts. While associated with that firm he gave much of his time toward completing the invention of his machine for the paper box manufacture, on which he had been working. At length he completed the machine and placed upon the market an invention which later revolutionized the entire trade.

In March, 1892, Mr. KNOWLTON disposed of his business interests in Chicago and came to Rochester, where, under the firm name of KNOWLTON & BEADE, he started the manufacture of machinery for making paper boxes. This connection continued until May, 1904, when Mr. KNOWLTON bought out his partner's interest and continued under the style of M.D. KNOWLTON COMPANY. Being a man of great inventive genius, he patented a number of appliances and machinery all used in paper box making, and was widely known as an inventor of great ability, largely giving his time to the business, which was later organized as a stock company. From the beginning it proved a profitable undertaking, reaching large and important proportions. His daughter, Miss Annie DEAN KNOWLTON, possesses remarkable business powers and executive ability and with her brother, Fred Kirk KNOWLTON, is now the vice president of the company. Mr. KNOWLTON was also the principle owner of the stock of the AUBURN BALL BEARING COMPANY. This still constitutes a part of the estate, and the business is practically managed by Miss KNOWLTON with her brother's assistance.

On the 5th of October, 1864, Mark D. KNOWLTON was married to Miss Abbie E. CURRIER, a daughter of Alfred and Abbie (WORCHESTER) CURRIER, of Massachusetts, her father being a railroad man. Unto Mr. and Mrs. KNOWLTON were born four daughters and a son: Annie Dean, Grace E., Hattie Gertrude, Fred Kirk and Ola. The son pursued his education at Purdue University and Columbia College, and married Elizabeth Kent STONE.

The officers of the company are now M.D. KNOWLTON, president; Fred Kirk KNOWLTON, vice president; Annie Dean KNOWLTON, secretary. The business has developed eightfold since it was organized in Rochester and employment is now furnished to over one hundred operatives in the factory. It has been marked by no decline since the death of the father, owing to the marked executive ability and keen business discernment of his daughter, who had been closely associated with him in its conduct.

Mr. KNOWLTON was a man of fine personal appearance, as well as of marked strength of character and intellectual ability. He was a republican but was never active in politics. He served as one of the trustees in the Central Presbyterian church, to which he belonged. Without special advantages at the outset of his career and in the face to two disastrous fires Mr. KNOWLTON as the architect of his own fortunes builded wisely and well, gaining not only success but also an honored name by reason of the straightforward business principles which he ever followed. The family are also members of the Central Presbyterian church. The mother and daughters reside at No. 6 Granger place, where they have a fine residence. Miss Annie Dean KNOWLTON greatly resembles her father in personal appearance as well as in the splendid business qualities which he displayed. Mr. KNOWLTON was very devoted to his family, being pre-eminently a home man, and while his loss was felt in business, church and social circles, it came with greatest force to the members of his own household, to whom he was ever a devoted husband and father.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 516-517
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Edward Allen FROST, who during an active life was called upon to fill various municipal positions and who at all times proved his genuine worth by the trust reposed in him, was born in Rochester, January 14, 1832. His parents were Alonzo and Mary Tiffany (FRINK) FROST, the former born in Johnstown, New York, July 16, 1803. He came to Rochester in 1825 and in 1829 wedded Miss FRINK. Their three eldest children were Joseph, Edward A. and Henry C. FROST. The father engaged in the nursery business in Rochester in 1846 and when his sons had attained a sufficient age they were admitted to the business as partners and enjoyed a very extensive patronage both before and after the war. Alonzo FROST made his home on Plymouth avenue in the third ward and in 1840 built the house still standing at the corner of Plymouth and Caledonia avenues. It remained his home throughout the rest of his life, his death there occurring in 1873. His oldest son, Joseph, who was a prominent young business man, well known, died very suddenly in St. Louis, Missouri, September 26, 1865, when on a business trip to that city. Henry C. FROST the youngest son, was captain in the Eighth New York Cavalry and served until about the close of the Civil war, when he was honorably discharged. He resides in Rochester. He and his sister, Sarah FROST, are the only surviving members of the family.

Edward Allen FROST was educated in the public schools of Rochester and in Professor FOSTER'S school for boys on Adams street. He was interested in the nursery business in his early years and became a member of the firm of FROST & COMPANY, NURSERYMEN, continuing in that business until he withdrew to become county clerk of Monroe county. He was elected to that office in 1877 and served for a term of three years, being the only man who ever held the office two terms. He was afterward supervisor of the third ward for two terms. In January, 1899, he was appointed deputy collector of internal revenue under Collector A.D. SANDERS, which office he held until his death. For several years he was a vestryman of St. Luke's Episcopal church and was greatly interested in the work and upbuilding of that organization, doing all in his power to promote its cause and extend its influence. A social nature and regard for the amenities of life was manifest in his connection with the Rochester Club, of which he was one of the original members, and the Rochester Whist Club of which he was at one time president. He was a member of Rochester lodge, A.F.&A.M., Hamilton chapter, R.A.M., Monroe commandery, K.T., and the Scottish Rite. He held some offices in these organizations, was treasurer of the chapter for many years and was at all times loyal to the teachings and purposes of the craft.

In 1859 Edward Allen FROST was married to Miss Mary WING, of Albany, who died in 1867. In 1888 he was again married, the lady of his choice being Miss Isabella M. EASTMAN, a daughter of Joseph Addison EASTMAN of this city, who was born in Paris, New York, December 31, 1805, and died in Rochester, March 8, 1890, at the age of eighty-four years. His father was the Rev. John EASTMAN, a graduate of Dartmouth College of the class of 1795, who for twenty-three years was pastor of churches in Norwich and Hanover, New York. In 1824 he removed to York, this state, where he continued to preach occasionally until his death in 1834. His son, Joseph A. EASTMAN, was prepared for college at Paris Hill, New York, under the instruction of William R. WEEKS, D.D., and at the academy in Clinton, New York, under the instruction of Professor Charles A. AVERY. He was a member of Hamilton College for two years and joined the junior class of Dartmouth College in the fall of 1825. Following his graduation he taught in the academy in Scottsville, New York, for eight months and in the academy at Fredonia, New York, from July, 1829, until October, 1831. He took up the study of the law with the firm of THORP & BUTTOLPH, at Norwich, New York, and afterward studied with the Hon. James MULLETT, at Fredonia, and with KIRKLAND & BACON, at Utica, New York. He was admitted to the bar in January, 1833, and opened an office in Scottsville, this state, in March 1834. In May, 1836, he came to Rochester and at once began the practice of law with the Hon, S.M. GREEN, who for many years had been judge of the supreme court of Michigan, and the firm became GREEN & EASTMAN. When Mr. GREEN went west Mr. EASTMAN formed a partnership with Judge CHUMASERO and later he was connected with Menzo VAN VOORHIS. Mr. EASTMAN was an influential member of the board of education many years ago and up to the time of his death never lost his interest in the public schools. In politics he was greatly interested and gave his support to the democracy. He held the offices of city clerk and city attorney of Rochester. He was one of the founders of the Genesee Valley Horticultural Society, was for several years its recording secretary and was a member of the executive committee. He took much interest in horticulture and floriculture and as an amateur in years past had the finest private collection of roses in Rochester. For many years he was a vestryman and clerk of the vestry of St. Luke's Episcopal church. He held membership in the old Audubon Club and later with the Rochester Whist Club. He was a very prominent resident of this city, leaving the impress of his individuality upon its public life and private interests. No one who knew Joseph EASTMAN could utter words other than those of kindness concerning him. On the 17th of October, 1835, Mr. EASTMAN was married to Miss Emily J. MCKNIGHT of Watertown, New York, and they had one daughter, Isabella Mansfield, who became Mrs. FROST.

The death of Mr. FROST occurred January 24, 1900, and Mrs. FROST now resides at No. 146 Plymouth avenue in Rochester. He was a man without an enemy and the circle of his friends was co-extensive with the circle of his acquaintances. He lived in Monroe county all his life and was conspicuous in politics. He held important offices and mingled constantly with the people, all of whom respected and loved him. He was honest, courteous, considerate and generous and it is said that not a day passed in which some kindly deed could not be attributed to him. He was always interested in the welfare of the city and its upbuilding and labored most earnestly to develop the present park system, being among the first to pint out the advantages of public parks and to urge purchases where they could be made to advantage. The first park land was bought by Mr. FROST.

In politics Mr. FROST was a republican. He was one of the "306," - a member of that gallant band in the Chicago convention of 1880 that stood together to the last and voted for General GRANT. It was with pride and interest that he always recalled the events of that convention, for at a time when others proved false to their pledges he was loyal and remained true to the interests of those who sent him. He was very proud of his 306 medal and rejoiced in the name of "stalwart." The qualities that he there exhibited were those he displayed throughout his entire life. He was ever quiet and unostentatious in manner, however, but all who came in contact with him to any extent recognized his many good traits, including his loyalty to his friends. The name of Edward Allen FROST is honored wherever he was known and all with whom he came into close contact yet cherish his memory.

From the Historical section on page 118:

The deaths of the year were numerous - in January...on the 24th Edward A. FROST, county clerk from 1877 to 1883.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 449-450
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Frank A. SMYTH, deceased, was born near Canandaigua, New York, and came to Rochester when quite young but prior to this time his father, Thomas SMYTH, had passed away. The son acquired his education in the old academy at Rochester and entered business life as an employe [sic] in a jewelry store, remaining in the service of J.R. WIGHT for nine years, during which time he thoroughly acquainted himself with the trade in every particular. He then embarked in business on his own account and continued in that line until a few years prior to his death, when he began traveling for a chemical company and during his last years he traded in stock. In all of his business transactions he was found thoroughly trustworthy and reliable and as a merchant he wrought along modern business lines, having well appointed establishment, in which enterprise, capable management and a carefully selected stock brought him a desirable patronage.

Mr. SMYTH was married to Miss Carrie GRIEBEL, a daughter of Gustavus GRIEBEL, one of the pioneer residents of Monroe county and afterward a retired farmer. He is now deceased, but the mother of Mrs. SMYTH still resides in Rochester and is the owner of considerable property at GLENN HAVEN. Unto Mr. and Mrs. SMYTH was born one son, Paul Vincent, whose birth occurred in 1892. The death of the husband and father occurred February 14, 1906.

Mr. SMYTH exercised his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of democracy. He belonged to the Rochester Club and to the Elks lodge. He was a supporter of the church and of all worthy movements for the benefit of the race and the promotion of the city's welfare and was esteemed by many friends as a good man, worthy the warm regard and trust which were so uniformly extended him.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 503-504
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Colonel Caleb HOPKINS, whose life history forms an integral factor in the annals of Monroe county, was connected with many events which shaped the policy and molded the destiny of this part of the state. He was born in 1770 and died January 14, 1818, at the age of forty-seven years, three years before the county of Monroe was organized. He was a son of James HOPKINS and a grandson of Ebenezer HOPKINS who removed from Connecticut to Pittsford, Vermont. Both the father and grandfather were farmers. James HOPKINS had two sons, Caleb and James, and two daughters: Rhoda, the wife of Elisha HOPKINS, JR., and Susanna, the wife of Elijah KIRKHAM.

Colonel HOPKINS of this review was married, probably in 1795, to Dorothy MABEE, a daughter of Jacobus MABEE, who came to western New York about 1791. Her death occurred August 20, 1847, when she had reached the advanced age of seventy-nine years. Both she and her husband lie buried in the cemetery a mile south of the village of Pittsford and beside them are the remains of three children: Clarissa, James and Marvin.

The life history of Colonel HOPKINS, covering a period of forty-seven years, was in many respects a notable one. In 1791 he started from Pittsford, Rutland county, Vermont, for western New York in company with General Jonathan FASSETT, and on reaching the Mohawk valley they were joined by Jacobus MABEE. They settled in the wilderness of what was Ontario county. General FASSETT caused a plot to be surveyed for a village nearly opposite Tryonstown on Irondequoit creek but the village never materialized and, becoming disappointed and discouraged, he returned to Vermont, leaving Colonel HOPKINS in charge of his extensive land purchase.

The latter was only twenty-one years of age when he settled in this region. He was made of the stern stuff demanded of the pioneers and the obstacles to be met in a new country only made him more persistent. In 1791 he built the first log dwelling in the present town of Penfield. It was a large substantial structure, containing several rooms, and later many friends and strangers were there entertained. He also cleared and sowed the first land which was cultivated in the town. Noting that the population was increasing much faster in the vicinity of Stonetown than in his own neighborhood, Colonel HOPKINS moved to a point near there about the year 1800 and erected a house about a half a mile south of the present village of Pittsford. He became one of the prominent and active business men of the locality and for several years was engaged in mercantile pursuits in the village with Dr. A.G. SMITH, Nathan NYE and John ACER, while at the same time he was interested in milling and in supervising his several farms. In 1809 he was elected supervisor of the town of Boyle and in the same year was appointed by President MADISON United States collector of customs for the port of Genesee, becoming the second incumbent in the office. He was reappointed at the end of four years and served until May, 1817. He also held the office of inspector of customs during the same time and his principal deputy was Jonathan CHILD, afterward the first mayor of Rochester. During two years of the time he was United States collector he acted by appointment of Governor TOMPKINS as bridge commissioner for Ontario county, with Zacheus COLBY of Genesee county in building the first bridge across the Genesee river below Avon.

While in office Caleb HOPKINS did not confine his attention entirely to civil pursuits. When the war of 1812 was declared he was prompt to serve his country in the field and became an active and efficient officer on the Niagara frontier. Governor George CLINTON had commissioned him as a lieutenant of the militia in 1804 and Governor Morgan LEWIS had made him major in 1807. His further promotions were to lieutenant colonel in 1812 and colonel in 1813, both of these being signed by Governor TOMPKINS. He was in several battles and skirmishes and once received a wound in the shoulder. In one emergency General Peter B. PORTER placed him in command of a band of Indian warriors and evidence is not lacking that he handled them skilfully [sic]. He received letters of acknowledgement from General PORTER and when he resigned his commission Governor TOMPKINS wrote him a letter expressing deep regret that such a course was necessary and also "tendering an acknowledgement of his approbation and gratitude." On the 22d day of March, 1816, Governor TOMPKINS had issued to Colonel HOPKINS a commission as brigadier general by brevet for gallant service during the war. In 1814 the town of Smallwood was divided into Brighton and Pittsford, the latter being named by Colonel HOPKINS in honor of his birthplace in Vermont. About the time the war closed in 1815 he bought the present large homestead farm in the southwestern part of the town of Pittsford and built the house now owned and occupied by his grandson, Jared W. HOPKINS, and formerly by his son, Marvin HOPKINS. After the war he was awarded several contracts for carrying the United States mail in western New York and Ohio. In 1815 he was employed for some time with his friend, Colonel Philetus SWIFT, of Phelps, as commissioner for making alterations in the state road, now known as the Ridge road.

In 1816 Colonel HOPKINS interested himself in the GENESEE MANUFACUTURING COMPANY, which was the first manufacturing company in Rochesterville. He was a member of the general assembly of New York in 1816 and 1817 and served upon the committee in military affairs. There is in possession of his grandson a fine oil painting of Colonel HOPKINS, painted when he was a member of the legislature. It shows an intellectual and attractive face, indicative of strong character, not dissimilar to those of some of his eminent ancestors. He was a lineal descendant of John HOPKINS, who came from England and settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1643 and two years later moved to Hartford, Connecticut. The life of Caleb HOPKINS was not long, but a man of his intelligence, enterprise and public spirit could not fail to leave an impress on the age in which he lived and the record left by him in civil and military affairs is a source of just pride to his descendants.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 481-482
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

Jared W. HOPKINS, engaged in farming and the dairy business, is the owner of a well improved farm of one hundred and seventy-two acres comprised in the home place and he likewise owns an additional tract of one hundred acres, which he leases. His land is located near Pittsford, which is his postoffice address. He was born on a farm near this city, August 11, 1857, and comes of English ancestry, the family having been established in America by John HOPKINS, who came in 1634 from Coventry, England, and settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Caleb HOPKINS, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was an early settler of Monroe county and was colonel of the Fifty-second Regiment of militia, where he achieved distinction as a brave and gallant soldier. Marvin HOPKINS, the father, was born October 26, 1803, and in 1830 he was united in marriage to Miss Jane PHELPS, who was born in Pittsford, November 13, 1813, and died November 22 1898, having for a long period survived her husband, who passed away December 19, 1867. As a supporter of democracy he was prominent in its local ranks and by his fellow townsmen he was frequently called to fill positions of public trust and honor, serving at various times as supervisor. In the family of Marvin and Jane (PHELPS) HOPKINS were eight children, of whom seven still survive: James, a resident of Cedarhurst, New York; Clarissa M. who first wedded Lyman M. BARKER, and after his death became the wife of Orlando AUSTIN, of Williamson; Dorothy P., the wife of Charles W. ROGERS, of Pittsford; Robert M., a resident of Lockport; George; Chauncey I., of Ohio; and Jared W., of this review. The third member of the family, Mary, died in infancy.

Jared W. HOPKINS, the youngest member of his father's family, was reared in much the usual manner of farm lads, assisting in the operation of the homestead property during the period of his boyhood and youth, while his education was acquired in the Pittsford and Lima schools. After completing his education he assumed the management of the home farm, being then a youth of eighteen years, and agricultural pursuits have continued to be his occupation to the present time. There is comprised in the home place a tract of one hundred and seventy-two acres and he has added many improvements thereto in the way of good and substantial outbuildings, including a silo. In connection with his agricultural interests he likewise conducts a dairy business, keeping on hand twenty-five cows, Mr. HOPKINS is a practical and progressive man in his labors and keeps everything about his place in good condition. He has set out an orchard on his place comprising three hundred apple trees. In addition to the home property he also owns a tract of one hundred acres, which he rents, and in 1906, in company with Mr. SCHOEN he purchased of Julian GEAR one hundred and seventy-two acres of land, which they expect to lay out in town lots. He is also associated with others in the MONROE ROAD BUILDING COMPANY, the company having been organized for the purpose of building state roads, etc., his partners in the business being Charles G. SCHOEN and A.J. ROCKWOOD.

On the 1st of February, 1893, Mr. HOPKINS was united in marriage to Miss Lettie May NYE, who was born in Pittsford, a daughter of Alvin E. NYE, an early settler of this locality, being engaged in the farming and nursery business. The home of Mr. and Mrs. HOPKINS has been blessed with four children, Irving NYE, Phelps A., Delora and Jane E., aged respectively twelve, nine, six and five years.

Mr. HOPKINS formerly allied himself with the democratic party but for the past eight years has supported the men and measures of the republican party. For five years he served as assessor and in the fall of 1903 was elected supervisor. The family are communicants of the Presbyterian church. Monroe county numbers him among her most substantial and honored citizens, for his career has ever been characterized by high and manly principles which have commanded the respect of all with whom he is associated whether in business, public or social life.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 488-491
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

George H. LANE, for more than a third of a century a resident of Rochester, was well known in newspaper circles and also in political circles. He was a man of generous nature, of genial spirit and cordial disposition, whose many good qualities gained for him the esteem and trust of a large circle of friends. He was born in Troy, New York, June 26, 1842. His father, Abraham LANE, was a native of Connecticut and was a blacksmith by trade. He followed that pursuit in his early years but subsequently went to California, where he turned his attention to mining, continuing in that field of activity until his life's labors were ended in death June 1863.

George H. LANE acquired his education in Norwalk, Connecticut, and in the Clinton Liberal School. He then went to Tuffts College in 1862 and when his education was completed he came to Rochester and entered the office of the UNION AND ADVERTISER, where he remained for eighteen and a half years. He became one of the best known men in connection with that office, his business ability, executive force and enterprise constituting a strong element in the success of the paper. On his retirement from that office he accepted the position of under sheriff by appointment of John W. HANNON and later was appointed by Sheriff Thomas C. HODGSON.

On the 20th of March, 1866, Mr. LANE was united in marriage to Miss Ella L. SCRANTON, a daughter of Henry SCRANTON, who was born in Durham county, Connecticut, October 30, 1796. He acquired his education in the common schools of his native city and came to Rochester in the year 1812. The entire journey was made in a cart drawn by oxen, and he reached his destination on the 1st of May. He first occupied a little room on what is now South St. Paul street and on the 4th of July, of the same year, he removed into a log house on the west side of the river which he had in the meantime erected. He became proprietor of a toy store and his place of business was known as the OLD SMITH BLOCK. He continued in that line of merchandising until his death, which occurred on the 8th of December, 1868, and was classed as one of the representative business men of the city, continuing in trade here for about half a century. His name is therefore well known in commercial circles and the success which he gained was justly merited because of his honesty in all business transactions and his unfaltering diligence. He was also well known in connection with community affairs and at times stood for progressive citizenship. For two years he was alderman in the city council from the second ward and his political support was given to the republican party from the time of its organization. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity when the MORGAN excitement occurred, and his Christian faith is manifest by his membership in the Lutheran church.

The SCRANTON family has been well known in Monroe county for almost a century. Hamlet SCRANTON was born in Durham county and arrived in Rochester May 1, 1812. He built a log house into which he removed on the 4th of July, this being the first house on the west side of the river. He afterward purchased a dwelling on State street, where he lived until his death in 1850. He had three sons and three daughters: Henry, Edwin, Hamlet, Delia, Hannah and Jane. Of this family, Hamlet D. SCRANTON was born in 1860 and in early life was engaged in the drug business. He afterward became a paying teller in the COMMERCIAL BANK OF ALBANY and later was cashier in the COMMERCIAL BANK OF BUFFALO. Upon his return to Rochester he accepted a position in the office of the canal superintendent where he continued for some years, when he became proprietor of CONGRESS HALL, managing it successfully for several years, after which he retired. He was also vice president of MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK and was well known in financial circles in the state. He held membership in St. Luke's church and died in the year 1882. Edwin H. SCRANTON was born May 9, 1813, and learned the printer's trade which he followed for some years. He was editor of the ROCHESTER GINN, one of the first newspapers in the city, and he became an auctioneer, continuing in that business until his death in 1880. Delia SCRANTON was married in 1815 to Jehiel BARNARD, the first tailor in Rochester, and theirs was the first marriage celebrated in this city. They lived to celebrate their golden wedding. Hannah SCRANTON became the wife of Martin BRIGGS in 1835 and they lived in Rochester throughout their married life, the lady passing away in 1864.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. George H. LANE, was born a daughter, Mary Moore LANE, whose birth occurred in Rochester, August 10, 1884. She acquired her education in a female seminary on South Fitzhugh street, and since completing her course has made her home with her mother. Arch Scranton LANE, who was born in Rochester, December 12, 1878, finished his course in public school No. 4 in Rochester, in 1892, and afterward became a student in the Rochester Free Academy and in the Rochester Business Institute. He then entered the ALLIANCE BANK as bookkeeper but is now engaged in business on his own account.

George H. LANE, the father, was injured on the 30th of September, 1896, by falling into an elevator well and died December 27, 1896. He had become well known in Rochester during the years of his residence here, and his business career and his official services gained for him the respect and good will of his fellowmen, so that his death was deeply regretted when he passed from this life.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 512 & 515
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

As some one has expressed it, "to know Rochester is to know POWERS." In other words, the name of POWERS is inseparably interwoven with the history of the city, its commercial enterprise and business development, and Daniel W. POWERS was the first builder of the modern business structure which is now a typical feature in every progressive city. The spirit of advancement which he thus manifested characterized him in all of his business undertakings and made him one of the most prosperous as well as best known citizens of Monroe county. Born in Batavia, Genesee county, New York, on the 14th of June, 1818, he was a son of Asahel and Elizabeth (POWELL) POWERS, who were natives of Vermont. On leaving New England they removed to western New York, establishing their home in this section of the Empire state when it was largely an unimproved district, giving little evidence of its present development and upbuilding. The father died about 1821 and the mother survived until the period of the Civil war.

Following his father's death Daniel W. POWERS made his home with an uncle and his early experiences were those of farm life. He worked in the fields from the time of early spring planting until after crops were harvested in the late autumn but the pursuits of a mercantile career seemed more attractive and at the age of nineteen he became a salesman in the hardware store of Ebenezer WATTS of Rochester. For twelve years thereafter he was connected with the hardware trade, during which time the careful husbanding of his resources, together with the increase in his salary as his years and efficiency advanced, brought him capital that enabled him to engage in business on his own account as a banker and broker on the 1st of March, 1850. He made the announcement to the public through the columns of the paper that he would conduct an "Exchange business in the Eagle block, Rochester, one door west of the MONROE BANK in Buffalo street." The new enterprise prospered from the beginning. He gave close and earnest attention to his business and the public soon recognized that he was thoroughly trustworthy, reliable and competent, so that his patronage therefore increased and in years brought him a handsome fortune. His success in the undertaking is evidenced by the fact that on the site of his original office now stands the beautiful and substantial POWERS fire proof building, the first as well as the finest and most celebrated of the great modern commercial structures erected in the city. He continued to engage in the banking business until his death and was recognized as one of the foremost financiers of western New York, not unknown throughout the entire state and in other sections of the country. In addition to the POWERS BLOCK he erected the POWERS HOTEL, scarcely equaled in the state outside of New York city. Mr. POWERS was one of the best balanced because one of the most masterful of men. He rated his own powers and opportunities at their just worth and recognized the possibilities of every business situation. He never allowed anything to divert his attention from his business or to detract from the devotion which he gave to his clients' interests.

It was not alone through his private business affairs, however, that Mr. POWERS became reckoned as one of the most distinguished and prominent citizens of Rochester. His labors were of the utmost benefit to the city along various lines of progress. He was one of the founders of the present park system and was a member of the commission which directed the construction of the city hall and the elevation of the CENTRAL HUDSON RAILROAD tracks. Twice he served as alderman and his official prerogatives were exercised in support of valuable measures. The ROCHESTER CITY HOSPITAL found in him a stalwart friend and champion and for many years he was president of its board of trustees. He was likewise president of the board of trustees of the HOME OF THE FRIENDLESS and a member of the board of trustees of the INDUSTRAIL SCHOOL. He was charitable and benevolent, giving freely of his means to ameliorate hard conditions of life for others and in all of his benefactions was entirely free from ostentation or display. He recognized individual responsibility and his charitable work was conducted as was his business - from a sense of duty, of privilege and of pleasure.

Mr. POWERS was married twice. His first wife, who in her maidenhood was Miss Lucinda YOUNG, died in early womanhood, leaving a son, Edward, who passed away in youth. In 1856 Mr. POWERS wedded Miss Helen M. CRAIG, a daughter of the late John CRAIG, of Niagara county, who was one of the early retired citizens of Rochester. He removed from Niagara county to that city and became the owner of extensive real-estate interests here. His birth occurred in New Hampshire, his father being Colonel Joseph CRAIG, who won his distinction as an officer in the Revolutionary war. John CRAIG was united in marriage to Miss Rhoda FASSETT and died at the age of seventy-seven years, while his wife's death occurred when she was seventy-one years of age. Mr. and Mrs. POWERS became the parents of five children: Helen, the wife of J. W. AITKEN, of New York city; William C., a resident of New York city; Jessie, the wife of G.N. PERKINS; and John Craig and Walter W., who make their home in Rochester.

Mr. POWERS attained the Knight Templar degree in Masonry and was attendant on the services of the Brick church, to which he gave liberal support. His was an especially well rounded character. While he achieved success in business that would alone entitle him to distinction, his interests beyond this were most varied and extensive. He was a patron of art and the founder of the famous POWERS ART GALLERY, valued at more than a million dollars. His knowledge of artists and their work was very extensive and his judgment discriminating. The beautiful in form and color had great attraction for him and he possessed that breadth of mind which induces interest in all that is refining and elevating. At all times he kept in touch with the progress of the land, being a man of broad general information. He traveled extensively, going abroad several times and visiting many points of historic modern and scenic interest in the old world as well as in his native land. He was imbued at all times with the spirit of advancement and progress may well be termed the keynote of his character. In the counting house or the office he was regarded as a most level-headed business man but when the call for aid was made he was found to be most sympathetic and charitable. If one met him in the galleries at home or abroad he might well have been judged a connoisseur of art and in social circles he was found to be a most genial and companionable gentleman. A resident of Rochester from early manhood, he was honored and respected by all and his name stood to the outside world largely as a synonym of Rochester's greatness and upbuilding.

From Historical section, page 113:

The year as a whole was remarkably healthy, there being the fewest deaths for ten years, in spite of the increase in population, and in December the fewest on record for that month. Nevertheless, our necrological list is quite full, as will be seen from this record: ...December 11th, Daniel W. POWERS, one of the millionaires of the city, and perhaps the first to pass that mark; he was born in 1818 and was first employed in the hardware store of Ebenezer WATTS, on West Main street, with wages of eight dollars a month; in 1850 he opened, in the EAGEL HOTEL block, a brokerage and exchange office, which soon grew to be a bank, though it was not incorporated as such till 1890; on the outbreak of the Civil war his confidence in the stability of the government led him to invest all his available funds in United States bonds as fast as each issue was put forth; he held several public offices and for many years was president of the board of directors of the CITY HOSPITAL; the block that will always stand as his monument was built at the close of the war, the hotel, just west of it, being erected in 1882, as a part of the original design; in the block he had collected one of the largest and finest art galleries in the country; it was broken up and sold after his death, one of the greatest losses that the city ever sustained.


From History of Rochester and Monroe County New York From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907
by William F. Peck (1908)
pages 677 - 678
transcribed by Linda H. Gutiérrez

There is perhaps no biographical history given in this volume which indicates more clearly the value of unabating energy and unassailable probity in the active affairs of life than that of Charles F. SMITH, who for many years was a controlling factor at Rochester in the most extensive wholesale grocery house of the state outside of New York city. He was born February 23, 1829, in this city and was therefore a representative of one of its oldest, and for many years one of its most honored families. His father, Elijah F. SMITH, was the founder and promoter of the extensive wholesale grocery house which since 1826 has been recognized as one of the most substantial business enterprises not only in Rochester but of central New York. A native of Connecticut, he removed to Petersburg, Virginia, in early life and there successfully conducted a commission business. Coming to Rochester when the city had scarcely emerged from villiagehood, he and his brother, Albert G. SMITH, established a grocery business on the 6th of May, 1826, under the firm name of E.F. SMITH & COMPANY. The first store was in a stone building on Exchange street. The young firm, through sagacious and judicious management, throve and laid the foundation for the present immense trade of the house. In the year 1829 the firm was changed to E.F. & A.G. SMITH and about two years later the rapid increase of their business necessitated removal from the original location to a brick building erected by William PITKIN, on Buffalo street. In 1831 the firm erected a business block of their own at No. 29 Exchange street, where they continued until 1839, when A.G. SMITH retired and Samuel W. CRITTENDEN became a partner. Upon his retirement in 1842 he was succeeded by William H. PERKINS and the firm name of SMITH & PERKINS was assumed. In 1853 Gilman H. PERKINS was taken into the partnership and the title changed to SMITH, PERKINS & COMPANY. In 1856 Charles F. SMITH became a member of the firm, no other change occurring until the death of William H. PERKINS in 1858. The following year Elijah F. SMITH, who up to this time had been a controlling factor in the successful management and conduct of the business, retired to enjoy a well earned rest and throughout his remaining days was connected with no business enterprise save for the management which he gave to his investments. He was the founder of the ROCHESTER SAVINGS BANK and throughout the years of his residence here his name was ever a most honored one on commercial paper, while his business integrity was entirely unassailable. In fact, the name of SMITH, as borne by the representatives of this family, has ever stood as a synonym in Rochester business circles for commercial honor and trustworthiness. Elijah F. SMITH figured prominently in community affairs, contributing in substantial measure to the growth and progress of the city along many lines. He was, moreover, honored with election to the mayoralty as the first chief executive chosen by popular suffrage the mayor prior to this time having been elected by the common council.

The work laid down by Elijah F. SMITH was continued by his son, Charles F. SMITH, who as boy and youth pursued his studies in the grade and high schools of Rochester and in the Westfield Academy in Massachusetts. He was a young man of about twenty years at the time of the discovery of gold in California and in 1849 went to the Pacific coast. A year convinced him that not all who sought riches would win wealth in the far west and he returned to Rochester. Soon afterward he engaged in business in Niagara county, New York, where he remained until 1852, when he entered the wholesale grocery house of SMITH & PERKINS, which twenty-six years before had been established by his father and his uncle, Elijah F. and A.G. SMITH. As indicated, several changes in the partnership occurred and upon the retirement of his father, Elijah F. SMITH, in 1859, the business was continued by Charles F. SMITH and Gilman H. PERKINS. A few years later, when Harvey W. BROWN entered the firm, the style of SMITH, PERKINS & COMPANY was assumed. In 1871 the business block which had been erected by the firm some years before became entirely inadequate for the trade and in January, 1872, they removed to a fine building which they erected and which at that time was considered by traveling salesmen as the best adapted to their line of any in the country. The safe, conservative policy inaugurated by the founders has always been in nowise lacking. In fact the company have ever been regarded as leaders in modern business methods resulting in the enlargement of trade.

A man of resourceful ability, Charles F. SMITH was in other prominent ways active in the business life of Rochester. He was one of the directors of the Old ROCHESTER & STATE LINE RAILWAY for twenty years was a trustee of the ROCHESTER SAVINGS BANK. His success came not through any spectacular means or startling speculations but was won through the long laborious years by methods that neither sought nor required disguise. His success was built upon the substantial qualities of close application, un remitting attention, laudable ambition and unfaltering perseverance. Justice was ever maintained in his relations with employes [sic] as well as patrons. His life was characterized by uniform courtesy to every individual and the humblest man in his service received the same kindly attention, when he had occasion to consult with Mr. SMITH, as did the most profitable customer.

Not long after his return from California, Charles F. SMITH was married to Miss Sarah LONG, a daughter of Dr. LONG, for many years one of the most esteemed and honored physicians of Rochester. They became parents of two sons, C. Walter and Bordman, both well known in business circles in Rochester. The death of Mr. SMITH occurred May 31, 1888, when he was in his sixtieth year of his age. For many years he had been a vestryman of St. Luke's church and in his religious belief and observances was found the secret of his unalterable business integrity and his consideration for others. His life was the embodiment of high ideals and lofty principles and yet in manner he was most unassuming and genial. No man who ever came in contact with Charles F. SMITH ever entertained for him other than the highest respect and esteem.


From Semi-Centennial History of the City of Rochester
by William F. Peck (1884)
pages 649 - 650

Patrick CoxPATRICK COX is the second son of Dennis and Mary Cox and was born in the county town Longford, Ireland, January 1st, 1842. When eight years of age he was brought to Monroe county by his parents, together with his two brothers and four sisters, and the family located in Rochester. Patrick attended the number 9 public school, were he made good progress in his studies; he left school provided with the solid foundation of a good practical business education. He then served an apprentice-ship to the shoemaking trade and for several years worked on the bench, proving himself proficient in the business.

In 1862 when the manufacture of shoes by "teams" was adopted, he was employed by I. & H. Churchill and given the foremanship of one of their "teams," being then only twenty years of age. Two years later he removed to New York city and there began manufacturing shoes on his own account and meeting with fair success until 1871, when the labor troubles caused so many manufacturers to leave the metropolis. In that year he returned to Rochester and opened a factory on North Water street a few doors from his present location. He continued in business alone until 1876, when he took in with him his brother Joseph, the firm being then P. Cox & Brother, and remaining thus until January 1st, 1883. At that time Joseph retired from the firm and a stock company was formed under the name of the P. Cox Shoe Manufacturing company, with Patrick Cox as president.

By constant adherence to principles of integrity in the make-up of their goods and their remarkable energy and excellent business capacity, the firm has steadily increased its product, until they turn out in fine shoes three-quarters of a million dollars annually and give employment to four hundred and fifty hands. Their goods are to be found in every city and state in the Union and their trade mark is everywhere acknowledged to he a guarantee of excellence of quality. The firm is one of the foremost of the shoe manufacturing interest in Rochester.

Mr. Cox is president of the Rochester & Charlotte turnpike road company and also a director of the Merchants' bank. He was maftied in 1874 to Gertrude Gallery and they have had five children, four of whom are living. He has recently purchased what is known as the Hooker residence on East Avenue, with about two acres of nursery grounds attached, where he will make his future home.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 201

DWIGHT J. WOODWORTH

Dwight Woodworth Dwight J. Woodworth, secretary of the Protective Life Association of Rochester, was born in Fenner, Madison county, New York, August 10, 1840, and when five years of age removed to Yorkshire, Cattaraugus county. He received his education in the common schools and at Fredonia academy, and when sixteen years old began teaching, which he continued in alternation with study until twenty-one years of age. He afterwards successively engaged in farming, cheese-making, and furniture manufacturing. He built and operated the first cheese-factory established in Western New York. In 1861 he recruited a company of the One Hundred and Fifth regiment, New York State volunteers, but was himself debarred from service on account of physical disability. In 1879 he became deputy grand master of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, in which capacity he became one of its most successful organizers, establishing in a few months, thirty-five lodges of the order in this State and Connecticut. During the session of 1881 he was deputy clerk of the Assembly at Albany. He assisted in the organization of the Protective Life association and became its first general agent, and a year later was elected director and secretary, which position he has since filled. Mr. Woodworth is a Republican and was a supervisor of Cattaraugus county. He is past master of Arcade Lodge 419, F. & A. M., of Arcade, Wyoming county. He was married to Eliza I. Woodruff, of Yorkshire, New York, and resides at No. 235 Averill avenue. Dr. F. J. Woodworth, of Rochester, is his son.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
pages 201 - 202

WILLIAM H. CHENEY

William H. Cheney was born in Newport, New Hampshire, March 5, 1807. His parents were William and Tryphena H. Cheney. His father was a merchant, a man of indomitable energy, and principal founder of Sullivan county, New Hampshire. Mr. Cheney was educated at Windsor, Vermont, and commenced his business life as a merchant in his native place. In 1836 he removed to Albany, New York, and engaged in the iron business. In 1838 he came to Rochester and immediately rented of Dr. Elwood the old Gilbert warehouse which stood at the upper end of the canal bridge on South St. Paul street, at the junction of the feeder with the Erie canal. He put in an engine and boiler and started an iron foundry, in which he cast the first cooking stove made in this part of the country. It was of an old "saddle-bags" pattern gotten up in Philadelphia. He remained there for eight years when he erected a brick building on St. Paul street near Court, removed his furnace and soon commenced us architectural iron works, making fronts, columns, etc. He stayed in this place and continued in active business until 1879, when his health began to fail. Mr. Cheney was one of the builders and owners of the Genesee Chief, a propeller which was built at Charlotte for passenger and freight traffic on the lakes. He was also one of the owners of a large blast furnace near Sodus Bay. In politics he was in early life a Whig afterwards he became a Democrat, and remained so until his death. In 1845 he was elected supervisor of the Third ward. He repeatedly declined to become a candidate for mayor. He was one of the earliest elected trustees of the Rochester Savings bank, and was at one time vice-president. He was for a number of years president of the old Eagle bank. He was the first president of the Humane society, then called the Bergh society, in which he was greatly interested. His ear was always open to the cry of distress from brute as well as human. In 1830 he married Miss Caroline H. Whittelsey of Cornish, New Hampshire, who died in 1872. Their children are William Cheney of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Mrs. C. W. Dodd of this city. In 1845 Mr. Cheney purchased a residence in Livingston park, where he lived until 1880, when in the hope of restoring his failing health he went to Minneapolis, and died there at the house of his son in 1883. His remains were brought to Rochester and interred in Mt. Hope cemetery.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
pages 202 - 203

HON. WILLIAM N. EMERSON

William Emerson The late Senator William N. Emerson was born in Otsego county, New York, September 29, 1821, of parents who were members of the Society of Friends. He received an academic education at Cooperstown academy and at Hamilton, where he was prepared for college. His facility as a debater and his ability as a writer for the press, of which in after years he gave frequent proof while a resident of this city, were evidences of his devotion to study, and demonstrated the fact that his academic life was passed to the best advantage. In fact, although circumstances intervened to prevent Mr. Emerson from taking a full collegiate course, as was his intention, his public speeches and papers were of such a high character as to give rise to the belief that their author had enjoyed the advantages of college training. But it was not alone what he had learned at school that gave a polish to his discussions; he remained a deep reader all his life, and brought to hear on public questions the store of information which by habits as a student and observer he had garnered up. On leaving the academy Mr. Emerson moved to Alleghany county, where his business life began. He remained in Alleghany county until 1857, in which year he came to this city, which was ever after his home. Mr. Emerson invested in real estate and was instrumental in building up various parts of the city. He was originally a Free Soil Democrat and naturally entered the Republican party when it was organized. He was always interested in public affairs and was often selected for public office while he was a young man and before his removal to Rochester. In 1874-5 he was a member of the Common Council in this city and was recognized as a capable and upright public official. In 1875 Mr. Emerson won a decided triumph, as he was elected on the Republican ticket to represent this district in the State Senate, a place which had been held by the nominees of the Democratic party for six years previous. As a senator Mr. Emerson added to his reputation for probity and ability. Mr. Emerson in 1849 married Sarah, daughter of Judge Willard H. Smith, of Caledonia, who survives him. In 1888, on account of failing health, Senator Emerson visited Europe, where he remained several years, passing his time in study and travel. On his return to America he went to Florida and while coming from that state to this city was taken with his last illness. He died in Knoxville, Tennessee, June 2, 1891.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 203

JOSEPH O'CONNOR

Joseph O'Connor, editor of The Post Express, was born December 17, 1841, at Tribes Hill, Montgomery county, New York, and was educated in the common schools of the State. He was prepared for college at the Rochester Free Academy, entered the University of Rochester on a city scholarship and graduated in the class of 1863. He learned a trade after graduation; taught languages in the Free Academy for three years and studied law, but never practiced; he then took up the profession of journalism. Mr. O'Connor has been engaged as editor in Indianapolis, New York, Buffalo and Rochester. He was married to Evangeline M. Johnson of this city.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 203

LOUIS WILEY

Louis Wiley Louis Wiley, manager of the Post Express Printing company, was born at Hornellsville, New York, May 31, 1869, and lived there until 1880, when he removed with his parents to Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. At the age of thirteen, while attending school, he began his newspaper career as an attachè of the Mount Sterling Democrat, and has almost ever since been identified with that business. He resided for a year in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and in 1886 removed to Rochester and soon after obtained employment as a reporter on the staff of The Post Express, a position which he held until June 19, 1893, when he was called to the management.


From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 203

SAMUEL HAMILTON

Among the business men of Rochester who, during the second quarter of the century were conspicuous for their enterprise, the late Samuel Hamilton was one of the best known. He came to Rochester in 1827, at the age of seventeen, and was associated with Luther Tucker in publishing the Daily Advertiser, one of the first newspapers published in Rochester. He afterward engaged in the grocery business on Buffalo street, now Main street. While the city was in its early formative period he was one of the most active dealers in real estate and built several of the central business blocks. He was the builder and first owner and occupant of the imposing pile on Spring street known of late years as the Reynolds house, and in which the Reynolds library is, by the will of its founder, to have its permanent home. Mr. Hamilton was twice married. His second wife was Sarah Carpenter of Lancaster, New York. On account of failing health he withdrew from active business at the age of fifty, and died in this city in January, 1876.

  From Rochester and the Post Express; A history of the City of Rochester from the earliest times; the pioneers and their predecessors, frontier life in the Genesee country, biographical sketches; with a record of the Post Express
compiled by John Devoy (1895)
page 203

ARTHUR S. HAMILTON

The fact that the city of Rochester is getting on in years becomes impressed on one when some incident makes it apparent that heading business men of the town were born here years after the city was so well established as to have a world-wide reputation. Arthur S. Hamilton was born in Rochester March 13, 1843. In 1866 he engaged in the hardware business under the firm name of Love & Hamilton. After the death of Mr. Love, Robert Mathews and James H. Boucher formed a partnership with Mr. Hamilton under the name of Hamilton & Mathews, which still continues. Notwithstanding the heavy draft made on his time by a large and important business Mr. Hamilton has done far more than one man's work in civic, philanthropic and charitable directions. He was one of the incorporators of the Chamber of Commerce has been for many years a trustee and member of the executive committee of the Rochester City hospital; is and has been since its foundation in 1887, president of the Infants' Summer hospital at Charlotte, and is president of the Genesee Valley Forestry association. Mr. Hamilton was married December, 1864, to Sarah H. Bliss, who died October 6, 1880. On February 22, 1882, he was married to Harriet Ella, daughter of Cyrus F. Paine.

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